Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-31-2012, 02:24 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
MT Nest's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/T Nest
Vessel Model: 1984 Monk 36 #31
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 44
Stern Thruster

Has anyone had any experience with the "Sideshift" stern thruster. Thinking about installing one on a 36' Monk. Single screw with bow thruster. First Mate thinks it will help make her life easier.
__________________
Advertisement

MT Nest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 03:42 PM   #2
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
If you alreadt have a bow thruster..I suggest practice docking. If you need both bow and stern thrusters to dock..I think you need to see a better docking picture which will ultimately make docking safer and easier in the long run. Even if you have to hire someone for lessons.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 04:37 PM   #3
Veteran Member
 
MT Nest's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/T Nest
Vessel Model: 1984 Monk 36 #31
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 44
I don't need it but the second in commad is asking about it. I agree with more practice. Gotta keep em happy.
MT Nest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 04:48 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Delia Rosa's Avatar
 
City: St. Catharines
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Delia Rosa
Vessel Model: C & L Sea Ranger 47 Raised Pilothouse
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Nest View Post
I don't need it but the second in commad is asking about it. I agree with more practice. Gotta keep em happy.
Peace of mind is a wonderful thing.... e.g. I've flown commercially alot and have never needed an oxygen mask, but it is nice to know that it is there if required.

Same thing for thrusters.... skill in using engines and rudder is an important thing, as well as good knowledge of how your boat responds to various circumstances. But in addition to that, tools like thrusters can be a wonderful thing.... we have them and I am glad of it!
__________________
Susan and Dan
"Delia Rosa"
Point Breeze, N.Y.
Delia Rosa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 05:15 PM   #5
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Nest
I don't need it but the second in commad is asking about it. I agree with more practice. Gotta keep em happy.
If it keeps the wife happy and eager to climb on the boat it's money well spent.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 07:13 PM   #6
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,711
Having nothing to do w the wife stern thrusters that are mounted above the bottom of the boat on the back of the transom do'nt have any downside that I know of except the cost and I think for thrusters they are prolly cgheap. Any increased control is a plus. If I had a flat submerged transom I'd do it. Half the time prop walk is a blessing but the other half ...............
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 07:35 PM   #7
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Is anyone going to answer the OP question or are you going to just go right back to the tired old thruster argument? ;-)
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 07:41 PM   #8
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by GonzoF1 View Post
Is anyone going to answer the OP question or are you going to just go right back to the tired old thruster argument? ;-)
I would think the old tired argument is whether to do what the first mate/admiral wants because it is "thought ot be a good idea" or get the real skinny from people with experience...but your right...we should answer the question...

... which I can't because I have no experience with stern thrusters at all despite thousands of hours and hundreds of boats I have delivered...so they must not be too popular no natter what brand.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 08:03 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Delia Rosa's Avatar
 
City: St. Catharines
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Delia Rosa
Vessel Model: C & L Sea Ranger 47 Raised Pilothouse
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
I would think the old tired argument is whether to do what the first mate/admiral wants because it is "thought ot be a good idea" or get the real skinny from people with experience...but your right...we should answer the question...

... which I can't because I have no experience with stern thrusters at all despite thousands of hours and hundreds of boats I have delivered...so they must not be too popular no natter what brand.
Don't know about anyone elses' thousands of hours and hundreds of boats I have delivered
'we can only state that we installed Side Power bow and stern thrusters... and we love them!!
__________________
Susan and Dan
"Delia Rosa"
Point Breeze, N.Y.
Delia Rosa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 09:07 PM   #10
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Nest View Post
Has anyone had any experience with the "Sideshift" stern thruster. Thinking about installing one on a 36' Monk. Single screw with bow thruster. First Mate thinks it will help make her life easier.
As you are in the PNW you may be aware of a second option in stern thrusters from Cap Sante Cap Sante Marine Thrusters | Bow, stern, box thruster sales & service. How these compare to the Side Power or "Sideshift" units I have no idea but the couple of people I've talked to over the years who have the Cap Sante thruster as well as the magazine reviews I've read have been very favorable.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 09:40 PM   #11
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by GonzoF1 View Post
Is anyone going to answer the OP question or are you going to just go right back to the tired old thruster argument? ;-)
I thought I did???
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2012, 10:34 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Adelaide's Avatar
 
City: La Conner, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1983 Tung Hwa Clipper
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Nest View Post
Has anyone had any experience with the "Sideshift" stern thruster. Thinking about installing one on a 36' Monk. Single screw with bow thruster. First Mate thinks it will help make her life easier.

I just installed this thruster and gave some feedback Link.

Yes, I'd buy it again. One word of advice, buy the "L Bracket" instead of mounting it to the swim step or horizontally. It's worth the over priced bracket cost.
Adelaide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 12:42 AM   #13
Guru
 
Carey's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Happy Destiny
Vessel Model: Custom Lobster Yacht
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,101
Quote:
Originally Posted by GonzoF1 View Post
Is anyone going to answer the OP question or are you going to just go right back to the tired old thruster argument? ;-)
I guess if anyone is inclined to answer the question, they will. Chastising those who deviate slightly from your expectations may not prove to be productive.
__________________
Carey Worthen
Master of Disaster
Carey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 08:50 AM   #14
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carey View Post
. Chastising those who deviate slightly from your expectations may not prove to be productive.
Not productive, you are correct, but some folks here thrive on it.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 08:54 AM   #15
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,390
I can't say anything bad about a tool that helps us operate or control our boats more easily or safely. Some folks take pride in doing things the hard way, others take pride in doing things the smart way. That means making use of tools and technology.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 03:27 PM   #16
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
We wouldn't pay money to have a bow or stern thruster (or both) installed on our boat but if it had them we'd use them. The GB36 we chartered was a single with a bow thruster and we had no qualms about using it despite the gravel-in-a-cuisinart sound. Of course we were much newer to this type of boat than we are now, but as Ron says a tool that makes it faster, better, easier, or safer is worth using.

We've been in plenty of situations over the last 14 years with our twin engine boat where, while we have always been able to deal with them using thrust and rudder, it would have been easier if not faster to simply hit a button or move a lever.

The original poster made a point that everyone seems to be overlooking and that is that the addition of a stern thruster to his boat will enable his wife to enjoy her boating experience that much more. And that, boys and girls, is what it's all about.

If one's boating partner is less than enthusiastic about going out on the boat, to my way of thinking that sort of defeats the whole bit about getting a boat.

My wife is more confident and relaxed with two engines under the cabin sole. She knows all the "less cost" reasons for having a single but she prefers a twin. This plus the fact I like running multiple engines means we will never own a single engine boat.

So I see no fault in the OP's desire for a stern thruster even if he himself is confident running a single without one. The fact that other boaters don't like or want one is sort of irrelevant.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 03:58 PM   #17
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
We wouldn't pay money to have a bow or stern thruster (or both) installed on our boat but if it had them we'd use them. The GB36 we chartered was a single with a bow thruster and we had no qualms about using it despite the gravel-in-a-cuisinart sound.

......snip...

himself is confident running a single without one. The fact that other boaters don't like or want one is sort of irrelevant.
I would never say don't have one, don't buy one, don't use one...they make recreational boating more fun for many by making a really frustrating part of boating less stressful...

I do somewhat raise an eyebrow at adding a stern thruster when one already has a bow thruster...again...not really a big deal...but after several decades of teaching hands on boating/docking...I worry that if somene's skill level is that low, (self perceived or by SO) maybe spending the equivalent on training (for both) in the long run may make their boating safer and less stressful.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 04:10 PM   #18
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
There can be some situations-- as have been related in this forum from time to time when the stern thruster topic has come up--- in which the ability to move the stern with a thruster can be beneficial. Without knowing the OP's specific situation it's impossible to judge if a stern thruster would make a challenging task less challenging in his case.

But it's not uncommon for marinas in this area to have adverse currents and winds throw a monkey wrench into the most skilled skipper's intentions. The few boaters I've met who had stern thrusters installed all said, as I recall, they installed them to deal with a very specific situation they regularly encountered, like getting into their own slip.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 04:37 PM   #19
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
There can be some situations-- as have been related in this forum from time to time when the stern thruster topic has come up--- in which the ability to move the stern with a thruster can be beneficial. Without knowing the OP's specific situation it's impossible to judge if a stern thruster would make a challenging task less challenging in his case.

But it's not uncommon for marinas in this area to have adverse currents and winds throw a monkey wrench into the most skilled skipper's intentions. The few boaters I've met who had stern thrusters installed all said, as I recall, they installed them to deal with a very specific situation they regularly encountered, like getting into their own slip.
I hear everyone loud and clear...it's not hard to figure out...especially for someone that teaches docking regularly...often in a place many on here said they wouldn't even call a marina due to the current...

For me it still boils down to improving basic skills...not avoiding them....there are many times I won't take a boat to a particular point in space due to adverse something...but that changes relatively fast with a change in wind, tide, mechanical, etc...so I go there when things change.

But I can honestly say I have NEVER...even when holding barges motionless in tide/current against bridge pilings...I have NEVER needed to move a boat sideways. There is always something easy to do to get the bow or stern over, spring line or not, always something ANY boater should be able to do.

Bow or stern thruster yes...both seems overkill.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2012, 04:40 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
mahal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 436
To me, thrusters are somewhat like our propulsion engines except that it moves a vessel sideways as opposed to forward and backward. I wonder how the "set-in-their-ways" type people felt when engines were first introduced into boating. Did they say that it was a crutch, and that one will not sail or paddle very well when the engine fails? Just wondering.
__________________

mahal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012