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MYTraveler 09-18-2017 10:28 PM

Dock Fenders
 
My boat has had a "permanent" slip for a couple years, so it finally occurred to me that I could attach fenders to the dock and thereby eliminate the need to remove and deploy temporary fenders from the boat every time I take it in and out. I can't see any reason not to, but thought I would ask about the experiences of others before making the switch. What type are best?
Is there any maintenance? Any thoughts or advice? Thanks, Rick

dhays 09-18-2017 10:48 PM

Attaching anything to wooden docks will shorten their life. Because of this reason, attaching anything to the docks, such as fenders, rub rails, etc... has been prohibited. If your marina doesn't mind, I don't see a down side.

Comodave 09-18-2017 10:55 PM

I have 4 teardrop fenders attached permanently (for the summer) to my dock. Saves a lot of work putting them in and out of the boat. I dock my boat at my home so I can do whatever I want.

kapnd 09-19-2017 12:50 AM

Hopefully you can hang them out of the water, so they don't collect growth and then rub it all over your shiny paint job.
The floating pier I use is too low for that, so I hang them off the boat, and must deploy/retrieve them on every trip.

CaptSteve53 09-19-2017 01:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MYTraveler (Post 593701)
My boat has had a "permanent" slip for a couple years, so it finally occurred to me that I could attach fenders to the dock and thereby eliminate the need to remove and deploy temporary fenders from the boat every time I take it in and out. I can't see any reason not to, but thought I would ask about the experiences of others before making the switch. What type are best?
Is there any maintenance? Any thoughts or advice? Thanks, Rick

Dock" Bumpers" or fenders fitted correctly to your dock not only protects your vessel but also protects the dock as well!(By adding the dock bumpers to it, the bumper will absorb most of the impact so the dock is not affected as much.)

Cheers Steve

Giggitoni 09-19-2017 01:51 AM

MYTravler,

Check this company https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...4Jh8i0JRLZgQ8g

I haven't tried them yet. No affiliation.

ranger42c 09-19-2017 07:27 AM

We fitted this kind of bumper to the relevant piles in our slip...

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/taylo...lack--15481120

-Chris

rwidman 09-19-2017 07:47 AM

If they are attached to the boat. they are "fenders". Attach them to the dock and they become "bumpers".

The downside of dock bumpers as opposed to fenders attached to the boat is, as the boat moves in the slip, the fenders roll with the boat, protecting the gelcoat.

Attach the same fenders to the dock (they are now "bumpers") and when the boat moves in the slip, the gelcoat rubs on the bumpers.

So, consider conditions in your slip. If there's no current or water movement, bumpers may work for you. If there is constant reversing current or water movement, hanging fenders from the boat protects the gelcoat.

CDreamer 09-19-2017 09:10 AM

Does your boat touch the dock when it's secured, or do you just need the protection when coming and going?

psneeld 09-19-2017 09:21 AM

From Wikipedia "fenders (boating)"......

Marine fenders are used at ports and docks on quay walls and other berthing structures. They absorb the kinetic energy of a berthing vessel and thus prevent damage to the vessel or the berthing structure. There are 2 major categories of fenders for port applications: Fixed and Floating.[2] Fixed fenders are mounted to the berth structure and compose of buckling fenders such as cell fenders,

The stuctures around bridges to prevent bridge damage are called "fender systems.

Seevee 09-19-2017 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WesK (Post 593755)
If they are attached to the boat. they are "fenders". Attach them to the dock and they become "bumpers".

The downside of dock bumpers as opposed to fenders attached to the boat is, as the boat moves in the slip, the fenders roll with the boat, protecting the gelcoat.

Attach the same fenders to the dock (they are now "bumpers") and when the boat moves in the slip, the gelcoat rubs on the bumpers.

So, consider conditions in your slip. If there's no current or water movement, bumpers may work for you. If there is constant reversing current or water movement, hanging fenders from the boat protects the gelcoat.

WesK,

Good points.... one of the issues some of us have (and perhaps the OP), is that the dock is fixed and the tide moves enough so fender don't work well, unless you get those real long ones. Is there some sort of bumper that works better for less gel coat rubbing? I've seen those wheels, but sure don't seem strong enough, unless there were several of them.

Perhaps the OP could benefit from your answer. Thoughts?

rwidman 09-19-2017 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seevee (Post 593785)
WesK,

Good points.... one of the issues some of us have (and perhaps the OP), is that the dock is fixed and the tide moves enough so fender don't work well, unless you get those real long ones. Is there some sort of bumper that works better for less gel coat rubbing? I've seen those wheels, but sure don't seem strong enough, unless there were several of them.

Perhaps the OP could benefit from your answer. Thoughts?

Look up "fender boards" on the Internet. Basically, you hang two fenders on the boat and hang a long board between them and the dock pilings. The board(s) ride on the dock or pilings and the fenders are between the board and the boat.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-oCBJJ_RHRQ...incoteague.jpg

That's a random photo. the boards can be several feet long if needed.

You can also buy rubber pieces that slide onto a standard piece of 2X4 lumber which eliminates the extra fenders. We carry a pair of these for use on fixed docks when cruising. All the docks in our home area are floating docks and standard fenders work fine.

Seevee 09-19-2017 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WesK (Post 593796)
Look up "fender boards" on the Internet. Basically, you hang two fenders on the boat and hang a long board between them and the dock pilings. The board(s) ride on the dock or pilings and the fenders are between the board and the boat.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-oCBJJ_RHRQ...incoteague.jpg

That's a random photo. the boards can be several feet long if needed.

You can also buy rubber pieces that slide onto a standard piece of 2X4 lumber which eliminates the extra fenders. We carry a pair of these for use on fixed docks when cruising. All the docks in our home area are floating docks and standard fenders work fine.

Good product, I've seen some of those...looks like they could be homemade or commercially bought. I think having them for travel is a great idea. Could use them at home, too. But still looking for a more permanent solution.

Thx

GFC 09-19-2017 12:21 PM

Our marina uses the NOMAR fenders of the type Giggitoni linked to. I like them because they are screwed to the boards around the concrete docks, don't have to be adjusted or moved and do provide protection for the boat.


If there's a downside to them, we live in an area with a lot of dust and the fenders always appear dirty. The surface of the fenders collects dust and, if the boat is allowed to rub against them, that dust would act as an abrasive. When my boat is in the slip we keep it centered using the dock lines so the boat never touches the fenders.


The only time it comes in contact with the fenders is when we're pulling in or pulling out of the slip.

jleonard 09-19-2017 03:16 PM

Whatever they are called I have been tying them to the finger pier for the last several years. They make life easier.
YMMV

MYTraveler 09-19-2017 05:33 PM

Thank you all for your advice. Mine is the end tie of a floating dock. Wind and current are such that the boat is rarely against the dock, although the bow is occasionally pulled out which has the effect of pulling the stern in. I had not considered the potential for abrasion if the fender (bumper) can't spin.

TG 09-19-2017 06:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WesK (Post 593755)
If they are attached to the boat. they are "fenders". Attach them to the dock and they become "bumpers".

The downside of dock bumpers as opposed to fenders attached to the boat is, as the boat moves in the slip, the fenders roll with the boat, protecting the gelcoat.

Attach the same fenders to the dock (they are now "bumpers") and when the boat moves in the slip, the gelcoat rubs on the bumpers.

So, consider conditions in your slip. If there's no current or water movement, bumpers may work for you. If there is constant reversing current or water movement, hanging fenders from the boat protects the gelcoat.

100% Accurate. I had to repaint a boot stripe due to this very scenario. I moved my fenders to the dock when refinishing my brightwork and in less than a week it rubbed through the boot stripe.

Pgitug 09-20-2017 06:16 PM

1 Attachment(s)
These come in white and black. They take away the need for chafing fenders.
https://marina-products.com/product-...-dock-fenders/
Attachment 68700

rwidman 09-20-2017 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pgitug (Post 594185)
These come in white and black. They take away the need for chafing fenders.
https://marina-products.com/product-...-dock-fenders/
Attachment 68700

The gelcoat (or rub rail) will still rub on them. Not as bad as bare timber but still bad on gelcoat or paint.

ranger42c 09-21-2017 07:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WesK (Post 594192)
The gelcoat (or rub rail) will still rub on them. Not as bad as bare timber but still bad on gelcoat or paint.

Does depend on the boat configuration, but those bumper strips are what we installed too (post 7, or so).. and only the rubrail ever touches. And even then, only occasionally, usually at way higher than normal tides, in our case, before I adjust lines again.

They make some of those for floating docks and along edges of finger piers... I could imagine they might touch hull sides in some instances... but then I'd also guess it'd be better than hull sides against wood or concrete... and line adjustment could still minimize hull/rubber contact.

Not really a recommendation, just an observation...

-Chris


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