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ranger42c 02-09-2015 07:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kulas44 (Post 306077)
Ok. Like I said, LEARN.


Geez.

With great respect: Your point is valid, but the lady is indeed here trying to learn, it's not obvious how much her husband already knows, and it's not obvious how much her husband's captain-friend knows.

Doesn't seem useful to assume they all just fell off the turnip truck yesterday and then rag on 'em about it. Doesn't seem useful to assume she (and they) aren't gladly taking in all the advice, learning from it, and fitting it to their situation...

And now... back to my nap time... :)

-Chris

bayview 02-09-2015 09:40 AM

contact BillyIII his plans have changes since he bought and began updating a GS 36. He is in NJ so not too far from you and an honest guy.
Trawler Forum - View Profile: Billylll


I have never seen metal shavings on dipstick but if I did I would walk away immediately.


Obvious rot you describe is just the tip of the iceberg. You can find a better boat maintained by some one who paid attention. Restoring a boat is incredibly expensive. If you do your own work less so but a lot of work just read some of psneed's posts...
I don't think you have to buy junk just keep looking. Talk to Billy and ask how he found his boat.

Wxx3 02-09-2015 11:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bayview (Post 306181)
contact BillyIII his plans have changes since he bought and began updating a GS 36. He is in NJ so not too far from you and an honest guy.
Trawler Forum - View Profile: Billylll

I have never seen metal shavings on dipstick but if I did I would walk away immediately.

Obvious rot you describe is just the tip of the iceberg. You can find a better boat maintained by some one who paid attention. Restoring a boat is incredibly expensive. If you do your own work less so but a lot of work just read some of psneed's posts...
I don't think you have to buy junk just keep looking. Talk to Billy and ask how he found his boat.

A well stated summary: if it's obvious to you, walk away. Because a major project still take all of your time, money and maybe your marriage too, as all as the cats.

Find a good broker in Florida.

Your boat is out there, but it will take time to find.

bayview 02-09-2015 11:42 AM

Diesel oil turns black shortly after changing so is meaningless.

katsailing 02-09-2015 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDCAVE (Post 306023)
I should add, that I would be concerned with the mechanical state of a boat that has sat on the hard for 8 years. The current owner would have to get the boat in condition for a sea trial. Don't even consider that sea trial without a good mechanic on board while you do it.

Then you could always put in a real low ball offer to take the boat "as is".


Jim
Sent from my iPad using Trawler Forum

JDCAVE, I think I may have misquoted on the time it was on the hard. It may have been 3 years, but not more than 5.

katsailing 02-09-2015 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pack Mule (Post 306030)
Just today I installed some hawse pipes . I was using about a 15$ tube of caulk . I new it wasn't going to take all the caulk so I decided to work on my lazarette hatch framing so that I could use the whole tube of caulk . I almost took on too much work today just to keep from wasteing the rest of the caulk . My projects are usually organized to stop when I finish a tube or start something else that will finish a tube . I know that sounds crazy but I hate wasteing this expensive caulking .

Pack Mule, thats understandable I wouldn't want to waste it either. My husband usually has lots of caulk around, but that is for his work which is carpentry and renovations.

katsailing 02-09-2015 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kulas44 (Post 306077)
Ok. Like I said, LEARN. A fool and his money are soon parted. Brutal, but a fact. I've seen this same thing lots of times. It almost always ends up with major dissapointments and usually financial ruin. What happens if your newly purchased 20k boat sinks in her slip. $20,000 out of your pocket, minimum. Probably WAY more. If your gonna buy a cheap boat you really need to be a boatwright, or something close to it.

kulas44, I know, I know! We and including my husbands friend are not assuming anything nor do we think we know everything about these boats. When we look at boats especially my husband, he always thinks of the worse that can happen. He doesn't assume anything, believe me! It is possible because this boat has been sitting on the hard the engine might seize when going to sea trial, right? Also the batteries and generator might be shot that is another expense!

yachtbrokerguy 02-09-2015 12:48 PM

katsailing if you are willing to pay more for the boating lifestyle then keep looking. If you think that living aboard will be less expensive than onshore living, then do more research. If you think that you might finance part of the purchase price than get pre -approved, not many lenders will finance a live aboard. Then find out if you can get insurance on a boat of that age and size without much boating experience.
Many marinas do not allow live aboards and if they do, they want proof of insurance, so find a place to keep the boat and how much it will cost.
If you do find a boat that you like and come to an agreement, find a surveyor who will look at the boat before you plan a sea trial, haulout and more if it is in the water. If it is out of the water ask the surveyor to do a quick walk through and inspection to see if it worth a full survey and the expense of a full survey.

alormaria 02-09-2015 01:21 PM

Looks like a nice boat. 38 MT is a nice boat. I may go see it myself if it stops snowing.

Art 02-09-2015 01:52 PM

Yo, Katsailing

I want the best for you and hubby and feel need to say… there are:

1. Bad old boats... don't ever bother with these, they will eat you alive

2. OK old boats... I'd recommend passing by these too, they also can hurt you

3. Good old boats... some are good enough to get into at the right price, but be very careful

4. Great Used boats... they are available but usually take time (patience) to locate at really reasonable prices. This type old boat is what you want. They make love to you while you make love to them.

I will address only #4.

Great Used Boat (GUB):

- PO[s] very well maintained it. There are NO major bad sectors that can be located by shipwrights, marine surveyors, and marine mechanics... or "your" broker.
- Boat layout, style, size and features are what you seek to own.
- Owner is in need to sell (for one reason or another) so the price can either be as you need it from onset or can become so from dickering with what you can afford.

It is not too easy to locate the “GUB” I outline. Unusual for a GUB to quickly fall into your hands. Normally a wide net needs to be cast wherein the purchaser (you – seeking to find a GUB) has feelers out in all directions and you constantly continue to see/visit-aboard boats for sale. This process may last for months up years. Consistently shopping boat-yards and mariners’ looking at for sale posters, daily going through CL boat ads and visiting YW for listings near you, listening to “your” broker for boats he/she recommends, repeatedly calling/visiting other brokers looking at what they have, walking docks to chat with boat owners about selling theirs or of others they have heard of. These are some of the ways to have large enough net cast to come across a GUB that could become yours… before it is purchased by others.

GUBs – usually do not last but a day to a couple weeks, maybe a month on the market before some person(s) snap then up. So… you need to be ready and be first on site with knowledge of how to at least legally tie up the deal in DP, contingencies, and prelims before anyone else can buy it before you’ve had chance for full surveys.

It may not be easy to find a low priced GUB… but... via persistence it can be done. Especially in today's glutted yet lackluster mid-sized used boat market. And, a reasonably priced GUB can be 15 to 20 X less expensive that buying new!

Get a smart, marine-knowledgeable broker on your side. From what I’ve read on this thread – you REALLY need to do that while seeking to locate yourselves a Great Used Boat! :thumb:

Best Luck! :D

Happy Boat-Shopping Daze!! - Art :speed boat:

BandB 02-09-2015 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 306223)
JDCAVE, I think I may have misquoted on the time it was on the hard. It may have been 3 years, but not more than 5.

Whether it's 3, 5 or 8, here are the most common reasons a boat would sit on the hard that long.

1-Number one by a longshot. The boat needs extensive repairs beyond what the owner can afford to make.

2-Boat is in such bad shape and needs so many repairs the owner has gotten disgusted and decided not to put any more money into the bottomless pit. Often this owner is cured of any boating desire forever.

3-Death of owner.

One of my first questions would be to ask why it's been sitting there so long. If the answer is any other than number 3, then run, unless they come up with some other reasonable answer (in the military and sent to Iraq, job transfer to Switzerland, etc.).

SCOTTEDAVIS 02-09-2015 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alormaria (Post 306247)
Looks like a nice boat. 38 MT is a nice boat. I may go see it myself if it stops snowing.


Advertisement say thrusters fore and aft. I see none, perhaps if you go look you can find em.

BruceK 02-09-2015 07:03 PM

Engines Unused for Years
 
My limited experience with gas engines which sat unused for long periods is that usually something went wrong not long after putting them back into use, and I doubt they were all bad before becoming disused. Like burning a lot of oil, consistent with excessive wear. Does it apply to diesels, can`t say.

markpierce 02-09-2015 07:09 PM

My diesel-engine maker (JD) recommends their engines be run at least weekly.

alormaria 02-10-2015 01:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SCOTTEDAVIS (Post 306313)
Advertisement say thrusters fore and aft. I see none, perhaps if you go look you can find em.


I didn't see them in the picture either. You really need to go see a boat to determine if it's for you. Digital pictures make everything look great. Hell, I look good in a digital picture.

Diesel Duck 02-10-2015 01:38 PM

Me thinks the reason no one is seeing the bow/stern thrusters in the YW photo is because in the YW ad I posted the link to here on TF it says "sistership". That's makes sense since the photo the OP posted of the damage to the rudder shoe reflected a boat with a blue bottom and the bottom of the boat in the photo is red. Now I'm even more concerned for the OP since they can't/won't even display a photo of the real boat they're trying to sell. My unsolicited advice.... Turn and run screaming!

SCOTTEDAVIS 02-10-2015 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diesel Duck 492 (Post 306639)
Me thinks the reason no one is seeing the bow/stern thrusters in the YW photo is because in the YW ad I posted the link to here on TF it says "sistership". That's makes sense since the photo the OP posted of the damage to the rudder shoe reflected a boat with a blue bottom and the bottom of the boat in the photo is red. Now I'm even more concerned for the OP since they can't/won't even display a photo of the real boat they're trying to sell. My unsolicited advice.... Turn and run screaming!

:iagree:

If they don't even want to show the actual boat in an ad, then you sir are correct. RUN.

Being born in New England I tend to have a cynical side that I come by honestly.

Pgitug 02-10-2015 10:13 PM

Because of your budget and if you want an economical vessel, 1 gallon an hour at 6 knots, you may want to look at a few sailboats in the 32 to 36 foot range. Take the mast off, enclose the cockpit and enjoy a lot of room below decks. Just make sure the draft is less than 4'6" or you will hate the boat. And do not even think about cutting down the keel. But older sailboats without their standing rigging are roomy and CHEAP to operate.

Art 02-10-2015 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pgitug (Post 306779)
Because of your budget and if you want an economical vessel, 1 gallon an hour at 6 knots, you may want to look at a few sailboats in the 32 to 36 foot range. Take the mast off, enclose the cockpit and enjoy a lot of room below decks. Just make sure the draft is less than 4'6" or you will hate the boat. And do not even think about cutting down the keel. But older sailboats without their standing rigging are roomy and CHEAP to operate.

That all is true. However, it may be wise to visit both a few sail boats and a few cruisers (trawlers) with wife to see which layout simply feels better. Many sail boats resemble a cave down below. Many cruiser/trawler designs offer much sunlight and views while still in the enclosed salon.

Continued good luck :thumb:

Mick Scarborough 02-11-2015 12:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 305639)
Aren't the boats in Florida generally left out year round in the water?:eek:

Shouldn't boats be taken out at least for a month to let the hull dry out?:confused:

Its for this reason we haven't looked in Florida even though we have looked at listings online.
What do you think?


No, there is no need to dry a hull out. We have had both wood and fiberglass boats that were only out of the water long enough for a bottom paint job. Years of ownership and no issues. Hell I haven't even ever heard of that before your post.


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