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Old 12-06-2015, 02:33 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by klee wyck View Post
The Dutch yacht builders sure seem to make rounded surfaces in steel and perhaps even with compound curves. I could not find a good picture of Klee Wycks bow but like FlorenceA she seems to have steel that curves horizontally in toward the fine entry and also vertically out from water line up. I think some of this is done by laying up strips of steel almost like planking but then faring to an art form.
Many of these boats built there under 100 feet and a search of steel hulls under 60 feet for sale will turn up many pages. It has been interesting to me to see so few steel pleasure boats here in the PNW and so many there with climate and cruising grounds not that different.
There is currently a Ukrainian built 50 foot steel hull for sale that I think is stunningly beautiful. I wish I could get her out of my head.
You can't tell really from photos but Boatshed London has a 1962 42' Dutch steel trawler with twin Perkins that on the surface looks very nice and they have apparently cut the price and even have put it now up for auction. Bid starts at $45,000 but they seem willing to take offers too. In Europe they sell easier than in the US but still now well.

Far more steel commercial boats than recreational. Yet, some of the recreational ones are very nice.

Perhaps it's short sighted, but I really don't let resell enter into my boat purchasing decision much. I think one thing is that everyone swears their first, second, third, fourth, fifth are all their last. But I look at the entire price and will I get pleasure equal to what it costs me. Then when I do sell it, that's when I'll worry about the price. Part of it is I am not smart enough to predict the used boat market. It does strange things. For example, with Nordhavn. 43's could bring a premium as there are just no late models. With nearly all boats a 2009 and newer in good shape brings a good price and sells quickly, because sales of new were down so for those years. But then, back to Nordhavn. The exchange rate has just dramatically reduced their prices in US $. So suddenly, the price of a new one isn't nearly as much more than say a 2012 used. For the first time since 2008, they're seeing a swing back to more new boat sales as a percentage of their total. Meanwhile Nordhavn only shows 3 boats newer than 2010 for sale. But a couple of those did pay considerably more for their boats than you'd pay today to buy one.

Just too many factors and when one looks favorable, another hits you negatively.
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Old 12-06-2015, 03:36 PM   #42
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B,
(you stated) You can't tell really from photos but Boatshed London has a 1962 42' Dutch steel trawler with twin Perkins that on the surface looks very nice and they have apparently cut the price and even have put it now up for auction. Bid starts at $45,000 but they seem willing to take offers too. In Europe they sell easier than in the US but still now well.


I am not sure I get your point here. What would be unusual about a 54 year old 42' boat selling (or not selling) for 45K? Would that boat sell better or for a higher price if it were frp or wood? A quick search suggests probably not?

I agree that resale value seems like it should perhaps not be the prime criteria when buying a boat but the reality is that the vast majority of us (certainly to include myself) are dreamers in terms of what we will do with a boat and how long we will do it. It would be fun to see what percentage of boats purchased are back up for sale within 5 years. My instinct would be more than half at least.
I am currently shopping for a boat to add to the fleet and would rather have a steel boat. As it happens, I only expect to own this boat I am shopping for for a few years while I work on a project some distance from Klee Wyck. I will likely buy an frp boat that I boarded this past weekend because it will sell better when I no longer need it in a few years. The boat I looked at was one of the most revered 42s in America. It struck me as I crawled around it how much less boat it felt like to me than the one I currently drive. I concluded that that feeling could just be my bias in that I could just never feel the same about an frp sandwich and interior workmanship typical of the region it was built in as I do about my current steel hull and interior workmanship. The North American market in general disagrees and for this particular purchase, I ignore that at my own peril. The great news is that it is still a great boat and I would surely love cruising it. If I expected to own it 'til death do us part, I would not be making an offer.
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Old 12-06-2015, 05:06 PM   #43
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B,
(you stated) You can't tell really from photos but Boatshed London has a 1962 42' Dutch steel trawler with twin Perkins that on the surface looks very nice and they have apparently cut the price and even have put it now up for auction. Bid starts at $45,000 but they seem willing to take offers too. In Europe they sell easier than in the US but still now well.


I am not sure I get your point here. What would be unusual about a 54 year old 42' boat selling (or not selling) for 45K? Would that boat sell better or for a higher price if it were frp or wood? A quick search suggests probably not?

I agree that resale value seems like it should perhaps not be the prime criteria when buying a boat but the reality is that the vast majority of us (certainly to include myself) are dreamers in terms of what we will do with a boat and how long we will do it. It would be fun to see what percentage of boats purchased are back up for sale within 5 years. My instinct would be more than half at least.
I am currently shopping for a boat to add to the fleet and would rather have a steel boat. As it happens, I only expect to own this boat I am shopping for for a few years while I work on a project some distance from Klee Wyck. I will likely buy an frp boat that I boarded this past weekend because it will sell better when I no longer need it in a few years. The boat I looked at was one of the most revered 42s in America. It struck me as I crawled around it how much less boat it felt like to me than the one I currently drive.
The only point was they have struggled mightily to sell that boat. Perhaps not in the condition it appears. It's been sitting on land, on the market I believe, for two years.

I think all the statistics would be interesting including the 5 years you mention. I don't think half make it back to the market in 5 years but I think a tremendous percentage by 10. My guess would that half would be maybe 7 or 8 years or so. Now there are a good many put on the market almost immediately.

And, yes, I do believe the boat would sell better if it was glass. I think if it was wood though, it would have a far more difficult time selling. Most people are casual boaters, buying just to enjoy. Most don't do their own work on one. Also most don't really understand steel.

I think there are some great lines of steel boats.

As to getting struck by how much less boat one is, I've had that too. There are a lot of boats really designed for space and utility. Most steel boats are as they're not trying to cut weight or narrow the boat for speed and they're not trying to make it sleek and like a sportscar. Boat lengths are so misleading if one thinks they reflect size. We have a 63' Riva. 90% of the boats owned by people on this forum have more space than it. Space is the reason we wouldn't use it for a loop boat. But it's great if we want to get to Bimini in an hour and a half.

Personally, if I was looking for a "trawler" of the type many here have, and there were good choices in steel, I'd go for it. I think Bering has some nice offerings. Now, I'm not real sure about the company. The fact their headquarters and corporate office is in the owner's home in Raleigh, NC, I wonder a bit about. As I've mentioned before I think Coastal Craft makes a great aluminum boat.

Every boat is a compromise. Still, the average boat buyer is not going to consider steel. That's not what they're use to or like.
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