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Old 01-29-2018, 12:53 AM   #1
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Rust stains at base of railings

On my ST44 I occasionally get rust stains around the base of the railings at the point they meet the fiberglass. This has happened on the upper deck, as well as around the short railings around the cockpit. I'll take a pic next time I'm on the boat, but wondering if this happens to others.

The railing is stainless, so not sure what exactly is rusting. And I'm assuming it's rust.

Thanks,
Mike
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Old 01-29-2018, 12:55 AM   #2
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Yep and I use FSR to take it off. Interested in other comments and different way....
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:02 AM   #3
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Did a bit of Googling.

http://www.boats.com/how-to/clean-yo...teel-railings/

https://www.cruisingworld.com/how/go...se-rust-stains
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:17 AM   #4
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Rust stains at base of railings

Seems like the Star Brite Rust Stain Remover gets good reviews. Love the thought of spray on spray off or just a light scrub. This chemical approach is likely much easier than trying to get it off using a mild polish.

Just ordered some on Amazon. Will let you know how it works.
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:25 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by MichaelB1969 View Post
Seems like the Star Brite Rust Stain Remover gets good reviews. Love the thought of spray on spray off or just a light scrub. This chemical approach is likely much easier than trying to get it off using a mild polish.

Just ordered some on Amazon. Will let you know how it works.


Iíve used this and was surprised at how well it worked. Cheers!
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:47 AM   #6
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It it a reflection(no pun intended) of using 304 rather than 316 s/steel? Or can it happen with 316?
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:56 AM   #7
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Does it appear to be leaking from inside the stanchion or is it surface rust? S/S can get corrosion when there is not enough oxygen. May be water is inside and then leaking out and carrying the rust out of the stanchion base.
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Old 01-29-2018, 02:17 AM   #8
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Does it appear to be leaking from inside the stanchion or is it surface rust? S/S can get corrosion when there is not enough oxygen. May be water is inside and then leaking out and carrying the rust out of the stanchion base.


Hard to say. I'll have to take a closer look next time I'm on the boat. Will let you know!
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Old 01-29-2018, 10:14 AM   #9
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It is very common for stainless to surface rust on boats. I suspect it is 304 not 316 stainless.

It is very easy to clean if you donít let it go too long. Any of the oxalic acid based rust stain removers will work.

The best rust stain removers are hydrofloric acid based. Look for Whink or Erusticator in the laundry aisle in your grocery store. They are marketed to remove rust stains from clothing but they actually work much faster than oxalic acid cleaners on stainless and gel coat. Donít let it sit on glass. Iím told that hydrofloric acid will etch glass.

I just squirt it on the stain and most of the stain just disappears. I rub what ever remains with my finger and then rinse my finger before it starts to sting. Girly men might want to wear gloves. Do keep it out of your eyes.
Rust Stain Remover | Rust Stain | Whink Products Company - America's #1 Specialty Cleaner Company, Eldora, IA
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Old 01-29-2018, 12:08 PM   #10
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Greetings,
Mr. MB. I've had VERY good success with: Spotless Stainless Home
I had some SS turnbuckles that were slightly rusted. Brush on, wait (but keep moist in hotter weather) rinse off with hose. The website states the product leaves a protective coating. It must because after 1.5 years, not a speck of rust. YMMV.

Mr. HC. HF (hydroflouric acid) is nasty, nasty stuff.
http://www.whink.com/cmssites/ws0811...Oct%202016.pdf
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Old 01-29-2018, 12:18 PM   #11
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For stainless that has some serious rust areas, Lena uses Bar Keepers Friend with a tooth brush. It contains some mild abrasives plus oxalic acid.

https://www.barkeepersfriend.com/cle...soft-cleanser/

On normal day to day ss polishing, with minor rust, she uses Colliniteís no. 850 Metal Wax.
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Old 01-29-2018, 12:26 PM   #12
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Hopcar, Google what hydrofluoric acid does to your body - it may not burn your skin but it penetrates your skin and dissolves the calcium. First thing that happens is your nails fall out because the nailbed is gone. Then it starts working on your bones. There is no antidote once it gets inside you, only before, and it is cumulative. I believe they cut off the parts with acid in them. So "girly men" is a stupid thing to say; if I were the King I would ban Hydrofluoric acid everywhere and in everything as I think it is worse than plutonium.
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Old 01-29-2018, 12:33 PM   #13
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RT you beat me to it. Its nasty, nasty stuff and keeping it in your house or boat is stupidly reckless. Live with a little surface rust or damage yourself? Good choice. Fluorosis - look that one up too!

The whink company should be shot and p*ssed on!
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:23 PM   #14
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The cause of thIS rust are small iron particleS which are carried by the wind or rain or snow.. The particles fall down on the stainless steel and will make an connection with the chromium parts in the stainless steel. When your boat is is the vicinity of a dockyard or metal factory you have more chance to develop this kind of rust than when you are on the open sea. In the end this superficial rust can also contaminate your SS so cleaning the object is required. Most of the time it is very easy to clean the SS.
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:50 PM   #15
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Rust stains at base of railings

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Blu View Post
The cause of thIS rust are small iron particleS which are carried by the wind or rain or snow.. The particles fall down on the stainless steel and will make an connection with the chromium parts in the stainless steel. When your boat is is the vicinity of a dockyard or metal factory you have more chance to develop this kind of rust than when you are on the open sea. In the end this superficial rust can also contaminate your SS so cleaning the object is required. Most of the time it is very easy to clean the SS.


Actually, I think you're on to something as this has only happened when my boat has been at the boat yard - which is where it's been for the 3 weeks prior to me posting this.
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:55 PM   #16
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The cause of thIS rust are small iron particleS which are carried by the wind or rain or snow.. The particles fall down on the stainless steel and will make an connection with the chromium parts in the stainless steel. When your boat is is the vicinity of a dockyard or metal factory you have more chance to develop this kind of rust than when you are on the open sea. In the end this superficial rust can also contaminate your SS so cleaning the object is required. Most of the time it is very easy to clean the SS.
It may be iron contamination or organic contamination...

But it is likely the loss of the passivation layer of the stainless steel. Pretty common with lower grades of stainless steel; particularly near surface defects or heat tint and oxide scale from welding.

The worse case scenario would be that the fabricator chose the wrong filler material when making the weld. I.e. 304 or 309 on 316, creating a chromium depleted zone.

The advice you've gotten so far, is pretty accurate. Use an oxalic or citric based cleaner polisher.

If you see tinting of the metal from welding, consider nitric acid.

Do not use hydrochloric acid, as it contains chlorides.

Hydrofluoric acid is indeed dangerous to humans and pretty much every material it touches. (Breaking Bad, early episode, bathtub). Very regulated in industry, because of that.
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Old 01-29-2018, 05:20 PM   #17
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It could be the fasteners.
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Old 01-29-2018, 05:34 PM   #18
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It could be the fasteners.
D'oh. Yes. That is very likely as well.
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Old 01-29-2018, 05:40 PM   #19
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DO NOT....DO NOT EVEN THINK ABOUT USING HF ACID.
OTHER WARNINGS ARE CORRECT AND SHOULD BE HEEDED.
This not a macho thing and it is irresponsible to recommend anyone consider using it

Ocalic acid based cleaners are plenty strong enough to do the job

Sorry Hopcar.... don't remember disagreeing with you in the past...respect your contributions and all you have done for TFrs... Couldn't let this go w/o a response
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Old 01-29-2018, 05:48 PM   #20
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You can als find it also on the polyester where the stanchions are mounted. It is not the stainless steel or the polyester that is rusting but the very small particles of iron. The quality of the SS doesnot have anything to do with it. The particles stick to the SS because there is a difference in voltage between the SS and the iron particles. (Like a magnet although SS is not magnetic itself because of the chromium in the alloy). But the same applies for the polyester next to the stainless steel. In Dutch you have a special name for it : " vliegroest" literally translated in English: flying rust. It is a well known phenonomen in industrialized areas. It is superficial (you can feel some roughness when you touch the SS. You should polish it because otherwise it will "infiltrate"the SS. (How quick that happens depends of the quality of the SS).
When we had a chartercompany for Sailing yachts in the Netherlands nearly all the boats in the marina suffered from it because the air in the Netherlands gets polluted by industries more than 200 miles away. AnD especially in a salty environment near the sea.
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