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Old 06-14-2012, 10:55 PM   #61
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I can't speak for California but the Manatee is not a popular boat model up here (PNW). In the 14 years I've been involved with diesel cruising I have seen exactly two of them. One lives in our marina and never seems to go anywhere and the other was on the guest dock for a few days a number of years ago.

Why the Manatee is not popular in our waters could be, I'm sure, the subject of another never-ending thread. SFO Bay could be a different story, however, I don't know.
I like the manatees. Lots of room for a 36' boat, although my looking is admittedly all via photos.

I think they would make a great boat for the inside passage. Calm waters for the most part. They probably just didn't market them well in the PACNW. The Bayliners, Tollys, and Uniflites were all local built boats with a strong presence in this area.
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Old 06-15-2012, 10:32 AM   #62
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BRUTUS, The 36 ft Krogen Manatee

Brutus is for Sale...Survey in hand..VESSEL IS TOTALLY SOLID...WOULD LIKE TO INVITE ANYONE TO SEE BRUTUS..With only "400 Hours" and the inside is like BRAND NEW...Please come and see it , and then write , what you have viewed...Thank You to ALL , and have a wonderful summer and SAFE TO ALL AT SEA...Bily
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Old 06-15-2012, 07:36 PM   #63
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I think they would make a great boat for the inside passage. Calm waters for the most part. They probably just didn't market them well in the PACNW. The Bayliners, Tollys, and Uniflites were all local built boats with a strong presence in this area.
The Manatee appears to be a poor configuration for docking at the typical bullrail docks we have up here. No side deck access and no fast path from the aft deck to the foredeck. If or when we are ever in the market for a different boat we would not consider any that did not have a full walk around main deck. The main deck and relatively low freeboard of the GB are two of its major advantages in our opinion, at least in the kind of boating and docking we do up here.
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Old 06-15-2012, 08:06 PM   #64
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The Manatee appears to be a poor configuration for docking at the typical bullrail docks we have up here. No side deck access and no fast path from the aft deck to the foredeck. If or when we are ever in the market for a different boat we would not consider any that did not have a full walk around main deck. The main deck and relatively low freeboard of the GB are two of its major advantages in our opinion, at least in the kind of boating and docking we do up here.
Interesting thought.

Here's another prespective...

I do the same kind of docking in Alaska as you are describing.

I've never had a boat with a full walk around deck, and never really wanted one. I've always been happy with the tradeoff of a much larger salon vs nice side decks.

I suppose that in a stiff wind blowing you away from the dock singlehanded operation might be a bit of a challenge, but with two people its a no rush situation. Secure the aft, power into the dock, and secure the bow.
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Old 06-15-2012, 09:23 PM   #65
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Everyone learns to cope with what they have. Boaters with no or minimal side decks learn to deal with it. Our smaller boat has no side deck to speak of and no easy access to the foredeck and we d
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Old 06-15-2012, 09:28 PM   #66
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Interesting thought.

Secure the aft, power into the dock, and secure the bow.
That's very much different to how we do it but perhaps you have a bow thruster.
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Old 06-15-2012, 09:57 PM   #67
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That's very much different to how we do it but perhaps you have a bow thruster.

You're getting blown away from the dock.

You pull up, and the line handler steps onto the dock from the swim platform, securing the line.

Then opposite to the dock engine in foward and the aft line helps pull the boat in.
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Old 06-15-2012, 11:26 PM   #68
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I nearly always pull up against the dock (of any design) broadside (in a slow forward motion with fenders in place) and then quickly stall the boat's forward moving momentum by shifts and throttle as necessary. We immediately place a short spring line. From that point front and rear line attachments are paint-by-number. With twin screw a boat can be made to do almost any maneuver desired. Short of really strong winds and/or current in process... even then if you get broadside for a short spring line attachment the remainder of berthing tie-up is easy!
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Old 06-16-2012, 12:09 AM   #69
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Side decks? I love 'em. Love my 360-degree deck.

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Old 06-16-2012, 12:23 AM   #70
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The main deck and relatively low freeboard of the GB are two of its major advantages in our opinion, at least in the kind of boating and docking we do up here.
??? GBs' freeboard is much higher than the Coot's. We step onto the boat: no need for stairs.

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Old 06-16-2012, 04:58 AM   #71
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You're getting blown away from the dock.

You pull up, and the line handler steps onto the dock from the swim platform, securing the line.

Then opposite to the dock engine in foward and the aft line helps pull the boat in.
As I said, we do it totally differently. We dock the boat like we dock the Beaver---- bow in at an angle right up to the dock, swing the stern in with opposing thrust and rudder, person steps to the dock with the midships aft spring, secures it, and we pin the boat to the dock with rudder away from the dock and inboard engine in forward. Works every time in any wind.
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Old 06-16-2012, 10:24 AM   #72
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They're pretty friggin' fugly too.

(Jealously rearing it's ugly head)
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Old 06-16-2012, 01:22 PM   #73
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If you understand line handling and spring lines...a singlehandler can dock almost anything...the one exception is when something (wind/current) is moving the boat just to fast for you to get from the wheel/controls to the line/cleat that you are trying to secure.

For Bily...what boats are LISTED for aren't even CLOSE to what they are SELLING for....ALL OVER......with a few exceptions....
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Old 06-16-2012, 01:54 PM   #74
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??? GBs' freeboard is much higher than the Coot's. We step onto the boat: no need for stairs.
I dunno. The distance from the dock to your gunwale in your photo looks the same as or even more than from the dock to our gunwale at our boarding gate. But compared to a lot of boats, both our boats have considerably less vertical distance to cover to step aboard. Course our floating docks up here tend to be higher than the thin floats used in many marinas elsewhere, so that helps, too.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:52 PM   #75
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Yeah, that dock you're parked at looks to be relatively tall.
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Old 06-16-2012, 04:09 PM   #76
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Yeah, that dock you're parked at looks to be relatively tall.
It was, as are most of the heavily built bullrail docks up here. Same thing in the photo below. So that definitely makes it easier to step aboard. But our GB (the hulls got taller after 1988) does have relatively low freeboard aft compared to many if not most other production boats of similar size.
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Old 06-16-2012, 07:38 PM   #77
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From Bily...To all, That have nothing nice to say !

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
The Manatee appears to be a poor configuration for docking at the typical bullrail docks we have up here. No side deck access and no fast path from the aft deck to the foredeck. If or when we are ever in the market for a different boat we would not consider any that did not have a full walk around main deck. The main deck and relatively low freeboard of the GB are two of its major advantages in our opinion, at least in the kind of boating and docking we do up here.
TO EACH HIS OWN ...Just think, ONE BOAT, ONE COLOR, ONE TYPE OF AUTO..But what we don't do is say bad thing about ONES CHOICES Dear Marin.and all that read this .I can, but "WON'T" tell you many things that they say about GB..

I wish you well and always SAFETY AT SEA...

Regards Bily
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Old 06-16-2012, 08:14 PM   #78
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I can, but "WON'T" tell you many things that they say about GB..
I've probably heard them all already. While we have one it's not our favorite boat, either. But it serves the purpose we need it to serve, at least right now.

The Manatee serves its purpose, too, for the people who want or need that kind of interior volume and who don't need the attributes it doesn't have. So I'm not saying it's a bad boat, just that it doesn't seem a good fit for the kind of boating we have up here. Just as the GB would be a poor fit for someone who wants to do long range, open ocean cruising.

I suspect that were your boat located on the east coast you would have a much better chance of selling it sooner rather than later as it seems a good configuration for the ICW, Loop, etc.
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Old 06-16-2012, 10:37 PM   #79
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I've probably heard them all already. While we have one it's not our favorite boat, either. But it serves the purpose we need it to serve, at least right now.

The Manatee serves its purpose, too, for the people who want or need that kind of interior volume and who don't need the attributes it doesn't have. So I'm not saying it's a bad boat, just that it doesn't seem a good fit for the kind of boating we have up here. Just as the GB would be a poor fit for someone who wants to do long range, open ocean cruising.

I suspect that were your boat located on the east coast you would have a much better chance of selling it sooner rather than later as it seems a good configuration for the ICW, Loop, etc.
A manatee would be a great loop boat.

Marin, while you're considering boats, you seem to have a soft spot for pilothouse boats, with some speed capability.

Have you ever looked at, I mean seriously examined, a Bayliner 4788. They are an extremely popular pilothouse boat that can cruise at 15 knots. Forget the name, and just look at the boat. They're not the same quality as the small ski boats. A whole different category indeed.
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Old 06-17-2012, 12:11 AM   #80
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Have you ever looked at, I mean seriously examined, a Bayliner 4788.
No. As I've said before, I don't care for what I call the "cabin cruiser" look. I like boats that have at least a degree of "workboat" in their lines. Bayiners, Tollycrafts, Uniflites, Carvers, etc., etc., etc. have no aesthetic appeal to me at all. My wife feels the same way.

This has nothing at all to do with their capabilities or build qualities. Like cars, I have no interest in owning a boat that doesn't possess the kind of aesthetics I like. The GB is certainly not ideal in this respect, but it does have a degree of the look we like. Bayliners, etc. do not.

I don't think they're ugly, I don't think they're good looking. They just are. Like Honda four-door sedans, Bayliners et al have no visual aspects that attract my attention. Large or small I don't notice them in the marina, in the yard, or out on the water (other than something not to run in to )

They are not boats that I see and think, "That's a cool looking boat," which is what I think when I see Carey's lobsterboat, Mark's Coot, Keith's Krogen, or Eric's Willard to name some on this forum. Or higher up the price scale a Fleming 55 or a deFever 46 (both of which share the same basic deFever design), or a Victory Tug.

The Bayiners, Tollys, Uniflites, Carvers, etc. are all great boats for people who like that style of boat and I don't hesitate to suggest them--- particularly Tollycraft---- as possibilities for people looking to get into a cruising boat. But they're not for us.
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