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Old 12-31-2018, 05:35 PM   #21
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I looked at the Camano and liked the ability to run at a faster speed but I agree with Jim the side decks are too skinny. Going forward underway would be dicey. I purchased an Island Gypsy 32 Europa and love. Brought it down the Tom Bigbee waterway all the way to St Pete Beach area. But all said the Camano is still a cool little boat for 2.
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Old 01-01-2019, 12:41 AM   #22
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Interesting thread, my wife and I thought we would be happy with a Camano 31. We are in Bellingham WA and wanted a bridge boat to do San Juan Islands, BC Coast, then when we retire in 6y, move up. In our journeys I we connected with Jason, who took us out in his Camano 31. I learned that for right now, 6-8 kts was just TOO SLOW.

We've narrowed our search down to 30 ft Tollycrafts. since you know these boats Im a little puzzled why a 34 or even a 37 Tolly didnt make your short list. Cheers
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Old 01-01-2019, 02:34 PM   #23
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You're not limited to 8 kts in a Camano. If I remember correctly our Camano would do 16 kts at full throttle. Fuel consumption does go up however.
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Old 01-02-2019, 03:22 PM   #24
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During some Admiral-directed house cleaning last weekend I ran across some handouts from Steve Zimmerman's Boat Buying class at Bay Bridge 2016 Trawlerfest that address matching cruising plans to hull shape and boat size. Cliff Notes: 1 category regarding hull shape is intended cruising - length of cruises, distance from shore, etc., with another category indicating full displacement if you're going on voyages of over X# of miles off shore and longer cruises in open ocean, and semi-displacement for shorter cruises, lesser distance from shore, and planning hulls for day trips, maybe an occassional weekend trip, and very little time offshore. The segment of the evaluation included length of cruise and number of people with X% of the time only two leading to 30' to 35' boats, and more time and more people leading to a bigger boat. Speed/length also is noted on the summary chart. Using both scales and questions/answers from those in attendance afterward affirmed my predetermined strong inclination to buy a Camano 31, and so far I've had only two folks on board at a time, including me, but did do Bristol RI to NC when I bought it, two daylight passages to split the NJ segment into managable days. Almost on cue the weather off NJ kicked up both days so we got to strongly affirm the wisdom of taking the NJ segment in 2 roughly 10 daylight passages, whereas a larger boat, full displacement hull would have been better for running the entire segment in one day/night cruise. Delaware Bay provided another example of how fast conditions can worsen in 7 or so hours of a building strong stern wind. Speed/Length was also given some consideration. By comparison, NC inland waters have so much open water that has numerous nearby rivers and other places to duck in out of high winds, that smaller trawlers work great anywhere in NC.

Steve was so helpful during his seminar, and I suspect that you could contact him for the handouts - proprietary, I suspect. I look forwad to taking another seminar from him the next time I go to Trawlerfest (diesel engines), hopefully on the Chesapeake this fall, when it is announced. The boat buying seminar is well worth the cost to help avoid buying the wrong boat! (Steve's company also does pre-purchase surveys.)

So, I do recommend Steve's cruising boat buying seminar for his analysis of important considerations for hull shape and size of boat. I would add draft as a consideration in home and planned cruising waters. My target range is top of the Chesapeake to Charleston, but mostly not often south of Morehead City - ICW is mostly a ditch below Morehead in NC/SC, although with some worthy Ocean daytime segment opportunities in very good weather below Wilmington. For those target waters, the Camano seems perfect - draft, ability to crank it up to run to protected weather, and cruising comfort for 2 people. The saying about Camanos, "Entertains 6, feeds 4, sleeps 2" certainly applies to most day trips and longer cruises I intend to make.
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Old 01-17-2019, 10:27 AM   #25
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I could not agree more with the positive posts here respecting the Camano.

We regularly cruise with three on board and are quite comfortable - we did ten days in September to Desolation Sound and it was fine. I would have no issue with two couples but have yet to try it.

We have had as many as 7 on board for a harbour cruise and lunch in light seas - a great day and with folks generally split between the cabin and the bridge, space was fine.

As far as skinny side decks: if we have reason to go forward we just throttle back but really, there is never anything absolutely urgent requiring us to do so. Beyond that you just need a PFD on and to use a bit of care.

For us the Camano has been a fantastic choice.

-Chris
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Old 02-09-2019, 06:58 PM   #26
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Thank you everyone for your replies. I am confident the Camano's size and accommodates will work for my intended use. Perhaps to keep this thread going.

How do you Camano 31 owners feel about the seaworthiness of your boats?

I recently got a ride on an Albin 31 and was impressed on the ride quality. The Albin was obviously larger, heavier, faster and a lower center of gravity than the Camano but the owner had the utmost confidence in his boat's sea handling and I felt it as well.
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Old 02-09-2019, 07:44 PM   #27
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I'm pretty happy with the see handling on the troll. For comparison, I owned a mid 80's 35' chinese trawler and an 88 4388 bayliner. Each had its issues, good and bad. The trawler had a pretty round bottom and would roll...a lot. Not so you were in danger, but enough that your deck chair would slide across the boat. It had a square stern and got beat up a little by even moderate following seas.
The Bayliner had a harder chine and less dead rise, at least in the back half of the boat. Better ride than the trawler, and frankly better than a lot of pretty nice boats i've been on. Very little roll, relatively speaking. One issue was that it was a "wet" boat. In even modest seas we'd take LOTS of water over the bow and up onto the windshield. For novice boaters, including my wife at the time and most guests on board, that can be pretty disconcerting. If you compare that 4388 to the 47's or even 38 bayliners, its got a much lower bow, no doubt to minimize the sight loss as the boat came up on power. It took following seas better than the trawler or the troll

The troll is ok in following seas, but being relatively short, if you're not on your game at the wheel, you can get snapped around pretty quick. But if you pay attention, you do pretty well. Its also a "dry" boat. Very seldom get any appreciable water past the bow. Since its shorter, it goes up and down a lot in anything 3 feet or more. Hell, even 2 foot seas can keep you on your toes.
Overall, I feel pretty positive about the troll. Not the best, but way better than lots. In the end, I don't care what boat I'm on...if I'm headed past Point Wilson on an ebb tide with a westerly wind, I'm going to be nervous as hell and prepared to get knocked around.

Troll has been a good choice so far. Lots of well built stuff that you only realize when you compare it to some of the other stuff I've cruised around in.
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Old 02-10-2019, 01:06 AM   #28
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The Camano is capable of more than I'm willing to take. The worst we were ever in was from Point Wilson across Juan de Fuca. Half way across we went from dead calm to 5 ft to 6 ft seas and 30+ kt winds. We were taking water over the flybridge and anything that was loose hit the floor. It lasted for 20 minutes and then went calm again. The boat had no problems and I never felt we were in danger.
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:16 PM   #29
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Quote:
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The Camano is capable of more than I'm willing to take. The worst we were ever in was from Point Wilson across Juan de Fuca. Half way across we went from dead calm to 5 ft to 6 ft seas and 30+ kt winds. We were taking water over the flybridge and anything that was loose hit the floor. It lasted for 20 minutes and then went calm again. The boat had no problems and I never felt we were in danger.
been there, done that on our old 4388 bayliner. As you say, the boats can take more than we can. As we pulled in to Victoria, I looked over and my wife was standing in the galley crying. I asked what the matter was, and I got an earful, including "I am NOT motoring back...call me an airplane or helicopter...anything that is NOT on the water." Took me almost the whole vacation to convince her.
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:23 PM   #30
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A friend has one and he and his wife have spent up to 5 months living and cruising on it in the PNW. They NEVER have overnight guests, however.
It wouldn't work for me personally because of the down galley...just never liked them. IMHO, you shouldn't consign the poor cook to a separate isolated workspace with no view! I much prefer an "up galley." We bought a Grand Banks 32. Really like the "back porch" and the wide side decks, very safe-feeling for us older folks. And, of course, we like the traditional look of the GB.
Fair winds and calm seas
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:56 PM   #31
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A friend has one and he and his wife have spent up to 5 months living and cruising on it in the PNW. They NEVER have overnight guests, however.
It wouldn't work for me personally because of the down galley...just never liked them. IMHO, you shouldn't consign the poor cook to a separate isolated workspace with no view! I much prefer an "up galley." We bought a Grand Banks 32. Really like the "back porch" and the wide side decks, very safe-feeling for us older folks. And, of course, we like the traditional look of the GB.
Fair winds and calm seas
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Ha...if you cook like I do, everyone wants me in the down galley.
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Old 02-11-2019, 02:06 PM   #32
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TollyLucia,

You mention you have a Tollycraft? Why don't you put that in service?

Regardless of boat, I could argue not to have two (if you can) and not to store one for a year while you run off to Spain. But if you absolutely must, arrange for someone to use it.

As for Florida summers... they're HOT. I rarely try to run the AC during the day. Just open up everything and enjoy the breeze.
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Old 02-11-2019, 08:56 PM   #33
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There have been several good posts on other links on TF about hull design, one recently about displacement hulls. Check those out. Autopilots react but don't anticipate. Switching to manual steering on Delaware Bay around 3' stern waves helped a lot, as they built to well over 4' and I spent 8 hours at the wheel....slept well that night! A flat stern is lifted by a wave. A round or canoe stern is not lifted as much. A large wave can move a flat stern boat toward a broach. It's worth learning how to handle stern waves from some old salts or from US Power Squadron courses/instructors. Chapman's also is a likely good first step to learn more. Most importantly, know your weather forecasts before leaving home port, and let your experience level help you determine what weather you want to take on. Start with "bluebird days", light winds, and learn by practicing near home port. Take all the US Power Squadron courses you can take, on line and in person. If you choose a Camano, find some other local Camano owners for their experience in various weather, docking, etc, conversations. Having said that, there are plenty of good reasons that right now there are only 11 Camano 31s on the market out of a run of 262 or so hulls made, with the prices holding up very well, too. These are great boats, but no boat will exceed expectations without good training and planned practice/drills. Same goes for maintenance...learn before you need help. Lastly, gas boats are more dangerous than diesel boats. Learn the difference, and take good note of what fuel serious passagemakers use for long blue water cruising. Do you really want to be cooking on a gasoline fueled boat? I'm delighted with my Camano. Never looked carefully at more expensive (roughly 2x for same age/hours) Nordic Tug 32/34s, but the dockmates with those are very happy. Best idea is to join the Power Squardron, take courses, go slowly about making a purchase decision. Trawlerfest 9 months before I bought my Camano was a wise choice, and a Steve Zimmerman course helped me decide what to buy - matching my intended uses to hull type, size using charts he shared in the class. From those, I knew I was on the right track in choosing a Camano for my intended uses - coastal cruising in North Carolina's mostly inland waters, the Chesapeake, etc.

One more thing - read a volvo engine manual. Mine suggests not running wide open throttle beyond a certain amount. A recent PassageMaker article by Steve Zimmerman addressed engine longevity with comments on how often runs at more than 30% engine capacity, etc. If 12 kt means a whole lot to you, do you want to run at 80% of engine capacity? Or do you want a different kind of boat designed for a steady diet of 12 or whatever kt? My intended crusing between 6.5 kt (practical hull speed) and 7.8 max "cruising speed" works well with a Camano. I rarely run more than 30% of a day over 7.8 kt.

Best wishes for a fun process of learning about hull shapes, engines, fuels, and what your intended uses uses mean in terms of choosing the right boat for those uses.

After having read what I've written so far, the smartest thing I did was go to Trawlerfest and take a Steve Zimmerman class about what to ask when buying a new boat. I thought by having had 3 sailboats and 2 powerboats previously, I was ready to buy a trawler. Wrong. Steve bridged the gap for me, and I subsequently moved forward carefully and more confidently.

Alex
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Old 02-11-2019, 11:06 PM   #34
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Same chain of events here!

Funny, I attended Trawlerfest in Stuart roughly two years ago and took the course with Zimmerman. Only took me a few months after to find my way to the Camano.
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