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Old 02-15-2015, 09:47 AM   #61
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"Do you spend July, August and September in FL? Methinks not."

God Forbid!!! WHO would want to?

When cruising I did spend a summer in the Carib , traveling the Windward Island.

With a suitable deck awning the vessel temperature is very close to the actual water temperature , not a big deal .

Behind the higher islands a hatch scoop is a help as the trades are much diminished, and the boat will frequently be on two anchors to be able to point into the swell, not the breeze.

No big deal for retirement cruising.

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Old 02-15-2015, 10:43 AM   #62
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Another data point:

We spent the last ten summers (2.5-3.5 months) cruising BC and/or SE Alaska, traveling 2000-3000 nm each. There are usually 2 or 3 of us on board. We eat almost always on board, and don't go much more than 6 knots most of the time. We anchor ~75% of the time, but would note that costs per foot in SE Alaska harbors are really low. I do almost all boat maintenance myself.

I've kept pretty detailed records. Total cruising costs ranged from $60 to $90 per day on the water, depending on fuel prices and the need for boat parts. Even less if we don't count groceries and alcohol, which we'd want on land too.

Except for marina costs, assuming you have a 32-35ish trawler that's in good shape, I'd expect your cruising costs would not need to be much greater than ours. Our bud's 32 Nordic Tug cruises 6-7 knots with essentially the same fuel economy (4 nmpg) as our 26-footer.
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Old 02-15-2015, 10:53 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
"Do you spend July, August and September in FL? Methinks not."

God Forbid!!! WHO would want to?

When cruising I did spend a summer in the Carib , traveling the Windward Island.

With a suitable deck awning the vessel temperature is very close to the actual water temperature , not a big deal .

Behind the higher islands a hatch scoop is a help as the trades are much diminished, and the boat will frequently be on two anchors to be able to point into the swell, not the breeze.

No big deal for retirement cruising.

.
I hear people say that alot. But having spent three summers in the Keys I can tell you that it is very enjoyable. The highest temp ever recorded since that started keeping records was 99. It is usually in the low 90s or high 80s in the summer. Granted if you were inland it would be miserable, but then who would ever want to be inland. Island life is the way to go.
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Old 02-15-2015, 12:15 PM   #64
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Boating styles have changed and population has increased.
When I started there was no electronics or A/C at least on the size boat I had. Anchors were hauled by hand.


Because the population was half what it is today fewer people were using the same marinas. There was never a question of getting a space so prices were lower.


Regulations were much simpler then as well there was no EPA looking at everything marina operators did. There were fewer boats going to basically the same locations with a lot of anchoring. Simple boats cost less and cost less to maintain and run even allowing for inflation.


IMO you can still boat as your grand father did. With jut a few interior lights or even oil lamps. Slow speed, lots of anchoring, ice in the reefer, paper charts etc. Minimalist boaters still exist but we all read about and see all the boating toys and that convinces us we have to have them.
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Old 02-15-2015, 12:55 PM   #65
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but then who would ever want to be inland.

Cruisers between cruises that worry about what happens along the shore when the tide gets 15-20 ft over normal, with a 120K breeze blowing, prefer an inland Hurricane Hole.

Inland FL SUCKS in the summer , but were 1500 miles North!
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Old 02-15-2015, 01:01 PM   #66
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I find when cruising my credit card bill is about half what is while on dirt. Less opportunity to buy stupid crap and less opportunity to eat out.
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Old 02-15-2015, 01:55 PM   #67
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One of the secrets of keeping boating affordable is K.I.S.S.. No I don't follow my own advise.
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Old 02-15-2015, 02:55 PM   #68
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Quote:
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Boating styles have changed and population has increased.
When I started there was no electronics or A/C at least on the size boat I had. Anchors were hauled by hand.


Because the population was half what it is today fewer people were using the same marinas. There was never a question of getting a space so prices were lower.


Regulations were much simpler then as well there was no EPA looking at everything marina operators did. There were fewer boats going to basically the same locations with a lot of anchoring. Simple boats cost less and cost less to maintain and run even allowing for inflation.


IMO you can still boat as your grand father did. With jut a few interior lights or even oil lamps. Slow speed, lots of anchoring, ice in the reefer, paper charts etc. Minimalist boaters still exist but we all read about and see all the boating toys and that convinces us we have to have them.

Well said.



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Old 02-16-2015, 06:18 AM   #69
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"IMO you can still boat as your grand father did. With jut a few interior lights or even oil lamps"

LED may have a sucky color , but there better than oil lamps for reading. For setting a "mood" oil is still superior>

"Slow speed, lots of anchoring"

defines most inshore or even distance motoring, high speed requires too many stops at the fuel hose.i

"Ice in the reefer, . "

Not cheap, but a modern $400 ice box can hold block ice , for over a week if desired. No instaliation hassles , no dead batts ?

"paper charts etc"

A chart kit and $150 hand held GPS will do for most cruises.

"we all read about and see all the boating toys and that convinces us we have to have them.."

Self control is part of boating.

When you see a must have toy , write it down on a piece of paper and stick it in the log book.

If it still looks like a great idea in a month , have fun!
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Old 02-16-2015, 09:43 AM   #70
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Self control is part of boating.

When you see a must have toy , write it down on a piece of paper and stick it in the log book.

If it still looks like a great idea in a month , have fun!
Good point. Particularly with electronics. If you procrastinate long enough it will be obsolete by the time you go to purchase, and the replacement will be too expensive to purchase, so you wait a bit longer...

This cycle is responsible for me using laptop navigation for nearly ten years and never purchasing a standalone MFD.
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Old 02-16-2015, 10:18 AM   #71
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To Be Co$t Effective:

1. Buy good older boat - Tollycraft, GrandBanks, Hatteras... or the like

2. Anchor out or stay tied at your own dock - preferably in fresh water

3. Don't try to outfit boat with new crap - it's unneeded; stay with the basics

4. Cruise slow when cruising for best mileage... or simply don't cruise much

5. Do you own maintenance aboard and haul-out only when needed

#1 = $20K to $60K for older good condition 34' to 45' FRP boat
#2 = Nearly $0.00 if done correctly
#3 = Very few $$$ if done correctly
#4 = Couple hundred to couple thousand to few/several thousand dollars annually; depending on how much you want to cruise
#5 = Cost of parts and materials if you are good mechanic and don't mind working a bit

Soooo... If you purchased a really good condition, great model, older fiberglass boat (late 1960's thru latter 1990's) at the right price there will be little to no depreciation... cause their re-sale value will already have hit bottom $$$ wi$e. When ready to sell most if not all your investment should come back. Maybe even little bit of profit if you kept her in good condition and make her sparkle for the sale!

If done correctly - #'s 2 - 5 could cost as little as a couple thousand annually... or as many thousand as you feel like spending.

Cost of boating is very inexpensive if you want it to be. Also, boating can be very expensive if you'd like it that way. Anywhere in-between those two extremes is wide open to have happen too!

Best Luck!

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Old 02-16-2015, 11:53 AM   #72
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One thing is simply lifestyle. If you spend money in your land life, you're likely to while boating. Do you go to the concert in the park or the $200 per person one in the coliseum. On boating, do you eat out at 5 star restaurants or is your occasional meal eating out an early bird special or some other special. Many find those and have enough leftovers for a couple more meals.

Now I don't profess we live or boat cheaply. But I've read and observed enough who do. The only thing we do cheaply while boating is oddly enough buying art and artifacts. We've discovered the retail market is quite strong in Florida for art and artifacts from around the country and other countries so we keep one item and sell the others at a nice profit. Don't get me wrong, in no way touches our boating costs but is ironic to be certain.

But that does also bring up something some "retired" boaters are doing. They are finding non-intrusive and enjoyable ways to add just enough income to allow them the occasional splurge on something special. Whether it's ebay or some other web activity or odd jobs along the way. Some even help out at marinas they visit during some peak times. Free dock, work 25 hours a week for a couple of months at a minimum stress job. Just increased the kitty by $1500. I know one man who needed a bottom job. Well, he helped on one the yard was doing, learned how from them, and got free haul-out and land usage to do his own. Even use of their equipment. He was then so good they asked him to assist on another.

It's not ideal and you try to plan and budget well. But when something extra comes up you didn't plan on, you can often find a way to handle it without giving up on the whole idea of boating. There is one marina in Marathon that I believe 2/3 of their workers are those who decided to winter there and ended up working part time while doing so.
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Old 02-16-2015, 08:30 PM   #73
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Another data point:

We spent the last ten summers (2.5-3.5 months) cruising BC and/or SE Alaska, traveling 2000-3000 nm each. There are usually 2 or 3 of us on board. We eat almost always on board, and don't go much more than 6 knots most of the time. We anchor ~75% of the time, but would note that costs per foot in SE Alaska harbors are really low. I do almost all boat maintenance myself.

I've kept pretty detailed records. Total cruising costs ranged from $60 to $90 per day on the water, depending on fuel prices and the need for boat parts. Even less if we don't count groceries and alcohol, which we'd want on land too.
.
You mentioned total cruising costs at $60 to $90 per day - is that per person, or total for the boat and all people on it (food for all people)?

If thats total (and you mentioned there are usually 2 or 3 people on board most of the time - its actually $30 to $45 per person per day. Interesting.

Thanks for sharing.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:42 AM   #74
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$60-$90 per day is the total for boat and people.

We did spend a pretty good bundle having the boat built 17 years ago, and we also spend a fair amount towing from home in Utah up to Prince Rupert to launch, but the cost of operating and maintaining the boat, feeding the crew, etc seems like quite the bargain.
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Old 02-18-2015, 02:28 AM   #75
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Quote:
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"IMO you can still boat as your grand father did. With jut a few interior lights or even oil lamps"

LED may have a sucky color , but there better than oil lamps for reading. For setting a "mood" oil is still superior>

Oh I already planned on oil lamps. I grew up with those in the cabin instead of using the 12 volt system and prefer the mood oil creates
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Old 02-18-2015, 03:04 AM   #76
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I live in Alaska oil lamps are great they produce heat.. was on a boat once down south it had a few oil lamps I had to sleep on the deck.


Don't be afraid of an older boat.. As long as the motor is good and the hull is sound with a good deck and ground tackle. You can add what you need as you go. You would be surprised at what you really need. If you add and rebuild things as you go at least you will know how to fix it.


$hit breaks.


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Old 02-18-2015, 06:41 AM   #77
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Spending, Spending, Spending, is not the key to a great life aboard.

How much is spent is just another choice.

COMFORT is key , and to my simple mind it requires a real couch or real chairs as a slab of whatever on a slab of wood might be OK for a dinette, but NOT for a rainy day aboard.
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Old 02-18-2015, 09:27 AM   #78
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Mick


You will be amazed at the creature comforts available in numerous hull and superstructure designs from the 70's, 80's, 90's in pleasure boats that range from 32' to 60'. Most are quite seaworthy too. In general, the used boat market is glutted with classics. Trick is to find one at correct price that has been VERY Well taken care of. There are some out there; by searching they can be located. But, be careful... cause, just because a detail crew was paid a grand or three for pretty-up does not make it a good boat. Survey, Survey, Survey before purchasing.


Then Play Baby - - > PLAY!
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:00 AM   #79
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Mick I'll sell you a good Willard for less than $60K and there's great cruising opportunities here .... or on you're way home. One GPH.

First time I've clicked on this thread. My mistake.

Yup I use minimal electronics, no gen, small capstan to anchor, FD hull w small engine, no TV, no good dinghy, no FB, no fridge, ect ect. The only one I'm a little frustrated not having is a good dinghy. I use $100 a gal anti-fowling, and usually sleeping bags. I have a King bed at home w a $2000 mattress. But don't miss it on the boat.

I've always thought one of the best things about boating is that you could buy an old rowboat for $30 or a yacht for 3 million. Everything in between is called messing around in boats. Go for it. Trust us ... it's there.
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Old 02-23-2015, 01:45 PM   #80
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So what I am getting from this thread is that it might be more economical to buy used and pump some money into repairing it. I have a friend that has just finished designing a 34' trawler that he says he can sell for around $114,000. My understanding is that this would be ready to cruise at this price, so I am thinking I might be able to play at that price! Is there anything I am missing? The boat is the SeaPiper 34, you can google it. (I can't post a link here)
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