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Old 09-25-2017, 02:50 PM   #1
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1929 Steel Fantail MY

1929 Steel fantail MY.
78’ long
15.5’ beam
8.5’ draft
Fuel: 3500 Gal diesel
Water: 2000 gal.

This is a classic, plumb bow, knuckle stern, fantail MY built in 1929. Powered by her original Atlas Imperial 6 cyl. engine. 3 staterooms, full galley with dishwasher, built in refrigeration, coffe maker, toaster, and massive amounts of storage. Engine room has 8’ ceilings and full walk around main engine.

This is a project boat. She is presently sitting in a boat yard waiting for repair/refurbishment. Had a hull leak (did not sink) and was removed from water for repairs. I have realized this is a bigger project than I can handle and she needs to go to a capable party to bring her back to her full glory.

Asking $20,000

Email: indium987@yahoo.com
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Old 09-25-2017, 02:59 PM   #2
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Greetings,
Pictures?
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Old 09-25-2017, 03:27 PM   #3
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No photos, no links, nothing? Come on now.
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Old 09-25-2017, 03:33 PM   #4
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Riveted hull?
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Old 09-25-2017, 03:43 PM   #5
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Yes, riveted construction. Will post pics when I get home from work.

Also check out videos of the boat on my youtube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/biteme1167
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Old 09-25-2017, 11:52 PM   #6
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Pictures

Here are some pics of the boat.
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Old 09-26-2017, 02:50 AM   #7
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Looks like an ex government boat. I bet the insurance companies like the low ports.
Kinda typical older yacht, people went to a lot of effort inside and forgot about the bottom. Probably no zincs left. You need to check the hull thickness and underwater metal. Where the hull plates overlap can leak with age. There's a tool for beating the upper plate edge that puts a lip on it that digs into the lower plate and makes a seal. I think I have one. Not too hard with an air hammer. Riveted hulls give in heavy seas and don't get stress cracks like welded hulls. But rivets can go bad. Especially with no zincs because the rivets usually aren't quite the same metal as the plating. Like the controversy over the Titanic's rivets.
Atlas diesel for its age is a pretty reliable engine. There are people that work on them and make parts. Air starting and mechanical injectors, that's what the extra rockers and push rods are for. As I remember, you have to lube the pivot points every 4 hours. There's a hand pump to build fuel pressure before starting. Kinda bear to start in cold weather w/o some kind of block heater. The tank in front is an oiler with tubes going to parts of the engine.
Not a bad price if the bottom isn't shot.
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Old 09-26-2017, 07:06 AM   #8
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boatbum, $20,000 is a rather small return on whatever you invested. If you can demonstrate a strong, operable engine (all polished and pretty) then you might salvage half that on the engine/gear alone. Strip the rest of it and sell off. Finally sell off the steel to a scrap yard. Would be a big effort but a nice project.
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Old 09-26-2017, 09:26 AM   #9
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gorgeous! needs a spit shine, but I love all the boat below the water line and the longer hull. I wish there were more boats like that. Also, the wood and blue paint look great together.

someone's got their work cut out for them on this one though!
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Old 09-26-2017, 10:56 AM   #10
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I want that engine! My goodness!
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Old 09-26-2017, 01:23 PM   #11
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Repairing a riveted hull is a very specialized job. How many are around that can competently do that today? Lots of man hours.

https://maritime.org/conf/conf-dvorak.htm

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Old 09-26-2017, 03:44 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Paul in Saudi View Post
I want that engine! My goodness!
It can be yours for a mere $20,000, I'll throw in the moveable shed for free!!
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Old 09-26-2017, 03:51 PM   #13
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Thanks for all the comments.

Not looking to be a scrapper.

Yep, losing a lot of money on my investment , but I don't have the resources to finish her....so...

Most of what you see waterline and below is dirt from the bay. There are a few spots that need patching, but overall in remarkable shape for being 88 years old. The hull was coated with a plastic/epoxy coating by a previous owner.

Your getting a lot of boat for the money, and they don't make them like this any more!! Stand out from the crowd of production line boats and harken back to yesteryear!
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Old 09-26-2017, 09:14 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
Looks like an ex government boat. I bet the insurance companies like the low ports.
Kinda typical older yacht, people went to a lot of effort inside and forgot about the bottom. Probably no zincs left. You need to check the hull thickness and underwater metal. Where the hull plates overlap can leak with age. There's a tool for beating the upper plate edge that puts a lip on it that digs into the lower plate and makes a seal. I think I have one. Not too hard with an air hammer. Riveted hulls give in heavy seas and don't get stress cracks like welded hulls. But rivets can go bad. Especially with no zincs because the rivets usually aren't quite the same metal as the plating. Like the controversy over the Titanic's rivets.
Atlas diesel for its age is a pretty reliable engine. There are people that work on them and make parts. Air starting and mechanical injectors, that's what the extra rockers and push rods are for. As I remember, you have to lube the pivot points every 4 hours. There's a hand pump to build fuel pressure before starting. Kinda bear to start in cold weather w/o some kind of block heater. The tank in front is an oiler with tubes going to parts of the engine.
Not a bad price if the bottom isn't shot.

Even with anodes, rivets can suffer from crevice corrosion.But heck, the boat is close to 90 years old if it was going to occur, it would have long ago.
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Old 10-04-2017, 07:27 AM   #15
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Looks like some labor but it would be a labor of love.. The fact that it even moves for 20k is amazing.

I think some people here are over exaggerating the amount of work needed as well. Sure if you wanted to bring her back 100% then it would take alot of work but my boat isn't 100% and never will be.
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Old 10-09-2017, 11:20 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
Looks like an ex government boat. I bet the insurance companies like the low ports.
Kinda typical older yacht, people went to a lot of effort inside and forgot about the bottom. Probably no zincs left. You need to check the hull thickness and underwater metal. Where the hull plates overlap can leak with age. There's a tool for beating the upper plate edge that puts a lip on it that digs into the lower plate and makes a seal. I think I have one. Not too hard with an air hammer. Riveted hulls give in heavy seas and don't get stress cracks like welded hulls. But rivets can go bad. Especially with no zincs because the rivets usually aren't quite the same metal as the plating. Like the controversy over the Titanic's rivets.
Atlas diesel for its age is a pretty reliable engine. There are people that work on them and make parts. Air starting and mechanical injectors, that's what the extra rockers and push rods are for. As I remember, you have to lube the pivot points every 4 hours. There's a hand pump to build fuel pressure before starting. Kinda bear to start in cold weather w/o some kind of block heater. The tank in front is an oiler with tubes going to parts of the engine.
Not a bad price if the bottom isn't shot.
Could the seems be welded up?
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:24 AM   #17
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Maybe. Most likely not well. The iron manufactured in the 1920's was designed to be riveted and didn't have the carbon content or metal additives that modern steel designed to be welded has. I have surveyed quite a few riveted vessel over the years and the areas of concern is always the rivets themselves, not the butts or seams. The common fix would be to ring weld the rivets but my observation was that the process would accelerate the deterioration of the rivets due to dissimilar metals in the weld material causing galvanic corrosion. As noted the rivet material is already different from the hull material, welding makes it worse.
Its very difficult now to get a matching grade of steel to replace hull plates nowadays and even more difficult to find a master craftsmen riveter who can join it up.
Also on boats this age the interior piping is likely quite deteriorated and will likely require replacement in its entirety. I would be interested in the electrical system on the boat. Most likely was originally 220v DC. Very rare today.
The engine is a work of art.
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Old 10-11-2017, 06:28 AM   #18
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[QUOTE=sdowney717;595875]Repairing a riveted hull is a very specialized job. How many are around that can competently do that today? Lots of man hours.


It is also possible to weld new plates. Need a special welding pen and a suitable steel grade plate. If you are serious about buying the worth, you need to commission an NTD inspection through the entire body and lid so you know the thickness of the entire ship and you can budget the repair as needed. If zinc anodes are always taken care of, the hull can still be in very good.


this video welding old stel hull, 2009 Elbe tug dry docking.
https://youtu.be/ijjIGlQdV9U
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Old 10-20-2017, 12:13 PM   #19
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Please remember that this is a Classified Ad, not a discussion thread. The merits of a riveted hull can be discussed in a separate thread.

Thanks for retaining the integrity of this sales ad.
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