Trawler Forum

Trawler Forum (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/)
-   General Discussion (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s3/)
-   -   Problems with Trawlers (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s3/problems-trawlers-18778.html)

JDCAVE 02-08-2015 05:39 PM

Scary said "Varnish $50 a quart. Bottom paint can run $300 a gallon. Caulking $10- $22 a tube. It adds up fast, real fast."

Chuckle! I'd like to find a boat where you'd never have to buy these!


Jim
Sent from my iPad using Trawler Forum

Wxx3 02-08-2015 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mule (Post 305989)
After restoring a 34 Mainship, nothing mechanical, I started at $34,000 spent beyond 2x that. Buy a boat the work has already been done on or do not do this. Boat parts are measured in in troy ounces. You are better to finance and buy a better boat. Usually in the best case you will need to spend 10%, usually 20% to30%, upon purchase. No property tax, only electric and slip fees to deal with, can be cheap living but can also wipe you out. Be careful, very careful.

Yes. All the advice is good.

To answer your question, the fact that a boat has been out of the water for 8 years depends on why?

Could be older owners or could be it's not affordable to make it sea worthy!

Keep looking.

I drove to Florida for thanksgiving. Find a broker down there to help you.

You want to live on this boat. They're about 1000 times more liveaboards down south than up north.

$$ wise you are far better off getting a boat that had been doing what you want to do.

JDCAVE 02-08-2015 05:44 PM

Problems with Trawlers
 
I should add, that I would be concerned with the mechanical state of a boat that has sat on the hard for 8 years. The current owner would have to get the boat in condition for a sea trial. Don't even consider that sea trial without a good mechanic on board while you do it.

Then you could always put in a real low ball offer to take the boat "as is".


Jim
Sent from my iPad using Trawler Forum

Pack Mule 02-08-2015 06:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDCAVE (Post 306019)
Scary said "Varnish $50 a quart. Bottom paint can run $300 a gallon. Caulking $10- $22 a tube. It adds up fast, real fast."

Chuckle! I'd like to find a boat where you'd never have to buy these!


Jim
Sent from my iPad using Trawler Forum

Just today I installed some hawse pipes . I was using about a 15$ tube of caulk . I new it wasn't going to take all the caulk so I decided to work on my lazarette hatch framing so that I could use the whole tube of caulk . I almost took on too much work today just to keep from wasteing the rest of the caulk . My projects are usually organized to stop when I finish a tube or start something else that will finish a tube . I know that sounds crazy but I hate wasteing this expensive caulking .

BandB 02-08-2015 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDCAVE (Post 306023)
I should add, that I would be concerned with the mechanical state of a boat that has sat on the hard for 8 years. The current owner would have to get the boat in condition for a sea trial. Don't even consider that sea trial without a good mechanic on board while you do it.

Then you could always put in a real low ball offer to take the boat "as is".


Jim
Sent from my iPad using Trawler Forum

If the boat isn't in the water running for a sea trial then I'd value the engines at zero assuming having to replace them. I think one has to assume the worst.

Mule 02-08-2015 08:06 PM

Save the caulk....... Seal end with blue tape, electrical tape, duct tape or whatever, take out of the gun...walk to your freezer..place tube of not empty caulk in freezer to be used another day. It will stay ready for months.

healhustler 02-08-2015 09:30 PM

Great tip, Mule, but I'll need that caulk quickly thawed to seal the wounds I'll get when my Admiral finds it next to her truffles in the freezer.:eek:

Lollipop 02-08-2015 09:59 PM

A good oil analysis will tell you what type of metal it is and where it is likely coming from. It will be a little costly but a good negotiating tool and let you know what is in store for near future repairs. I have found many of the boats up North that have developed any water leaks into foam core decking, around screws, or around hatches have developed stress cracks in the area. When this water freezes it expands and causes these cracks, which in turn allows more water to seep in and the cracks continue to expand. We recently looked at an 81 Mainship 40 near Baltimore that was a low hr. boat. It seemed to be good mechanical, but was going to need the whole upper deck re-cored and all windows and hatches remove to repair this damage. One more winter and this boat will be parted out more than likely. Check out a 36' Marine
trader that is for sale by owner on Jax Craigs list. It is located in San Mateo FL, in your price range and is a very nice boat. The owners have had her 17 yrs. I have no monetary, or commercial intrest in the boat. We looked at it and was very impressed. We ended up with the Prairie 36 for the aft cabin. Good Luck

kulas44 02-08-2015 10:18 PM

Ok. Like I said, LEARN. A fool and his money are soon parted. Brutal, but a fact. I've seen this same thing lots of times. It almost always ends up with major dissapointments and usually financial ruin. What happens if your newly purchased 20k boat sinks in her slip. $20,000 out of your pocket, minimum. Probably WAY more. If your gonna buy a cheap boat you really need to be a boatwright, or something close to it.

BandB 02-08-2015 10:41 PM

I'm going to attempt to put what kulas44 is saying another way. Boats that need a lot of work are bargains only if you can do that work. Hiring it to be done and they quickly become far more costly than if you'd gotten a boat in good condition.

You say you need to find something soon and I'll point out one of the things you can't do in boating, live on a schedule. You need to find the right boat. Just like when the time comes you'll need to wait for the right weather window. And living on a schedule then will put you in real danger. But then getting a very bad boat does too.

My cousin and I were the same age and he drove the absolute biggest pieces of junk cars in college. He could fix anything that came along. If it stopped along the road he'd get it restarted. I could not have ever owned those cars. I would have never made it where I was going as I had no mechanical ability.

kulas44 02-08-2015 11:17 PM

I drive a 1998 chevy suburban that has 310,000 miles on it. Although almost nothing mechanical on it has nearly that many miles. It has quit on me several times but never left me stranded. I have a LARGE tool box and every spare imaginable. I carry a suitcase welder and a small cutting torch. A 20 lb CO2 bottle with a regulator, mostly to air up a low tire, but also to run a few air tools. Etc. I am a little paranoid when it comes to mechanical devices.

N4712 02-08-2015 11:20 PM

Problems with Trawlers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kulas44 (Post 306093)
I drive a 1998 chevy suburban that has 310,000 miles on it. Although almost nothing mechanical on it has nearly that many miles. It has quit on me several times but never left me stranded. I have a LARGE tool box and every spare imaginable. I carry a suitcase welder and a small cutting torch. A 20 lb CO2 bottle with a regulator, mostly to air up a low tire, but also to run a few air tools. Etc. I am a little paranoid when it comes to mechanical devices.


Well if you had a Ford you wouldn't have to carry all those tools or worry. :rolleyes: :lol::rofl:

Diesel Duck 02-08-2015 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 305585)
Pricing Boats from $25,000 to $40,000 and 40 is pushing it for us with limited funds.

1994 Marine Trader 38 Double Cabin Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

If this is the MT you're considering, based upon your initial statement regarding your budget, IMHO it's not the boat for you. I say this because I can see you having to put a lot of money into repairs and refurbishing, maybe as much, or more, than you end up buying the boat for (In the YW ad it says "The boat has been in storage and needs some TLC". Note: This is salesman's lingo for, it needs a whole lotta work and money to get it into shape) and even if you do all the work yourselves me thinks this project boat will be a massive drain on your already admitted low budget with limited funds... "$25,000 to $40,000 and 40 is pushing it for us with limited funds."

I wish you the best and can only hope, for your sake, you take stock in all of the good sound advice being given to you here on TF. One last thing... Rather than ask peoples opinion about some damage to the rudder shoe I'd spend some of that limited funds on a competent surveyor and get his/her professional opinion. He'll also know what to do with the awl and plastic hammer.

kulas44 02-08-2015 11:29 PM

My Ford F550 Powersmoke diesel has a busted piston, at 134,000 miles. DD492 has words of wisdom,,,heed !!!

BandB 02-08-2015 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diesel Duck 492 (Post 306096)
The boat has been in storage and needs some TLC"[/B][/I]. Note: This is salesman's lingo for, it needs a whole lotta work and money to get it into shape) and even if you do all the work yourselves me thinks this project boat will be a massive drain on your already admitted low budget with limited funds... ".

Yes, those words of needing some TLC are generally scary. On a house it generally means it needs a total rehab.

Art 02-09-2015 12:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Capt.Bill11 (Post 306018)
A number of things. But it's very rare to see metal shavings on a dip stick unless something catastrophic happened to the engine. And even then you'd have to pull the dip stick right after the engine had stopped before the metal had a chance to drop out of suspension to see much of it I would think.

I had opportunity to pull a dip stick with much very fine metal particles visible months after the engine had eaten itself alive. The metal flakes were finer than salt and suspended in the oil. Guess it takes some time for all of it to settle to bottom.

Art 02-09-2015 01:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pack Mule (Post 306030)
Just today I installed some hawse pipes . I was using about a 15$ tube of caulk . I new it wasn't going to take all the caulk so I decided to work on my lazarette hatch framing so that I could use the whole tube of caulk . I almost took on too much work today just to keep from wasteing the rest of the caulk . My projects are usually organized to stop when I finish a tube or start something else that will finish a tube . I know that sounds crazy but I hate wasteing this expensive caulking .

Stich 16d nail in nozzle and with nail against wall pull calk gun trigger so calk surrounds nail shank completely. Wipe nail head and exterior of nozzle clean. Take 3" piece of electric tape and center it on nail head with tape brought down firmly against nozzle sides. Repeat with tape at 90 degrees over first piece of tape. Then take electric tape and wrap around the first two pieces starting from nail head area down a couple inches on nozzle. Be sure that there is no way for air to enter at nail head area.

Store calking tube in dark cool location. Most calks last for up to a year. Have had 3M 5200 slow cure adhesive last for longer than three months for reuse.

eyschulman 02-09-2015 01:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kulas44 (Post 306093)
I drive a 1998 chevy suburban that has 310,000 miles on it. Although almost nothing mechanical on it has nearly that many miles. It has quit on me several times but never left me stranded. I have a LARGE tool box and every spare imaginable. I carry a suitcase welder and a small cutting torch. A 20 lb CO2 bottle with a regulator, mostly to air up a low tire, but also to run a few air tools. Etc. I am a little paranoid when it comes to mechanical devices.

Kulas44 so you must be a great mechanic, but you choose to drive a pretty crummy truck. Well I owned three since the late 1980s and still have one. It rattles it shakes it rusts and one needed a replacement motor paid for by GM. The only reason why we own one is my wife halls heavy horse trailers and the GMs have the heft, but not the quality definitely not a Toyota. Our 2004 HD 250 diesel has 24,000 miles and has complained all the way. Different folks different take on things just like boats.

Marin 02-09-2015 03:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by healhustler (Post 306069)
Great tip, Mule, but I'll need that caulk quickly thawed to seal the wounds I'll get when my Admiral finds it next to her truffles in the freezer.:eek:

A better technique, I think, is to cut a finger tip off a thin poly glove (surgical glove) tape the open end of the finger around the nozzle of the tube while it's still in the gun with a bit of space in the tip of the finger, and then squeeze the gun's trigger to fill the tip of the finger with caulk. Absolutely no air can get through the glove and the ball of caulk in the finger tip and the caulk will stay good in the tube for (in our experience) up to six months, no freezer needed. Particularly if you tape over the open end of the tube with electrical tape (not blue tape or duct tape because air can get through them over time).

We learned this tip from the shipwright who regrooved and reseamed our main deck many years ago and it has saved us a fortune in caulk costs over the ensuing years.

Pack Mule 02-09-2015 06:24 AM

We bought our boat 3 years ago for around 30k . It needed a lot of work and still needs a whole lot more . We budgeted 5 k a year for repairs because that's about all we can afford . We always go over at least $1000.00 or so . We do all our own work and it's a lot of it . it's something almost everyday . If it's not at the boat it's at the shop getting something ready to install or on the phone ordering materials . If you have the tools , funds , a good place to work and a damn good work ethic you can do it . Boat repair is not easy . We still have a long ways to go without any real end insight ,but we like doing this sort of thing . We always try to get big heavy stuff done before the season. We could not afford a cheap trawler if we had to pay for labor .
I've seen some buy a real piece of crap and not do anything to it . It depends on what you want out of it ,but it still has to float .


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:39 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012