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Old 11-23-2015, 06:29 PM   #21
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23k is like buying a new Toyota Corolla. If you can handle the other expenses, could be a good way to enjoy the water. Do your homework and money math, don't worry about foot temperature.
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Old 11-23-2015, 07:07 PM   #22
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Captainhead??? I think is the right screen name owns a 42' GB woodie in your general area. I'd send him a pm and offer to treat him to lunch or dinner and talk wood boat maintenance with someone who's been doing it right and by himself for a VERY long time.

Good luck
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Old 11-23-2015, 10:25 PM   #23
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I had a sailboat friend who had a beautiful wooden boat that was his pride and joy. One day a power boater ran down the St. Johns river and waked the marina where his boat was kept. It sank with 15 minutes to the bottom of the river, still in her slip. It turned out that some bug had eaten the calk in the joints, and his boat was being waterproofed by it's beautiful paint job... Heartbroken, he said at least it didn't happen offshore.

One marina in Merritt Island requires the owner to post a $10k bond to haul a wood boat. they say that it is required since old boats get abandoned, and that's what it costs to dispose of the remains.
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Old 11-23-2015, 11:12 PM   #24
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Just remember two famous sayings: "It's all about the price" and "There's an ass for every seat."

If the boat surveys in great condition (previous owned dumped all his hard earned money into it) and if you can buy it for a killer price, then how can you go wrong? Maintain it correctly and enjoy!

If you pay a low price and maintain it then it certainly can't depreciate any further.

But if are thinking about bringing it permanently to Florida or the Carib, then you might want to re-consider.
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Old 11-24-2015, 01:12 AM   #25
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Is it difficult to sell a wood Grand Banks?

For the record I own a 1973 wooden 32' GB. If I wanted to hose it off and go then a plastic boat would be fine. I don't.

Boating is an interactive experience, working on Ebbtide, being proud of how she looks and being part of the community is all part of that.

As for all the BS about insurance, yards and maintenance...if you don't live in that world you don't have a clue. These boats are insured, enjoyed and maintained every day around the world.

If that boat talks to you, passes a thorough survey and meets your budget then make an offer and get busy enjoying life.

If you ever get up this way look me up and I will show you what it's all about.

Bob
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Old 11-24-2015, 07:03 AM   #26
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Here in Fl its hard to give a wooden boat away.

The Canadians up on the lakes are great fans of wood , as well as gasoline as fuel.

With a limited season the boats are shed stored , so are exposed to the elements far less.

With 100% constant care wood is just fine , but the wood boat then becomes the hobby , not boat living or cruising.

Maine also has areas where wood is accepted .

Not too many folks prefer wood maint to cruising so the market is limited , even for Gold Plated boats.

The wood exception is tiny runabouts (Gar Wood style ) in pristine condition and of course the

Trumphy House Boats , the corperate folks have to be seen in, which are fabulous to be aboard.
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Old 11-24-2015, 11:45 AM   #27
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FF wrote;
"With 100% constant care wood is just fine , but the wood boat then becomes the hobby , not boat living or cruising."

Don't be ridiculous.
Wood boat owners spend more time on maintenance. Probably more than a little bit but probably not much more than that. But something never considered here is that skippers in the 50's knew a lot more about wood boat maintenance. In the 50's skippers did a lot of boating including trips to Alaska from Puget Sound. They spent most of their summer enjoying their boats so your implication that they spent all their time sanding and painting is .... ridiculous.
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Old 11-24-2015, 12:04 PM   #28
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Is it difficult to sell a wood Grand Banks?

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Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
Wood boat owners spend more time on maintenance. Probably more than a little bit but probably not much more than that. But something never considered here is that skippers in the 50's knew a lot more about wood boat maintenance. In the 50's skippers did a lot of boating including trips to Alaska from Puget Sound. They spent most of their summer enjoying their boats so your implication that they spent all their time sanding and painting is .... ridiculous.
Well...one other factor is that the wooden boat world has gone in two directions: the very visible "fine" one with varnish, brass, shows, and so on. And that is clearly a maintenance-intensive route. But there are also a lot of painted wooden cruisers. Some ex work boats. Some production. Some "custom". This is a world in which the boat's value can hover in the positive range but immediately turn negative and become a net liability. The drive to insure all boats in marinas has added to the pressure, and these are the boats to truly stay away from. "Free like a (toxic) puppy" comes to mind.

Finally, some times boats in the "fine" category fall into disrepair and end up in the lower strata. Getting them back up requires money and - often - lack of sound judgement.


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Old 11-24-2015, 12:30 PM   #29
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We are looking at a wood boat now,but only if we can sell our present boat. We're not afraid of it but our fear is that something will happen to me before I get a chance to sell it or give it away and Joy will be stuck with the burden of getting rid of it .We have been downsizing some latley (getting rid of stuff we don't use or need) and this wood boat for us is not inline with this way of thinking, come to think of it I probably wasn't thinking straight when I bought any of my boats ,they all needed a bunch of work but we sure do and did love them . If you love it enough to buy it someone else will also. It might take a while and you will probably loose some money if not all.
Being able to take the boat out and enjoy it while you're keeping up with it was a big deal for us . Good luck with your decision .
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Old 11-24-2015, 03:52 PM   #30
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"They spent most of their summer enjoying their boats so your implication that they spent all their time sanding and painting is .... ridiculous".

Take a good look at your 50 & 60 era Yachting mags.

Most boats were wood ,( a few steel) built to an owners specification.

Most at about 55-60+ had a cabin for a "man" the gent that lived aboard and did the endless maint.

As A kid on City Island NYC there were half a dozen yards doing new builds , Minnefords , Consolidated and others .

I got to meet a few folks whose total job was maint of the owners vessel.

Only a few could captain the vessel , but the boats sure looked as if they should be in a bottle , far better than the big charter boats that rent in the Carib.

Believe me , if you had a 60 ft Trumhpy , you purchased supplys , but never cleaned (or used) a varnish or paint brush, ever.
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Old 11-24-2015, 04:39 PM   #31
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Quote:
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Believe me , if you had a 60 ft Trumhpy , you purchased supplys , but never cleaned (or used) a varnish or paint brush, ever.
If you had the wherewithal to buy a Trumpy of course you'd have help to do the maintenance. Just like if you had the funds to buy a McMansion on the beach you'll have helpers (pool boy, lawn maintenance, cleaning ladies, etc.) and possibly a chauffeur to drive the kidlets to school.

Trumpys were not bought by folks living on a financial edge. Ditto the old Hatts, Burgers.

I suspect most 60'ers and up have crew quarters in their design. Someone is taking care of the boat and the owners when they are aboard.

The owner might do things aboard because he gets pleasure from solving a problem. Changing the oil? Not likely. There are jobs worth hiring out and I suspect as the available funds increase the likelihood of work being contracted out.
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Old 11-24-2015, 04:55 PM   #32
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I suspect most 60'ers and up have crew quarters in their design.
Although today's brokers refer to it as a "guest cabin" the original promo material for the 53' Hatteras referred to the "up down" in the bow forward of the galley as the crew quarters.
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Old 11-24-2015, 05:45 PM   #33
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I bought an old wood 33 footer in 1990 for 9k in my mid 20's. Owned it five years and had a blast with it. Did minimal maintenance, but did not let it slide downhill too much. And ran it A LOT. Sold it for 5k. No issues at all with it being a woodie. 1k per year depreciation. Maintenance, dockage, fuel, pretty cheap. Insurance?? WTF is that??? Hey, I was in my 20's!!!

In todays dollars, not far from what OP is looking at.

Funny thing is some dude called me up a month ago and asked me about the engines on my long gone boat. It is still in one piece and he needed advice on getting the injector pump rack unstuck on one of the old Mercedes OM352's. Blew my socks off hearing that thing was still around. Called me the next day and said both engines were running fine. He intends to fix the boat up. Wow.
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Old 11-24-2015, 11:32 PM   #34
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Prolly not too hard if you sell it really really really cheap.

There's two attractive wood boats for sale on our float. A 32GB for $24 and a 37 Chris w twin yanmars for $19. The Chris was $29. They may both be good boats.

If I was in the market for a boat I would consider either of these but the'd have to pass a very through survey and be cheap .. like these. I'm betting the GB could be had for less. Here's the Chris.
Eric - Pretty ol' Chris. 1940's???
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Old 11-27-2015, 11:06 AM   #35
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Some here are fond of saying that posters don't know anything and just repost dock talk. Remember that folks here are representative of the market for boats in general so their collective opinion, even if wrong, represents what a wood boat seller faces.


IMO if you don't know the terms scarfing, refastening, sistering, rib, caulking iron, and many others and how to do them or have an open wallet wood is not for you.
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Old 11-27-2015, 11:47 AM   #36
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Few years ago I was offered a 42' GB woody For Free by the executor of a will. First it was $20K... then $5K... then Free - to me; because it was his dad's and the family wanted it to survive. It was afloat at a very up-town Yacht Club. Reasons: Family tried to sell it on CL for a while. Then executor learned of my capabilities for way back decades of owning and working on wood boats. When he used the "free" word, I simply had to take a really good look at it, although I did not want a wood boat at the time.


Results: (I performed a several hour survey of my own on the GB)


- Fuel tank leaks (seeps)
- Teak deck screw plugs missing / calking shrunk or missing / warped deck areas
- Leaks on interior celings of all three cabins... from teak decks. Soma soft spots and black mold
- Bow stem rot
- Transom corner rot
- Need for much electrical redoing
- Bottom had never been refastened


There were some good points too... but not enough for me a years ago expert for working on wood boats to accept it even for free.


Before you purchase make sure you have a real good surveyoy review it first. And, then, be ready for a lot of annual work... with much work for the first year or two.


Good Luck! - Art


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Old 11-27-2015, 11:53 AM   #37
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Art re your post 34.

1937.
Who says wood boats don't last?
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Old 11-27-2015, 12:22 PM   #38
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IMO if you don't know the terms scarfing, refastening, sistering, rib, caulking iron, and many others and how to do them or have an open wallet wood is not for you.

I'm having recurring nightmares just recalling these words!

By far the wood working is the most labor, knowledge and experience dependent aspect of yacht repair. To a lesser degree the actual wood used for repairs is problematic just to find straight grain, unchecked, non kiln dried lumber to use for repairs. The average boat owner is blissfully unaware of these details. And a person who is contemplating buying an 'old woody' will get a $eriou$ wake up call when hull planks, ribs or deadwood needs replacing.

Personally, I use the figure of $1,000 a foot for average end of life value of a boat. If the boat is going for LESS than 1,000 a ft then there are deficiencies that need repair. If the boat is over 1,000 a ft then it has had some of the deficiencies addressed.

What gets tricky is when the defects are hidden. Finding a boat that has been 'brought up to maintenance for its age' effects the price. But getting an owner to objectively realize where their vessel is on the scale is the trick. Owners usually think their boat is gold. The OP seems to want a boat for pennies with no realization of 'why' the boat is priced so low.
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Old 11-27-2015, 01:58 PM   #39
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IMO if you don't know the terms scarfing, refastening, sistering, rib, caulking iron, and many others and how to do them or have an open wallet wood is not for you.
Actually, a caulking iron is called a 'Making Iron' by the pros...

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Old 11-27-2015, 02:26 PM   #40
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My shipwright sold his GB woodie and broke even with his costs but not his time. He considers himself lucky. My SW works on many of the local wooden commercial boats. I'd consider him a local expert. The advice here about getting a good surveyor is important but I'd add a good Shipwright to be involved with the survey inspection. A SW will give you a professional opinion on what is involved in the repairs and there WILL BE repairs. My SW says there is always THE WORST plank that needs attention on a wood boat.
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