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Old 04-30-2017, 11:24 AM   #781
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Next week we may have some interesting news to share with everyone. Will keep you guessing for now.

John
Wifey B: I'm got it.....Sailor Blue is pregnant? Is that it?
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Old 04-30-2017, 11:48 AM   #782
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Wifey B: I'm got it.....Sailor Blue is pregnant? Is that it?
Nah, they decided to sell and have Helmsman build them a bigger boat. 5footitis ya know.
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Old 05-06-2017, 11:02 AM   #783
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Boat Test

Yesterday was a fun day with Mike Werling from Sea Magazine aboard for a boat test. I have written articles for Mike for the last nine years but we never met in person. After getting caught up and checking out the boat we started up the Cummins and motored to the bay for a few passes to record speed, RPM and fuel burn. As luck wouldn't have it we ended up doing this in the middle of a dang sail boat race which made things interesting. Mary and SB decided not to take the ride and took some great video of the boat from shoreline. It was a great experience and we look forward to seeing the article in a few months.

The Ottomans we ordered two weeks ago should be ready for pick up in two more weeks. Once these are aboard we should be done with interior. We are thinking about adding a removable aft deck sun protector for the afternoon sun which can really heat things when sitting outside.

We are exploring different dingy chocks and would appreciate any thoughts others can share. Thanks
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Old 05-08-2017, 07:24 PM   #784
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Tender

Today we received word from the folks at Gig Harbor that our boat will be lay up this week and delivery in time for the 4th of July dingy parade. We decided to add an extra removable rowing seat for the rare occasions I decide to get some exercise by rowing. Things are looking good so far.

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Old 05-08-2017, 11:19 PM   #785
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John,

I was nice to meet you last month, your boat is a beauty.
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Old 05-14-2017, 08:18 PM   #786
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A good day aboard

Sometimes the unplanned time aboard can be the best. We decided last minute yesterday to drive to the boat and spend the weekend. The weather turned out to be sunny but very windy so we quickly adapted to spending time aboard. Yesterday included walks along the bay (we enjoy the exercise) and a great bar-b-q chicken dinner using a recipe we forgot about for years, and yes a great bottle of wine.

Today we decided to go downtown to the convention center and check out the big boats. Boats up 200' can be found docked here. In between two large yachts was a Nordhavn 76 (funny how a 76'can look small). I noticed the name and quickly realized Mary and I spent a great evening aboard that boat in SD after she was commissioned and the crew was awaiting the owner to fly in the next day. That was ten years ago, wow how time has flown by.

If that wasn't enough we were stopped by a nice couple from AZ. who recognized me from a talk I did ten years ago at a trawler fest. Talk about a small world.

Jeddy emailed us and said the Ottomans would be ready next week. Looking forward to getting aboard. That's about it for this week. Work tomorrow but at least we are spending a few nights aboard.
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Old Yesterday, 05:03 PM   #787
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Lesson learned

What started out as a great planned weekend turned into another lesson learned. I took off work Friday to spend time with Mary and SB and get ready for a short run up to Mission Bay on Saturday. We also needed to be aboard for Jeddey to deliver the new ottomans which arrived around noon with fresh varnish still drying so we had to be careful handling them. They turned out great and fit perfectly.

With that out of the way we did a shopping for weekend and went to Old Town for excellent Mexican food. Anyone visiting SD needs to spend time checking out this great tourist spot. We planned to leave the marina by 0900hrs on Saturday to beat the strong afternoon stiff breezes and confused sea. We were running late and my ER check was rushed a little. Upon starting the engine we both noticed a slightly different sound so I immediately starting looking around. We had good cooling water exiting and instruments looked normal. Then I noticed the large red warning on the instrument control panel, it said check starboard engine. I attempted to obtain more information from the panel by scrolling through but I couldn't retrieve anything. This took about one minute then I shutdown the engine. I was confused since all my instruments showed normal operation. I thought possibly a false reading and turn the engine back on. The warning came on immediately and I quickly shut everything down before visiting the ER. As soon as I opened the door I smelled fuel ( never good) and looked at the engine to find a over a half gallon of fuel in the drip pan.

First thing I thought was where is it coming from? Before investigating I told Mary what I found and thought safety first. While I know diesel is not as flammable as gasoline I didn't like having that much in the drip pan and fumes so I shut down most electrical breakers and held off turning on the exhaust blowers. I was able to quickly diagnos the leak was on the engine port side, but from where? I decided to call Scott who was at TF but still picked up the phone. It didn't take Scott more than two minutes to ask me if the fuel return line was open. Dang it, I forgot to open it last week after tightening a valve that was seeping a little. With the cause of the leak known, it was time to understand the damage. Did I blow the fuel pump gasket and get fuel in the oil? Needless to say I was pissed at myself and thinking what this may cost me. After checking the oil and not seeing any fuel I felt a little better but still concerned.

I told Scott I needed to remove the fuel and then call him back. Fortunatly I had easy access to the drip pan which contained 100% of the spill and had all the fuel out within ten minutes. We then ran to West Marine for a few items including a small plastic fuel tank to pour the fuel into until I could dispose of it. Once back in the ER I was able to trace the leak to the fuel return line at the engine. It turned out the single clamp holding the rubber hose was not super tight and the connection not 100% allowing for the fuel to leak out under pressure. In other words I had a pressure relief valve of sort which saved the day. After a little more cleaning I tighten the hose connection and started the engine. Perfection! No leaks and no warnings. An hour later (after rechecking the oil) we ran the boat for 30 minutes on the bay and everything looked fine.

Lesson learned for me is to tag anything left in a nonoperational position and slow down while performing ER checks. More on how the design of the ER really showcased itself.

John
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Old Yesterday, 05:24 PM   #788
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I admit to being a little paranoid about that very problem. Our engines don't do well if you close the return line. You were fortunate. I am always very careful when I mess about with the fuel manifold. I check and double check to ensure I have it setup correctly before I leave the boat. More so since being tall and since the manifold is below the primary filters, the valves are not super easy to see without getting down on hands and knees.
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Old Yesterday, 05:40 PM   #789
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A couple of tricks that might help.....

1) Just remove the handles. I have all my return valve handles removed. It takes a concerted effort to close one. But it does leave you exposed to then forgetting to re-open it if you do have to close it for some reason, like your repair.

2) I have also color coded my fuel valve handles using colored electrical tape. Green valves should always be open. Red valves should always be closed. That makes it real easy to confirm everything is set correctly. Yellow valves are expected to be operated as part of running the boat. So you should never find yourself operating anything other than a yellow valve. And if you find your hand on a red or green valve, you need to stop and explain what exceptional circumstance is causing you to do that.
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Old Yesterday, 05:51 PM   #790
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A couple of tricks that might help.....

1) Just remove the handles. I have all my return valve handles removed. It takes a concerted effort to close one. But it does leave you exposed to then forgetting to re-open it if you do have to close it for some reason, like your repair.

2) I have also color coded my fuel valve handles using colored electrical tape. Green valves should always be open. Red valves should always be closed. That makes it real easy to confirm everything is set correctly. Yellow valves are expected to be operated as part of running the boat. So you should never find yourself operating anything other than a yellow valve. And if you find your hand on a red or green valve, you need to stop and explain what exceptional circumstance is causing you to do that.
Smart!
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Old Yesterday, 06:49 PM   #791
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What started out as a great planned weekend turned into another lesson learned.

John
John - Glad you located problem and provided solution!

Unless I'm incorrect ...exhaust blowers you mention are supposed to always be with a sealed electric-ignition. That is so diesel and/or gasoline boats' captains can turn on the bilge blower for ten minutes before starting anything inside a closed-off ER. Gives time for fumes of high enough consecration for explosion to be amply evacuated so that explosion does not happen when a non-sealed spark maker has power supplied.

Maybe - in your diesel boat the blower's sealed electric-ignition is not required due to much less chance of diesel fume explosion than gasoline fumes. I bet your exhaust fans [bilge blowers] do have sealed-ignition qualities.

Cheers!

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Old Yesterday, 07:13 PM   #792
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Motors, switches, etc do not need to be ignition protected unless there is a gas engine involved
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Old Yesterday, 07:57 PM   #793
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Motors, switches, etc do not need to be ignition protected unless there is a gas engine involved
I thought all ER fans that are officially designated as "bilge blowers" were ignition protected by law. In that a "bilge blower" primary intent/use is to evacuate over loads of explosive fumes... be they gasoline or otherwise.

From what I've learned over many years, although very seldom this circumstance occurs, with special circumstances definably required... diesel fuel can become vaporized amply enough to have the vaporized molecules ignite via a spark when in heavy enough concentration. Of course gasoline fumes can easily become saturated into air... very, very much easier than diesel.

With all that said: It may be that in diesel boats the manufacturers do not install officially named "bilge blowers"... but rather they install what is simply termed an evacuation fan [a nomenclature I believe was mentioned in other thread] that does not have protected ignition design.
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Old Yesterday, 08:08 PM   #794
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During my refit we installed "Delta T" fans in the ER. Quality, and high performance. They are ignition protected. I would not have had them otherwise, irrespective of whether someone says ignition protection is not needed for diesel ER's.

I would regard fitting fans/blowers that are not ignition protected as poor practice.

There are sources of flammable/explosive vapours in boats apart from engine fuel, which can easily enter the bilge and ER. Including insect sprays with hydrocarbon propellant. Those things will trigger my propane alarms.
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