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Old 06-29-2018, 04:12 PM   #1
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Power Cats for cruising

Does anyone think there's a market or demand for a power cat to make The Loop with or just go on extended cruises?

It would be around 37-41ft, displacement hull with twin diesels. I don't know if demand would dictate a 25 kt cruise or put some smaller diesels in and make it about a 15 kt cruise.

It would be stable at anchor, shallow draft for the ICW, make better speed than typical trawlers while keeping fuel burn low and have a low air draft for bridges.

The hope would be to build it nice, but not have a price point that 99% of the world can't afford. I've been looking at other power cats in production and they're $800k and more.

Would anyone here be interested in something like this.
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Old 06-29-2018, 04:27 PM   #2
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Does anyone think there's a market or demand for a power cat to make The Loop with or just go on extended cruises?

It would be around 37-41ft, displacement hull with twin diesels. I don't know if demand would dictate a 25 kt cruise or put some smaller diesels in and make it about a 15 kt cruise.

It would be stable at anchor, shallow draft for the ICW, make better speed than typical trawlers while keeping fuel burn low and have a low air draft for bridges.

The hope would be to build it nice, but not have a price point that 99% of the world can't afford. I've been looking at other power cats in production and they're $800k and more.

Would anyone here be interested in something like this.
I have always been interested in power cats and had searched them for quite a while. What held me up was price, beam accommodation at many sites, ability to take on weight without affecting trim & performance, and quality with some of the offerings.
Although not a problem on our list I think the general public also has issues with the typical limited cabin spaces.
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Old 06-29-2018, 04:29 PM   #3
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Greetings,
Mr. 86. I think there would indeed be a market for such a vessel IF the price point was attractive. Pretty well the ONLY beef I have with any cats I've been on is the difficulty in getting to the engines. I suppose, given the beam of each of the hulls, this is the nature of the beast. One could readily solve this "problem" by powering with outboards but that may introduce a whole other list of problems that I can't think of right now.
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Old 06-29-2018, 04:45 PM   #4
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One major push back for me would be the price of the slip at my marina. They would bill me the price for 2 boats.

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Old 06-29-2018, 04:59 PM   #5
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I have a power catamaran I had built. It is 48ft overall with a 23ft beam. Unless you want to compromise space in the twin hulls you will not get the fuel improvement you want, but still somewhat better than a similar length displacement monohull. Engine accessibility wouldn't be compromised if you don't use the hulls for staterooms. I have walk-around room in the engine compartments which are just over 6ft tall. Yes, always looking for an end-tie or mooring ball, but that isn't too big an issue in the PNW. Currently docked in a boat-house slip in Scappoose, OR.

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Old 06-29-2018, 05:20 PM   #6
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Outboards would be perfect as it would give you more room inside the hulls.

I think there is a boat on the market now that has a wide and a skinny hull, and only has one engine in the wider hull so it tracks straight. I thought that was pretty clever.
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Old 06-29-2018, 05:35 PM   #7
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PDQ Passagemakers are pretty frugal.
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Old 06-29-2018, 05:44 PM   #8
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These guys have something that might fit the bill. I don't know their prices, but it does seem that they are targeting the budget end of the market without too much compromise on style and fitout.

https://powerplaycatamarans.com/
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Old 06-29-2018, 05:50 PM   #9
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25 knots in a 40' displacement cat is pushing the limits of hull speed. Easy in a semi or planing cat but not real displacement hull cat. The organization I work for is looking into a displacement cat for use as a pilot boat. We are looking at speeds of 18 or so knots in a 40' displacement cat using two 170hp diesels.
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Old 06-29-2018, 06:15 PM   #10
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These guys have something that might fit the bill. I don't know their prices, but it does seem that they are targeting the budget end of the market without too much compromise on style and fitout.

https://powerplaycatamarans.com/
Taken the factory from Townsville to Pattaya now

Also see tiger rose has had a major haircut in price.
Pretty sure that was a $1.5 build?

https://yachthub.com/list/boats-for-...diesels/211219
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Old 06-29-2018, 06:18 PM   #11
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Would a beam of 14ft be too skinny?

I'd love to have a sub-$300k price point. I know where some molds are for hulls, I'd just have to reconfigure the top side. Having a mold for the hull would be a huge savings, which would pass along the savings.
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Old 06-29-2018, 06:22 PM   #12
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You could try a Endeavour 44. Many have used that as a "looper" and there are a few on the market at the moment.
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Old 06-29-2018, 06:29 PM   #13
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Aquila is the most successful moderate priced catamaran, been used for ages for chartering in the Caribbean. They have a 36' outboard version with a 15' beam and up to a 48' boat with a 24' beam.

I read of a family that did the loop in a catamaran and they loved it and can't understand why anyone would choose anything else. Especially they found the draft in their favor. Note that even the 48' Aquila has a draft of only 3'7".

There was lower priced catamaran company a few years ago that basically was a large, fancy pontoon boat but was chasing the low price customer. They faded away during the recession.
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Old 06-29-2018, 06:33 PM   #14
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PDQ made a 41 but had financial troubles. The market did not really take to cats. Most marinas are not set up to handle the huge beam.
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Old 06-29-2018, 06:54 PM   #15
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I read of a family that did the loop in a catamaran and they loved it and can't understand why anyone would choose anything else. Especially they found the draft in their favor. Note that even the 48' Aquila has a draft of only 3'7".
That's what I don't understand, people who ride on them love them, but the industry is so slow to accept change.



How wide are the slips that usually hold 40 footers? A 36ft Grand Banks has a beam of almost 13ft and the beam of the boats I'm looking to build are around 14, maybe slightly less.

I know the interior design has to be close to perfect in order for people to take hold of it, esp given the design challenges cats are known for. There's always compromises when it comes to finding a boat though.
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Old 06-29-2018, 07:12 PM   #16
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How about an asymmetrical power cat. http://aspenpowercatamarans.com/wp-c...g-March-09.pdf
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Old 06-29-2018, 07:36 PM   #17
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How about an asymmetrical power cat. http://aspenpowercatamarans.com/wp-c...g-March-09.pdf
Wow, that's impressive. That's wild that it's cheaper to build them in Asia then ship it to the US vs building it here.
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Old 06-29-2018, 08:43 PM   #18
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That's what I don't understand, people who ride on them love them, but the industry is so slow to accept change.



How wide are the slips that usually hold 40 footers? A 36ft Grand Banks has a beam of almost 13ft and the beam of the boats I'm looking to build are around 14, maybe slightly less.

I know the interior design has to be close to perfect in order for people to take hold of it, esp given the design challenges cats are known for. There's always compromises when it comes to finding a boat though.
Most slips for 40' are generally in the 16' range and as you move up to 60', you move up to 20-22'. So typically for a 24' Beam Catamaran, you're talking two 40-50' slips or you're talking a 70-80' slip. Either way you're paying double.

Now, the interesting thing is that when a transient, you're generally side tie and so the fit isn't a problem. Some marinas don't even charge extra and others charge 1.5 times the length price.

I think there are also some who believe catamarans not to be as good in rough seas. There's some truth to it, but then there are all sorts of catamaran designs.

I have a problem with the staterooms in the catamaran hulls. Even in the nicer ones I feel a bit claustrophobic. Would I adjust or just freak out worse? I don't know. I'd have to charter before buying.
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:41 PM   #19
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When we selected our KK Manatee, most of the boats on our short list were cats. Space, economy and draft were high on our list of priorities. If I wasn't so big and stiff, the PDQ 34 would have been our loop boat. Decent space, super efficient, separate shower, good galley and with a beam of 16 ft, not that bad for loop slips anywhere. Tight, but doable maintenance spaces. You still need to lie over the engines to change out the impellers though. The PDQ 41 is nearly as efficient with more capacity and a main deck master stateroom. A bit better in the service spaces and cavernous storage help but the cost is still out of our range. With a beam over 18', somewhat more difficult to get slips but if I could afford one I'd deal with it.

Endeavour 36 is an excellent loop boat and at mid 100's pricing, you get three staterooms and a big shower/head on a good economic platform. They are ugly and the bridge deck is a bit low, but maintenance spaces are reasonable. It's bigger sister 44 Trawlercat has a great full beam forward master and like the 36, a low profile for reduced windage and bridge clearance. The wider hulls make for more space in the rear staterooms and engine cells beneath the berths. Bob Vincent keeps improving the design here and there.

Endeavour also offers their 40 Sky Lounge and 38 Trawlercat with twin inboard diesels or gas outboards. Again, with beams of 16 ft., the slip challenge around the loop is much more manageable than most. Additionally, the 40 Sky Lounge is a genuine condo on keels. The 38 uses the same hulls minus the Sky Lounge's upper deck, giving it better windage and lighter overall weight for the hulls, probably improved economy. The outboards leave the former engine spaces empty for massive storage, but even with the inboard diesels, access is decent.

Other loop candidates in the 300 or below range would have to include the Fontaine Pajot 37 Maryland (maintenance really tight), a few custom makers and maybe the Leopard 37's now coming off charter leases. Worth mentioning are some of the damaged Leopard 47 charter cats coming from the Caribbean. They are cheap enough if you can find someone to repair them. If I was a bit younger, I may take on one of those myself, but trying to loop in one of those 47's, too wide. If not already, one might find an older Robinson & Caine 47 in the 300 range, not as efficient, but I think the beam was around 19 or so.

Lagoon 43's and 44's might fall in the 300 range, but feature two wet heads instead of separate showers, and even though the master is a gorgeous looking thing, the half-height ceiling idea just doesn't work for me. The boat slams in head seas and maintenance space is tight. It's good looking, but over 21' wide, not the best looper. There are a few Africats (great, but wide) and some custom makes that might qualify, but keeping under 300 and loop-able isn't that easy while still having enough room for what basically must become your home for a year. My 2 cents.
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Old 06-30-2018, 12:05 AM   #20
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Just so we're clear b because I think some people have the wrong idea, I'm not looking for a Loop boat. I'm looking to start my own yacht building company and build cat cruisers. I'm just wondering if there's enough demand to make my time worthwhile.

Side note, this cruiser wouldn't be the only boat I build. There's a lot of molds for sale and I'm wondering if picking up a bigger mold is worth while or if I should stick to just smaller fishing boats (a spot a lot of inshore charter captains feel has been abandoned by boat builders).
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