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Old 08-09-2017, 01:07 PM   #21
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"Joy removes all the broken pieces from the oil cooler and hoses , my fingers are to fat ."




FWIW - I have found that a very small wetvac available at Home depot called the 'stinger' will suck those pieces out of there even where you cannot see them. And that vac costs less than $40 and we also use it for many other suctions chores as well as for blowing up toys and inflatables.
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Old 08-09-2017, 03:56 PM   #22
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I have always kept one spare impeller on the boat. After hearing about the number of spare impellers some of you are keeping I am beginning to wonder...

Having two spares would be fine, but it means the impeller that I am installing would be a couple years older. That is unless I keep a removed impeller as an "emergency spare" to back up the new spare.
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Old 08-09-2017, 05:47 PM   #23
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Our Tolly has a spare "twin" engine aboard. Soooo... Brand new impellers are used when replacing them; always being careful to do that before either engine's impeller has disintegrated to point of overheat.


Don't forget... the impeller can loose quite a few flukes [i.e. resulting in reduced raw water flow] before the engine's thermostat can no longer open wide enough to sufficiently cool the engine's self contained antifreeze coolant in its heat transfer system. The thermostat when new impellers are installed does not open as wide as when impellers are getting worn out and loosing raw water flow efficiency.


When brand new impellers are installed, by watching the flow of water out of exhaust pipe at idle, you can get a darn good visual "take" on just what that water flow is supposed to look like. Phone video is a good way to jog memory if needed.


I check the tailpipe water flow at idle every time I start engines [before either is warm] to make sure the raw water pump and its impeller are pushing ample water through. When I notice the flow at idle has decreased just a bit, that puts me on alert to keep checking engine temp and to soon install new impellers on both engine's cooling system


Raw Cooling Water Impeller Condition Surveillance - 101
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Old 08-09-2017, 05:54 PM   #24
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"The thermostat when new impellers are installed does not open as wide as when impellers are getting worn out and loosing raw water flow efficiency. "

Please educate me. I thought the thermostat open and closed because of tempature not pressure.

Help.
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Old 08-09-2017, 06:38 PM   #25
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Art

"The thermostat when new impellers are installed does not open as wide as when impellers are getting worn out and loosing raw water flow efficiency. "

Please educate me. I thought the thermostat open and closed because of tempature not pressure.

Help.
Pressure from raw water flow has nothing to do with engine antifreeze coolant's internal thermostat actions regarding how much coolant flows through the engine. Raw water flow in a boat should have no restrictions that builds any pressure. If it does build pressure inside itself then something is broken. The raw water portion of the cooling system should freely flow and it is the raw water pump's impeller that creates/sustains that flow.

Temp of the antifreeze coolant mixture going through heat exchanger into the engine is what opens the thermostat to what ever "opened" or "closed" amount is needed to keep the engine cool. Per thermostat's designed temperature level that coincides with what temperature the engine is designed to operate at. Thermostat always keeps an engine at desired temperature - until it can't. There are many reasons why the thermostat may not be able to maintain temperature at proper level. Here we are only addressing the raw water flow in accordance with raw water pump's impeller condition.

Sooo... if the water in heat exchanger is well cooled by the raw water flow coming from raw water pump's good condition impeller the thermostat reacts accordingly [opens or closes] to maintain engine and coolant temp level for which the thermostat is set at for the engine to run at. As the impeller gets worn out and the raw water flow then decreases the thermostat needs to open wider accordingly to maintain the coolant and engine temperature it's designed for. Once the raw water flow becomes so much reduced that even with thermostat wide open the engine and coolant overheats - BIG Problem Occurs! Because if for any reason [including but not limited to not enough raw water flow for any reason] the fully open thermostat cannot maintain correct operating temperature then the temp of coolant and engine will likely continue to rise past point of engine being able to withstand the extra heat level.

Hope this helps.
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Old 08-09-2017, 07:08 PM   #26
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Thanks. That is different than what I thought upyou were saying.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:59 PM   #27
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Thanks. That is different than what I thought upyou were saying.
Well, Big... Sometimes my thinking gets mixed up with my words. Often when that happens I begin thinking about pretty women,,,, and then,,, suddenly... discussion about things like impellers, raw water pumps and heat exchangers go onto the rear burner! = LOL
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Old 08-10-2017, 08:48 AM   #28
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At my age I would rather have a hard boiled egg.
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Old 08-10-2017, 10:39 AM   #29
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FWIW - I have found that a very small wetvac available at Home depot called the 'stinger' will suck those pieces out of there even where you cannot see them. And that vac costs less than $40 and we also use it for many other suctions chores as well as for blowing up toys and inflatables.
Not in a gasoline powered boat, I hope. Diesel would be fine.


I keep my spare impellers in the box they came in. The box is in a plastic (similar to Tupperware) box with other spare parts in the engine compartment.
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Old 08-10-2017, 10:55 AM   #30
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Not in a gasoline powered boat, I hope. Diesel would be fine.


I keep my spare impellers in the box they came in. The box is in a plastic (similar to Tupperware) box with other spare parts in the engine compartment.
Am I not getting a clear picture of circumstances... How would a vac be bad for sucking out broken impeller fluke pieces from cooling system in well ventilated area aboard gasoline powered boat?
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Old 08-10-2017, 12:05 PM   #31
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Not in a gasoline powered boat, I hope. Diesel would be fine.


I keep my spare impellers in the box they came in. The box is in a plastic (similar to Tupperware) box with other spare parts in the engine compartment.
Diesel and gas outboards in my case - I do not remember owning a gas inboard but I am sure I had at one time.
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Old 08-10-2017, 06:36 PM   #32
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Having twins I keep 8 new impellers and 5 foe the generator. Yes I try to use an old one and replace it with a new purchased one. I ven been known to save the best looking of old ones just in case. My nemesis for impellers is plastic bags.

Learn me a little here...8 impellers seems like a lot to me. That of course is 4 per engine. Why so many? How often do you change them?
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Old 08-10-2017, 06:50 PM   #33
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A new impeller every year approx 200 hrs - 250 hrs. The extras are just in case. I travel to the Bahamas and they are hard to find there. One trip I used three replacements. Better to have them and not need them than to not have them.
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Old 08-10-2017, 10:25 PM   #34
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Wow, three failed impellers? That alone would worry me. But given the more remote waters, I can certainly see why you would want extra spares.
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Old 08-10-2017, 10:31 PM   #35
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Wow, three failed impellers? That alone would worry me. But given the more remote waters, I can certainly see why you would want extra spares.
I'd look for another source for my impellers too, go back to OEM if not using it.
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Old 08-11-2017, 12:33 PM   #36
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Dave and BandB

Yes, I always use OEM impellers. If they were big and took a lot of room I might not carry as many but it's cheap insurance. A friend ruined two impellers before he realized his pump housing was bad and destroying impellers with just a few seconds of use.
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:34 PM   #37
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Wow, three failed impellers? That alone would worry me. But given the more remote waters, I can certainly see why you would want extra spares.

Dave: I've replace the impeller on 3 occasions over 5 years and the old ones look fine. I keeps the old ones as spares. I think some of the problems people have on the east coast are less likely here. I think they have some issues with rapid fouling as well as pickup of sand.

Keep a spare impeller, new if you like, or keeps some old ones. Relax! Don't worry! Have a home brew!

Jim
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:41 PM   #38
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You don't want to use a shop vac in the engine room on a gas powered boat due to gas fumes. The shop vac can and do explode. Boat/US has many cases of just that.
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Old 08-12-2017, 06:56 PM   #39
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Most of us here have Diesels not gas engines so spark probably is not a major concern.

Just my SSO.
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Old 08-12-2017, 07:10 PM   #40
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You don't want to use a shop vac in the engine room on a gas powered boat due to gas fumes. The shop vac can and do explode. Boat/US has many cases of just that.
If there are gasoline fumes in enough concentration to explode by a vac turning on while it's in its operator's hands... then... the operator is unfortunately damn dumb to begin with.
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