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Old 02-06-2019, 08:57 AM   #61
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I'm not an expert, but it seems that while the individual panels are heavier (possibly much heavier!), there's few/no ribs and few joints which saves a lot of weight. In theory strongall should be stronger due to the thicker panels and fewer joints, and the various expedition-level boats appear to bear this out although I doubt anyone has run the same style boat into a reef or an iceberg to test the theory!
I recall reading a comparison about the two methods but I don't remember the results or the source (I'm sure it's hard to get an truly unbiased comparison). I'd guess it would be pretty hard to get a room of experts to agree on "best" or "strongest" - but it would be amusing to watch them argue!
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Old 02-11-2019, 03:25 PM   #62
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Some very tangible progress! There are now two engines with reverse gear sitting in the shop! I grew up working on John Deere tractor engines and these are the first two JD's I've ever owned.

As much as I hated working on his engines as a kid, I'm sure my dad would be amused to see me buy two of 'em.
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Old 02-11-2019, 04:36 PM   #63
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Really interesting to watch!

Just for your information, our boat is aluminium too but uses the Strongall(TM) method (translated). Ours is 12mm hull and 6mm superstructure, minimal framing. I presume even more careful welding and skills are needed!
What's so special about the "Strongall" method that warrants a patent? Seems that it is just using aluminum that is about 3x thicker than you would use with traditional construction practices. Seems like a no brainer to me.
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Old 02-11-2019, 08:25 PM   #64
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What's so special about the "Strongall" method that warrants a patent? Seems that it is just using aluminum that is about 3x thicker than you would use with traditional construction practices. Seems like a no brainer to me.
I have absolutely no idea! I can only presume there's something new and patentable since it was granted, but I can't read French or even search for the patent.

As is the case over time, while the patent was created in the mid-1990's or so (25 yrs), technologies and techniques move on and it may not be sensible/practical still, or instead the concepts may be so obvious that the same patent wouldn't be gained today.
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Old 02-12-2019, 08:21 AM   #65
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My limited understanding of what makes this method different is not thicker plates. It is a combination of thicker plates with little (or no) internal framing and carefully place internal bulkheads that provides a boat that is not overall materially different in displacement (despite the plate thickness) but is stronger overall and faster to produce.

Their are some guidelines I recall - such as the waterline length in meters must be equal to the bottom plate thickness in MM - so a 12 meter boat has 12mm bottom plate. There are other guidelines that make up the "method".

I am not expert, but I listen to people who are. My understanding is this method produces a boat with stronger point load - so if you hit something the point of impact is less likely to be dented or damaged than on a traditionally constructed aluminum boat. However, the overall system strength is lower than on a traditional aluminum boat. On my boat (designed to Lloyd's Special Service Craft Rules - I'm sure I'm misusing that term, so any NA's can feel free to correct me) the combination of framing, longitudinal stringers, bulkheads, and plating is such that overall stresses on the vessel are spread among a carefully designed system of mutually supporting "stuff" and therefore are of less overall impact than on a boat that just uses heavy plate with minimal framing. In fact, if I wanted to increase the strength of my vessel, my first step probably wouldn't be to increase plate thickness but decrease frame spacing.

I can believe that Strongall might save construction time and cost - particularly labor hours since I assume there is a lot fewer feet of welding and with heavier plate, welding is easier. But I don't know anyone who produces both (or any NA's who are advocates of both methods) to ask for an unbiased opinion. I'm happy with my decision but I wouldn't look down on a Strongall boat for any reason; particularly if it was built for a specific operating environment and designed by an experienced NA.
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Old Today, 07:42 AM   #66
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I made another trip to US Workboats to check out progress. Hull skins are about 90% tacked in place. Once everything is tacked in place they will bring in welding crews to finish the weld-out. It's interesting to watch the process - to keep everything even and avoid twisting or distorting the hull, they keep everything balanced on both hulls. When they hang one skin, they move to the other side to hang the sister skin.

These are shots of the port and starboard hulls from the bow showing the spray chine.
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Old Today, 07:46 AM   #67
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A shot of my port engine room. Everything is tacked into place now. The hand drawn lines show where finish welds will eventually go.

An old habit from my Army life is ask questions and listen. But occasionally ask a question you already know the answer to so you can be on the lookout for BS. The production manager seems to know his stuff and they have a good QC process!
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Old Today, 07:48 AM   #68
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These are the awthartship frames forward of the collision bulkhead. They look pretty beefy - I think these guys have seen how I drive boats.
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Old Today, 07:51 AM   #69
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A shot of the tunnel with a human for scale.
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Old Today, 02:01 PM   #70
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Very interesting....Thanks for putting the effort into these posts.
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Old Today, 02:19 PM   #71
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These are the awthartship frames forward of the collision bulkhead...
Sorry, I should have said longitudinal frames. Big words always trip me up!
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Old Today, 02:49 PM   #72
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Loving the progress, THanks for sharing...
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