Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-20-2018, 02:59 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
Swift Trawler Winterization list

This is the first winter I will have my ST44 in the North. Below is a list of items that I thought of. Feel free to add/comment. Also, have some questions at the end.

Engines:
- Add fuel stabilizer to tanks, decide whether filling up or leaving empty, take on quick ride to mix, run through system
- Change oil/filters if due
- Change transmission fluid/filter if due
- Drain water from racors
- Drain engine mounted fuel filters
- Close thruhull, remove hose, place into bucket of water to flush, then switch to -50 or -100 engine antifreeze, run through, re-attach hose to thru-hull (keep closed)

Generator:
- Run generator after adding fuel stabilizer
- Change oil/filters if due
- Change coolant if due
- Drain water from racor
- Is there a way to drain the generator fuel filter? Is it a water separator?
- Close thruhull, remove hose, place into bucket of water to flush, then switch to -50 or -100 engine antifreeze, run through, re-attach hose to thru-hull (keep closed)

Freshwater system:
- Drain freshwater tanks (use sump that fits into the access holes to drain, if necessary)
- Drain hot water heater
- Install bypass on hot water heater heat exchange loop (this is in case you will run engines after water system is winterized because if you drain the hot water heater, it will either be empty or if you put antifreeze in it may damage the antifreeze?)
- Is the heat exchange loop coming from the engine to the hot water heater raw saltwater or is it coolant from the engine or coolant from somewhere else?
- Install bypass on hot water heater freshwater loop
- Add water system safe pink alcohol free antifreeze into both tanks (probably 5-10 gallons per tank??)
- Open all fixtures, run until pink flows out of both hot and cold (head sinks, head showers, transom shower, flybridge sink, kitchen sink)
- Pour antifreeze into drains (although probably not necessary unless you were draining the shower wands into the sinks instead of the shower drain)
- How does one winterize the city water connection that leads to the overall water system? Blow it out with an air attachment first?

HVAC:
- Close thruhull, jump pumps, place hose into bucket of fresh water, run to flush
- Switch to antifreeze, run through HVAC pumps/system
- Use turkey baster or similar to add antifreeze into HVAC pans, ensure it makes it through the minisumps and into the HVAC drain manifold

Waste:
- Ensure waste tank is not full
- Pour antifreeze into toilets, flush
- Does anything need to be done to the overboard waste discharge other than ensuring the thruhull is closed?

Misc (systems):
- Drain/winterize saltwater washdown thru-hull
- Winterize saltwater washdown pump/deck port
- Ensure windshield washer fluid is rated for freezing temps
- Shutdown, defrost, clean, dry out all fridges
- Winterize /store dinghy outboard

Misc:
- Consider one last wash / detailing of topsides and hull
- Plug / tape over deck drains on flybridge, deck, etc (maybe pour some antifreeze into them before taping)
- Check anodes, make sure sufficient for winter, if leaving shore power plugged in, ensure that galvanic isolator is functional
- Remove any cleaning fluids, toiletries, cooking items, etc that may freeze
- Open all cabinet doors, drawers, etc
- Hang damprid bags throughout bathrooms, staterooms, salon, etc
- Dry all exterior cushions, consider removing from boat
- Remove exterior wood tables (i.e. flybridge), store in cabin
- Remove grill pan, dispose
- Double up lines and fenders if leaving in water
- Remove all canvas, store
- Ensure propane tank is in off position and disconnected
- Install winter covers or shrink wrap
- Consider an engine room safe heater to keep temps above freezing (might need one in both engine room and genset compartment)
- Check on the boat regularly if stored afloat
- Trickle charge batteries over winter

Questions:
- Is the heat exchange loop coming from the engine to the hot water heater raw saltwater or is it coolant from the engine or coolant from somewhere else?
- Does anything need to be done to the overboard waste discharge other than ensuring the thruhull is closed?
- How does one winterize the city water connection that leads to the overall water system? Blow it out with an air attachment first?
- Should antifreeze be run through bilge pumps?
- Is it worth adding a hanging zinc? What should it bond/clip onto?
- Can the exhaust port be safely left open?
- Does anything special need to be done to thruhulls/seacocks other than closing them?
- What about the shaft thruhull, how to winterize?
- Any issue foreseen with leaving mast upright if shrink wrap can be installed around it? Or is it better to lower it, maybe rest it on a 2x4, and have it shrink wrapped over entirely? I guess I would be concerned with the weight of the 2x4 pressing on the deck?

Anything I am forgetting? Anything that should be done differently?

Thanks!
__________________
Advertisement

mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 03:56 PM   #2
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23- outboard
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 3,865
Comments and advice in bold below:


Quote:
Originally Posted by mystery View Post
This is the first winter I will have my ST44 in the North. Below is a list of items that I thought of. Feel free to add/comment. Also, have some questions at the end.

Engines:
- Add fuel stabilizer to tanks, decide whether filling up or leaving empty, take on quick ride to mix, run through system
- Change oil/filters if due
- Change transmission fluid/filter if due
- Drain water from racors
- Drain engine mounted fuel filters
- Close thruhull, remove hose, place into bucket of water to flush, then switch to -50 or -100 engine antifreeze, run through, re-attach hose to thru-hull (keep closed) You can usually just open the strainer lid, start the engine and pour antifreeze into strainer. Takes 3-4 gallons to get pink froth out of the exhaust.

Generator:
- Run generator after adding fuel stabilizer
- Change oil/filters if due
- Change coolant if due
- Drain water from racor
- Is there a way to drain the generator fuel filter? Is it a water separator?

These usually are the small integral filter and separator sump type. Just replace and you will be fine.

- Close thruhull, remove hose, place into bucket of water to flush, then switch to -50 or -100 engine antifreeze, run through, re-attach hose to thru-hull (keep closed) Same as propulsion engine, but only 1-2 gallons.

Freshwater system:
- Drain freshwater tanks (use sump that fits into the access holes to drain, if necessary)
- Drain hot water heater
- Install bypass on hot water heater heat exchange loop (this is in case you will run engines after water system is winterized because if you drain the hot water heater, it will either be empty or if you put antifreeze in it may damage the antifreeze?) Not necessary. It is coolant so no problem running the engine, but why would you?
- Is the heat exchange loop coming from the engine to the hot water heater raw saltwater or is it coolant from the engine or coolant from somewhere else? See above.
- Install bypass on hot water heater freshwater loop Open drain on hot water heater and drain empty.
- Add water system safe pink alcohol free antifreeze into both tanks (probably 5-10 gallons per tank??) This takes a lot of antifreeze as there could be 5+ gallons of fresh water in each tank and you will have to add a bunch of antifreeze. I disconnect the suction hose to the pump after dumping the fresh water tanks. Then I put the hose in a bucket, fill with antifreeze and then flush as below.
- Open all fixtures, run until pink flows out of both hot and cold (head sinks, head showers, transom shower, flybridge sink, kitchen sink)
- Pour antifreeze into drains (although probably not necessary unless you were draining the shower wands into the sinks instead of the shower drain)
- How does one winterize the city water connection that leads to the overall water system? Blow it out with an air attachment first? The city water connection is on the pressurized side of the pump so backflow with antifreeze while flushing the fixtures.

HVAC:
- Close thruhull, jump pumps, place hose into bucket of fresh water, run to flush I just disconnect hose to the strainer, elevate it and put a funnel in and then start the A/C and pour antifreeze in and displace sea water. Takes a gallon at most.
- Switch to antifreeze, run through HVAC pumps/system
- Use turkey baster or similar to add antifreeze into HVAC pans, ensure it makes it through the minisumps and into the HVAC drain manifold
Condensate and showers drain to sump. Pour enough antifreeze in shower drain to trigger the sump's bilge pump and then a little more to make sure the sump is 50/50.


Waste:
- Ensure waste tank is not full
- Pour antifreeze into toilets, flush
- Does anything need to be done to the overboard waste discharge other than ensuring the thruhull is closed? I disconnect the macerator pump's suction hose, put a funnel in and pour about a half gallon through while running the pump.

Misc (systems):
- Drain/winterize saltwater washdown thru-hull
- Winterize saltwater washdown pump/deck port
- Ensure windshield washer fluid is rated for freezing temps
- Shutdown, defrost, clean, dry out all fridges
- Winterize /store dinghy outboard

Misc:
- Consider one last wash / detailing of topsides and hull
- Plug / tape over deck drains on flybridge, deck, etc (maybe pour some antifreeze into them before taping)
- Check anodes, make sure sufficient for winter, if leaving shore power plugged in, ensure that galvanic isolator is functional
- Remove any cleaning fluids, toiletries, cooking items, etc that may freeze
- Open all cabinet doors, drawers, etc
- Hang damprid bags throughout bathrooms, staterooms, salon, etc
- Dry all exterior cushions, consider removing from boat
- Remove exterior wood tables (i.e. flybridge), store in cabin
- Remove grill pan, dispose
- Double up lines and fenders if leaving in water
- Remove all canvas, store
- Ensure propane tank is in off position and disconnected
- Install winter covers or shrink wrap
- Consider an engine room safe heater to keep temps above freezing (might need one in both engine room and genset compartment)
- Check on the boat regularly if stored afloat
- Trickle charge batteries over winter

Questions:
- Is the heat exchange loop coming from the engine to the hot water heater raw saltwater or is it coolant from the engine or coolant from somewhere else?
- Does anything need to be done to the overboard waste discharge other than ensuring the thruhull is closed?
- How does one winterize the city water connection that leads to the overall water system? Blow it out with an air attachment first?
- Should antifreeze be run through bilge pumps? I put a gallon or two of antifreeze in the main bilge.
- Is it worth adding a hanging zinc? What should it bond/clip onto? I have used the zinc fish and I clamp the wire to the bonding wire at the rudder shaft or any convenient bonding location.
- Can the exhaust port be safely left open? I have left it open, but better to stuff a rag in.
- Does anything special need to be done to thruhulls/seacocks other than closing them? For larger thruhulls open the small drain valve to drain the ball cavity. For smaller thruhulls that don't have these, I blow them out by mouth and while blowing close them to leave the cavity empty. This probably isn't necessary as long as the water the boat sits in doesn't freeze, but????. If on the hard then leave open.
- What about the shaft thruhull, how to winterize?
- Any issue foreseen with leaving mast upright if shrink wrap can be installed around it? Or is it better to lower it, maybe rest it on a 2x4, and have it shrink wrapped over entirely? I guess I would be concerned with the weight of the 2x4 pressing on the deck? Talk to your shrink wrap guy.

Anything I am forgetting? Anything that should be done differently?

Thanks!

David
__________________

djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 07:30 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Comments and advice in bold below:





David
Thank you very much for the advice!

Regarding the engine/genset winterization, if I just pour into the strainer then what happens with the seawater between the thru-hull / seacock and the strainer? I think that can freeze and cause damage?

Regarding the hot water heater exchange loop, its coolant from the engine resevoir or where does it originate? I am worried that if I continue to run the engines, there is hot coolant circulating in the loop but the hot water heater is empty and thus nothing to heat (or in the case of filling it with antifreeze, its heating antifreeze which may hurt the antifreezing abilities). I just don't want to damage my hot water heater.

Regarding adding antifreeze into the water tanks, what happens to the hose between the tanks and the pump? Water left in that section can freeze?

Regarding the city water connection, how can it back flow if it has nowhere to exit? I think the city water connection is a one-way valve? Unless I can somehow figure out how to open it so antifreeze shoots out of the connection...

Thank you for the great idea on blowing out the shaft line and closing while blowing. I will have to look at my larger thruhulls and see if I can drain the ball cavity. I would simple close, unscrew, drain, and leave closed?

Thanks so much!!
mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2018, 08:28 PM   #4
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23- outboard
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 3,865
More in bold:
Quote:
Originally Posted by mystery View Post
Thank you very much for the advice!


Regarding the engine/genset winterization, if I just pour into the strainer then what happens with the seawater between the thru-hull / seacock and the strainer? I think that can freeze and cause damage?

If you drain the ball valve cavity after winterizing, water is only left in the hose. But since all of the mechanical parts either have antifreeze in them or are dry, any freezing will expand the hose with no damage. The use of antifreeze is to protect mechanical parts- hose and tubing will expand.

Regarding the hot water heater exchange loop, its coolant from the engine resevoir or where does it originate? I am worried that if I continue to run the engines, there is hot coolant circulating in the loop but the hot water heater is empty and thus nothing to heat (or in the case of filling it with antifreeze, its heating antifreeze which may hurt the antifreezing abilities). I just don't want to damage my hot water heater.


The engine's coolant system is a closed loop from the block to the main heat exchanger and back with a branch that goes to the water heater's internal coil and then back. You do not need to touch any part of that coolant system. It never sees salt water (directly) and can't freeze as long as you have the proper antifreeze pct.

As you run the engines to suck in antifreeze, the coolant loop will not be affected. It only takes a minute or two to suck in 3-5 gallons of antifreeze through the r/w strainer at idle. During that short time your engine won't overheat. The hot water heater if empty of potable water won't be affected in the least by coolant solution from the engine circulating through it.

Regarding adding antifreeze into the water tanks, what happens to the hose between the tanks and the pump? Water left in that section can freeze?


But it is only tubing and tubing will expand with water freezing inside it with no damage.


Regarding the city water connection, how can it back flow if it has nowhere to exit? I think the city water connection is a one-way valve? Unless I can somehow figure out how to open it so antifreeze shoots out of the connection...


Frankly, I was winging it when I answered the original question as I have never worried about that connection. But if you want to be sure, disconnect the check valve and flush antifreeze back through that hose. To be tripple sure, blow some antifreeze from the city water connection forward through the check valve. Or just blow it out with air-by mouth.


Thank you for the great idea on blowing out the shaft line shaft line? and closing while blowing. I will have to look at my larger thruhulls and see if I can drain the ball cavity. Most big 1-1/2+" valves have the drain. The 3/4-1" valves used for head, a/c, macerator don't. I would simple close, unscrew, drain, screw closed and leave closed? Yes.

Thanks so much!!
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2018, 10:16 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
Thank you
mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2018, 10:27 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
One more thing to add to the list is fluid samples...I know many do it already ( I do regularly) but a good idea for anyone's winterization list to take oil samples after running antifreeze and shutting down.

Oil analysis for engines and genset

Optional transmission

I have typically done oil samples every 50 hours and before winterization. I am contemplating also doing after spring commissioning just to make sure all is well after winter layup.

My experience is the oil can probably last 400+ hours but I haven't pushed it that far yet. I put almost 300 hours on the boat this year and that was an all time record as a result of my trip. Normal years I am around 100-150 depending on trips. I would probably change the oil at least every two years any way regardless if low hours and of course sooner if an analysis indicates. I found my oil was practically new at 200 hours Probably can get 400 hours based on the trend.
mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2018, 11:03 AM   #7
Veteran Member
 
City: Reedville, VA
Country: United States
Vessel Model: Beals Island lobster boat
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 38
I have a question for the folks who recommend blowing through the raw water intake hose while operating the seacock to purge the seacock recesses of raw water - I've always wondered if you can generate enough "blow" to actually force air through the through hull or if you'd get a violent stream of water blasting into your mouth. Is this really feasible for an engine in the 100 to 150 hp range?

Thanks!
Bkay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2018, 02:31 PM   #8
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23- outboard
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 3,865
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bkay View Post
I have a question for the folks who recommend blowing through the raw water intake hose while operating the seacock to purge the seacock recesses of raw water - I've always wondered if you can generate enough "blow" to actually force air through the through hull or if you'd get a violent stream of water blasting into your mouth. Is this really feasible for an engine in the 100 to 150 hp range?

Thanks!
Yes, I have done it with 1Ē and smaller thruhull valves. Bigger ones usually have drain ports.

David
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2018, 11:24 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
All,

In procuring the attachments to bypass the water heater I did receive some helpful information from Quick who makes it.

The fittings to connect the cold pressurized to hot is 1/2" BSPP. I just ordered two fittings with barb connection, I plan to screw in, connect clear pvc hose to the barbs, and bypass that way.

Quick said there should be a hose connected at all times to the drain barb into the bilge. Mine is missing so I am going to run a hose if I can. That will make draining the hot water heater a bit easier if I can get the bilge pump to expel those 10 gallons. I am also debating just plumbing it into the shower sump since that is in the same compartment. TBD.

Quick recommended keeping all the hoses and fittings open on the hotwater heater INCLUDING the mixing valves/hose. They even suggested unscrewing the entire valve/connectors from the hot water heater. They said that air needs to be able to flow into and out of the hotwater heater especially if the engines will be used after draining because the heat exchange loop with heat up the air and in the hot water heater and can pressurize it.

Their final recommendation was to indeed add pink antifreeze into the hot water heater. I know many prefer to just bypass. I will have to think about that some more...
mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2018, 11:30 AM   #10
TF Site Team
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Country: US
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 2,022
I used to drain WH into bilge but started to drain in overboard by adding a hose to drain valve and ysing compressed air to blow it out. Works well and I use the compresdor to blow put lines before adding AF so no extra work.
__________________
Don
2008 MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 01:51 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
Regarding the seacock... I have attached a picture... I think its this model: https://www.groco.net/products/valve...d/ibv-750-bspp

It looks like the red circled item is to just stop the handle, the blue is for bonding, and yellow is the drain/grease port?

What exactly do I do to drain / grease? Shut the seacock, unscrew, let any watter dribble out, and then just must some grease in with my finger? I think it was supposed to have a "Zerk" fitting for a grease gun but that was not installed...

Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20181026_140123.jpg
Views:	41
Size:	73.7 KB
ID:	82352  
mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2018, 05:19 PM   #12
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23- outboard
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 3,865
No the blue circle is the drain port. It faces the opening in the ball when the handle is in the closed position. These aren't really used for lubrication with zerk fittings. Most marine ball valves have teflon seats and don't need any lubrication.



David
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2018, 02:28 PM   #13
Veteran Member
 
City: Reedville, VA
Country: United States
Vessel Model: Beals Island lobster boat
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 38
I can't speak to that particular seacock - but based on the drawing you posted you are correct on the bonding and drain fittings.

I have a number of stainless, screw-in zerk fittings. I got a package at the auto parts store. What I do is close the seacock, unscrew the drain and let the water dribble out, screw in the zerk and grease lightly, then unscrew the zerk, screw back in the bronze screw with a small amount of bedding tape then open and close the handle several times to distribute the grease.

If the boat is hauled, I have been known to just open and close the seacock a few times to release any water and make sure it's operating smoothly then simply smear some grease on the closed ball from outside and inside.

At least I hope that's the right way to do it, I've been doing it for 15 years that way.
Bkay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2018, 04:15 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
I am at an impasse as to how to winterize the freshwater tanks and the hose between them and the pump. Seems I cannot get them drained out enough by simply opening fixtures and running dry. I think that I can get a small sump or pump to drain them through an access hole but I do not know how to winterize the connection between the tank and the pump. Even if I drain and dump antifreeze in, it appears that it is going to require a ton of antifreeze to get it pumping through because of the inaccessible capacity. Then it is going to be a total PITA to cleanse the system of antifreeze. Any thoughts? Thank you.
mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2018, 04:23 PM   #15
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23- outboard
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 3,865
Like I said in a previous post, hoses do not need to be winterized because they will flex with the ice freezing. Just disconnect the hose at the suction of your fresh water pump, drain what you can to the bilge, button it up and it will be fine.


If it really, really concerns you, use a shop vac to pull any water out left in a low spot in the hose.



David
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2018, 08:47 AM   #16
Veteran Member
 
City: Reedville, VA
Country: United States
Vessel Model: Beals Island lobster boat
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
If it really, really concerns you, use a shop vac to pull any water out left in a low spot in the hose.
Hmmm...that's a pretty good idea - not sure why I never considered that myself. Thanks!
Bkay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2018, 08:49 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
City: Z
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Like I said in a previous post, hoses do not need to be winterized because they will flex with the ice freezing. Just disconnect the hose at the suction of your fresh water pump, drain what you can to the bilge, button it up and it will be fine.


If it really, really concerns you, use a shop vac to pull any water out left in a low spot in the hose.



David
I am not convinced that the hoses will flex enough. Why does everyone winterize water systems then?

Regarding the shop vac, why would this be able to pull water out when the freshwater pump itself can't?
mystery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2018, 09:55 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 428
“I am not convinced that the hoses will flex enough. Why does everyone winterize water systems then?”

Because your water system Is comprised of pumps, ridged lines, hot water heater, faucets, valves, and flexible hoses. Skip the winterization process and you will understand completely

“Regarding the shop vac, why would this be able to pull water out when the freshwater pump itself can't?”
You stick the shop vac suction hose into the water tank and vacuum out the remaining water. Which is Probably not necessary.
Easting is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2018, 10:34 AM   #19
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23- outboard
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 3,865
Quote:
Originally Posted by mystery View Post
I am not convinced that the hoses will flex enough. Why does everyone winterize water systems then?

Regarding the shop vac, why would this be able to pull water out when the freshwater pump itself can't?
Not to be too much of a SA, but the answers are based on engineering principles and I are one. Also several years of experience winterizing my boat.

So if you donít believe me then dump 10 gallons of pink stuff in your empty water tanks and pump it through.

David
djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2018, 11:06 AM   #20
TF Site Team
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Country: US
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 2,022
Quote:
Originally Posted by mystery View Post
I am at an impasse as to how to winterize the freshwater tanks and the hose between them and the pump. Seems I cannot get them drained out enough by simply opening fixtures and running dry. I think that I can get a small sump or pump to drain them through an access hole but I do not know how to winterize the connection between the tank and the pump. Even if I drain and dump antifreeze in, it appears that it is going to require a ton of antifreeze to get it pumping through because of the inaccessible capacity. Then it is going to be a total PITA to cleanse the system of antifreeze. Any thoughts? Thank you.
I'm not familiar w how the ST FW tanks are plumbed but my MS 34HT has 2 FW tanks w a connection hose between them. I cut the hose in the middle / low spot and installed a T w a short plugged hose.
To ensure both tanks are completelt drained I pull the plug and it drains in the bilge. Bilge pump most of it out and use shop vac for balance.
I installed a 3 way winterizing valve to introduce pink and placed it as close to the tank outlet as possible.
Drain tanks connect short hose & open 3 way valve stick hose in gal pink and run FW pump to pink each fixture.
__________________

__________________
Don
2008 MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012