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Old 11-25-2016, 12:41 PM   #42
Capt.Bill11
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City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,439
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
In my opinion using an avoided cost to justify a watermaker probably does not work out.

What does work out is that with a functioning watermaker you do not need to conserve.
  • If you want a 20 minute shower... Great.
  • If you want to wash the salt crusties off of the windows so you get a fantastic view...Great
  • If you want to do laundry at sea...Great.
  • If you want to spend a week or more away from port without worrying if you are running low on water...Great
  • If you do not want to drink municipal water with all of the chemicals, and impurities...Even Greater...

What I do is to take a couple gallon jugs and fill them up from the watermaker test outlet every day. That way we drink only pure, fresh water. Water that has never been in a tank. Water that is just water.

The convience factor that a watermaker provides is far greater than any dollar figure can describe. We boated for a long time without a watermaker. Now that we've gotten used to one, we cant imagine how things used to be.
You'r thoughts on how great RO water is appear to be based on at least a couple of fallacies.

One that pure RO water is the healthiest water you can drink.

And two that municipal water is automatically worse for you than RO water.

RO water tends to be acidic and totally lacking in minerals.
Two things that are not necessarily good for you.

"The production of water on ships can be associated with its own potential health problems. Ships can produce their own water by several different processes, such as reverse osmosis or evaporation of seawater. Desalination demineralizes seawater, which can make it more corrosive, shortening the life of containers and conduits. Desalinated water may also cause health impacts associated with insufficient minerals in seafarers' diets or the consumption of dissolved metals (e.g. lead, nickel, iron, cadmium or copper) from corrosion products. Desalinated water may also be considered bland, flavourless and unacceptable by passengers and crew."

http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/1...546690_eng.pdf
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