Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-09-2019, 07:33 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
KingBuffalo's Avatar
 
City: seattle
Country: United States
Vessel Name: The Lady J
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 27
Seaworthiness

Someone on here said that these boats look more seaworthy than they actually are. Is that true? Have any of you Bluewater owners been in heavy seas with your vessel? How did it handle it?
__________________
Advertisement

KingBuffalo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 08:16 PM   #2
Veteran Member
 
City: Kentucky
Country: United States
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 84
Which boats would those be?
__________________

slowgoesit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 08:20 PM   #3
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 4,767
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowgoesit View Post
Which boats would those be?
Bluewater.

Inland/Lake vessels.
menzies is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 08:35 PM   #4
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,851
Greetings,
Mr. s. Mr. KB mentions Bluewaters in his question. I think one can assume he, in fact, IS asking about Bluewaters.


Mr. KB. I always scratch my head when someone discusses seaworthiness. A dugout canoe is "seaworthy" in certain conditions and with able handlers. It's been mentioned many, many times on this site that a boat will probably be able to take rough conditions better than her crew but again, that depends on the crew.


I used to watch that crabbing program from Alaska and if I was out under those conditions in almost any vessel, I'd be sunk, literally.


I've been caught out in much rougher conditions than I planned for on a couple of occasions and the only thing it taught me was to pay closer attention to the forecasts. I'm a fair weather sailor for sure.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 09:35 PM   #5
Moderator Emeritus
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 4,465
Without ever even having been aboard a Bluewater 40 I can tell you that you could safely take your boat along any coastline as long as fuel stops are witnin your safe fuel range.

Enjoy your boat and when itís really snotty stay in port and enjoy life.

Iíd rather be sitting happy in port enjoying life than braving huge seas in any recreational boat.

Learn your and your boats comfortable limitations through practice and enjoy your boat.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 11:00 PM   #6
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
Bluewater.

Inland/Lake vessels.
You are referring to the Bluewater houseboats built in the US.

PO is referring to the displacement hulled Bluewater PH trawlers built in Taiwan in the 70's
syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 11:28 PM   #7
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingBuffalo View Post
Someone on here said that these boats look more seaworthy than they actually are. Is that true? Have any of you Bluewater owners been in heavy seas with your vessel? How did it handle it?
We've owned Sandpiper, a 1976 Bluewater, for 19 years. We have been boating 2 to 3 months during the summer for 18 years and have been up and down the inside passage with no issues.

We try to avoid being tossed around since we are not in a hurry but, we have been caught in some nasty seas crossing straits. The boat handles the seas well. It has good motion in heavy seas. I would not hesitate going anywhere in the boat.

We avoid beam seas by tacking.

Our favorite way to travel rough seas, when possible, is with a following sea. The boat handles following seas on autopilot tracking fairly straight.

The previous owner kept Sandpiper in California and drove it up the coast to the PNW, BC and Alaska for 15 years. He started mooring in Port Townsend in the 90's.

Instead of traveling on the east side of Vancouver Island, he always traveled on the west coast. I asked him why he didn't go through the calmer east side and he said traffic was too much and he didn't want to be bothered with calculating slack current through the narrows!
syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 11:37 PM   #8
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
Without ever even having been aboard a Bluewater 40 I can tell you that you could safely take your boat along any coastline as long as fuel stops are witnin your safe fuel range.
Our Bluewater with 600 gallons of fuel can travel at 8 knots for over 2,000 nautical miles.

Every Bluewater has different tank configurations. The boats were semi custom and there were many options for tankage.
syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 11:48 PM   #9
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 9,707
We own a Blue Water brand boat... but, I'm confident not the type of Blue Water boat to which the OP is referring. Ours is a cuddy cabin i/o play toy. Good boat!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Duke.jpg
Views:	61
Size:	137.9 KB
ID:	96274  
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 11:50 PM   #10
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,902
I haven't been on one, but the BW 40 pilothouse trawler looks to have a decent hull shape to handle some fairly rough seas. With the portugese bridge it looks a bit like a semi displacement version of a KK. If they were built anywhere near as well as a KK, they'd be a great sea boat.

The other version of a Bluewater 40 has a lot of glass up front which would concern me running into a big head sea. They have a lot of room inside to enjoy in protected waters.
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 11:21 AM   #11
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
I haven't been on one, but the BW 40 pilothouse trawler looks to have a decent hull shape to handle some fairly rough seas. With the portugese bridge it looks a bit like a semi displacement version of a KK. If they were built anywhere near as well as a KK, they'd be a great sea boat.
The 40 Bluewater is a ballasted round bottom, displacement hulled trawler.

It is 12 inches narrower than a KK42 and has a finer bow section.

There were several BW40 built with coring, like the KK but the majority of them had solid FRP hulls.

The BW40 was designed as a single screw but most appeared to have been equipped with twins.
syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 11:35 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
City: Owings, Md
Country: US
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
The other version of a Bluewater 40 has a lot of glass up front which would concern me running into a big head sea. They have a lot of room inside to enjoy in protected waters.
I suspect you are thinking of the Roughwater 41, which strikes me with the same impression.
Gdavid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 11:37 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Pete Meisinger's Avatar
 
City: Marinette, WI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Best Alternative
Vessel Model: 36 Albin Aft Cabin
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 258
My 36 Albin can handle WAY worse conditions than I or the Admiral. Five foot waves are about our limit, even then only when we get caught in them. We would much prefer to be snug and dry in a safe harbor. In fact, some of our favorite boating times have been sitting out storms and exploring by bike, foot or kayak.

Could my boat handle 10 foot waves ? Don't know, Don't care.. Wont be out in them. Is my boat "Seaworthy" ? I guess I would have to say yes. BUT...define "Seaworthy"

pete
Pete Meisinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 11:45 AM   #14
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 884
Quote - mine: The previous owner kept Sandpiper in California and drove it up the coast to the PNW, BC and Alaska for 15 years. He started mooring in Port Townsend in the 90's.

Instead of traveling on the east side of Vancouver Island, he always traveled on the west coast. I asked him why he didn't go through the calmer east side and he said traffic was too much and he didn't want to be bothered with calculating slack current through the narrows!



Forgot to mention that Sandpiper had paravane stabilizers when we bought it. I took the poles off when we acquired a boathouse.

PO deployed the fish as soon as he cleared the breakwater.

When we bought Sandpiper, I noticed a barrel chair in the salon with a seatbelt bolted to the floor. PO said his wife strapped herself in that seat when things got rough.

My wife made me take the seatbelt out. She said there was no way she would be able to sit there. She would rather be in the PH backseat driving if conditions were bad.
syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 12:48 PM   #15
Veteran Member
 
KingBuffalo's Avatar
 
City: seattle
Country: United States
Vessel Name: The Lady J
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 27
Syjos is correct, I am talking about the big ballasted trawler and not the houseboat. When I say “seaworthy”, I’m talking about its ability to handle rough seas. I read that this boat was designed for the Pacific Ocean, but does it possess the sea handling abilities of a Kadey Krogen? Will it handle the open ocean in bad conditions or is it really just a coastal boat?
KingBuffalo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 12:56 PM   #16
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 20,134
Words like "seaworthy", "bad conditions", "coastal cruiser", etc...etc are pretty meaningless unless parameters are discussed.

What is something to one person is something else to another.

If your boat can survive 7 foot seas, but the average crew gets so beat up to be fatigued to dangerous limits or flat out hurt...is that boat "seaworthy "?
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 01:08 PM   #17
Veteran Member
 
KingBuffalo's Avatar
 
City: seattle
Country: United States
Vessel Name: The Lady J
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 27
If I were to be that specific I’d have to ask 100 questions. I’m asking about the capabilities of the boat, not how it will handle very specific conditions.
KingBuffalo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 01:09 PM   #18
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 20,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingBuffalo View Post
If I were to be that specific I’d have to ask 100 questions. I’m asking about the capabilities of the boat, not how it will handle very specific conditions.
Then the answers should contain the specifics.....

And actually your first post asked about heavy seas..... an unspecific description.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 01:23 PM   #19
Guru
 
City: Boston
Country: US
Vessel Name: Adelante
Vessel Model: IG 30
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 677
A Grand Banks dory is seaworthy. Doesn't mean I want to cross the ocean in one.
Rule of thumb is a wave half the length of your boat can roll it over. Other than that, seaworthiness is directly proportional to your experience.

You could be out in a nice sunny 80* day, decide to enter inlet on an ebb tide, and end up in a broach. It's not the boat, it's the captain.
SoWhat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2019, 01:25 PM   #20
Moderator Emeritus
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 4,465
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Then the answers should contain the specifics.....

And actually your first post asked about heavy seas..... an unspecific description.
Heavy seas and rough water are terms with different meanings to different people, based on what their “normal” seas are for their cruising area.

If you are used to boating in protected waters “Rough Water” might be 4’ wind driven waves.

If you are used to boating in unprotected waters “rough water” might mean significantly larger seas.

My input to this thread was meant to put the concept of rough weather back on the captain, and somewhat remove it from the boat.

The reason is that pretty much any boat in the 40’ class can take the more movement than most captains. Another reason is that although some will passionately argue otherwise, most SD boats will perform similarly, and most FD boats will perform similarly.

In my opinion there is also a misconception around here that their particular choice in boat is somehow “better” performing than the other guys boat and frankly observing boats out at sea I just do not see it.

What I see is a dramatic difference in beam seas between stabilized and non stabilized boats, and I see a dramatic difference between boats at displacement speeds and boats that use horsepower to stabilize their boats. Observing most non stabilized true FD boats I see them being quite rolly polly.
__________________

__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×