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Old 12-10-2012, 07:25 AM   #41
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I'd be more interested in inventing a fogging compound for diesels which would not cause them to run away.

Its at NAPA , just use an intermittant spray.
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Old 12-10-2012, 12:32 PM   #42
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I'd be more interested in inventing a fogging compound for diesels which would not cause them to run away.
Its at NAPA , just use an intermittant spray.
Any time I have tried commercial outboard fogging spray like CRC brand, it just causes the diesel to burn it and run on. What should I look for at NAPA?
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Old 12-11-2012, 06:33 AM   #43
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What should I look for at NAPA?

Look at the pushing end of your finger.

Start and stop the spray , let the engine run on it , it will still stay and protect the engine..
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Old 12-11-2012, 07:49 AM   #44
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I'm thinking that "fogging oil" isn't a lot different than diesel fuel. And since it's going to burn, it's not really "fogging".

My engines winter storage instructions are on the boat so I can't quote them and I don't have to winterize the boat so I've never followed them, but I don't think there's any mention of "fogging".
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Old 12-11-2012, 12:00 PM   #45
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Wink

He did not say how he added oil. On classic old cars the oil was added though the valve covers, and even on some newer cars. On the Perkins gen set engine the oil is added through the cover, and you can also on the 671. So if a person added oil though the valve cover then the oil would lube most of the engine as it makes its way down into the oil sump.

However, the another big concern, especially for 2 strokes is protecting the cylinders as one or more is always open. Many of the commercial old salts will bump/turn the engine to move the cylinders, pumps, impellors, bearing to a different location. When puting the 2 stroke OB away for the winter I will spray them down with WD-40 and even in the comparator while cranking. The, 1970, 140 HP merc OB is still running strong. However, I do not bump/turn them over when stored as they are in a heated dry storage area.

My diesel mechanic advised me to use WD 40 to prime/start the diesel engines, and also to bump/turn the engine every month or two. However, they both start so easy so I run them until the oil pressure comes up, 30 seconds every other month.

Then there is the discussion about cold starts vrs. warm starts, how oftern to start and for how long?





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Old 12-11-2012, 12:10 PM   #46
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Good points Phill but I don't think much of the engine gets lubed by pouring oil down/through the valve cover. Only a small part of the valve gear will see any oil. And on some engines the camshaft won't get any.
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Old 12-11-2012, 02:27 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
I'm thinking that "fogging oil" isn't a lot different than diesel fuel. And since it's going to burn, it's not really "fogging".

My engines winter storage instructions are on the boat so I can't quote them and I don't have to winterize the boat so I've never followed them, but I don't think there's any mention of "fogging".
Agree that's what I thought, if it runs the engine (which it does) then it's burning, and not fogging. I thought FF was onto something different.
Question: Synthetic oil burn? Amsoil makes one.
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Old 12-12-2012, 07:12 AM   #48
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Engine lube oil is designed to be scraped off the cylinder in normal operation.

Its rapid drain down is why we should protect engines, synthetic is even worse , it drains quicker...

Weather some of it burns is not the question.

Fogging oil is designed to stick to the surface of the metal.

The fluid will protect the valves , cylinders etc , Esp if the engine is then sealed to constant air flow. Enough is left to do this while some does burn out.

"My engines winter storage instructions are on the boat so I can't quote them and I don't have to winterize the boat "

Most engine mfg have their service instructions on line,

Look for "out of service over 30 days" or simply seasonal storing in their index.
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