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Old 01-07-2013, 11:51 AM   #261
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Anyone can stand their ground....long life experiences don't make you right (as per some TF members who think a lifetime of experience, actual work in that field and an armful of certifications still don't make your opinions worth anything...)....

You can get persnickety about correctness of terms....but whether fishermen, old British guys, brokers, Grand Bank owners,etc...etc....don't want to call a Grand Banks a trawler...that's just fine....

But in the long run most boaters will call a Grand Banks a trawler....and like a shoe or skeg on a boat...who gives a crap in the big scheme of things.......it's not like arguing the port or starboard side of a boat which IS important...
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Old 01-07-2013, 11:54 AM   #262
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Chapman: "Within the commercial fishing community, the word "trawler" has a specific meaning relating to a style of fishing, but in recreational boating the term is used much more loosely. In general, a cruiser that does not have sufficient horsepower to get into a planing mode is known as a TRAWLER. ..."
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:19 PM   #263
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Mark that dictionary of yours is a powerful thing.

Skidgear,
Shocked again! What on earth could you base that opinion on? And what boat do you think most represents a trawler?

By marks dictionatorial definition a 52 foot Chris w a 3hp Johnson clamped to the swim stet would be about as trawler as one could get.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:38 PM   #264
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skeg:
Nautical Dictionary, Glossary and Terms directory: Search Results

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/skeg

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/skeg

shoe:
Nautical Dictionary, Glossary and Terms directory: Search Results

trawler:
http://www.seatalk.info/cgi-bin/naut...=Look+it+up%21

More fuel for the fire, but consider that the above is from the Internet.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:40 PM   #265
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By marks dictionatorial definition a 52 foot Chris w a 3hp Johnson clamped to the swim stet would be about as trawler as one could get.
Or this one ... it is a fantastic "cruiser" and it doesn't have enough power to plane.
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Old 01-07-2013, 01:27 PM   #266
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Maybe that's why Lizzie got rid of the Brittania - didn't want to be hanging around with us trawler-trash.
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:09 PM   #267
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A single engine boat has more room in the engineroom which allowes one to more closely view and monitor the related systems. You are right, one will have more access to and therefore be able to or more willing to do preventive maintance. For me to contorte around a set of twins make me unwilling to work around there. In a single engineroom I am more able to move around therfore more willing.
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:36 PM   #268
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A single engine boat has more room in the engineroom which allowes one to more closely view and monitor the related systems. You are right, one will have more access to and therefore be able to or more willing to do preventive maintance. For me to contorte around a set of twins make me unwilling to work around there. In a single engineroom I am more able to move around therfore more willing.
Folks, the post above should end all single vs. twin debates. The secret answer has been revealed - twin engined boats are less reliable because owners do not or are less likely to monitor their engines. Marin and others with twins, you need to stop driving your boats with pumps that have missing impeller blades, frayed belts, collapsed hoses, clogged heat exchangers and who knows what else.
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:42 PM   #269
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A single engine boat has more room in the engineroom which allowes one to more closely view and monitor the related systems.
I think the issue becomes sorta moot as you increase boat size. And the larger boats would supposedly have twins instead of singles. But if you take a boat that is normally designed for a single and cram twins inside, then yeah, it'll be damn cramped down there.


Doesn't look cramped in there, but that's a 72' ship.

Engine room on the USS Hornet:


Others are very tight indeed:


Maybe shoulda gone with single engine instead of twins.
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Old 01-07-2013, 03:18 PM   #270
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Folks, the post above should end all single vs. twin debates. The secret answer has been revealed - twin engined boats are less reliable because owners do not or are less likely to monitor their engines. Marin and others with twins, you need to stop driving your boats with pumps that have missing impeller blades, frayed belts, collapsed hoses, clogged heat exchangers and who knows what else.
...chuckle...well said
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Old 01-07-2013, 03:32 PM   #271
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Last week I had the shocking experience of listening to a man with life long experience in boating more than equal to most here on TF say that a GB was not a trawler.
Well, since American Marine never referred to their Grand Banks line of boats as "trawlers" he was correct. The current company, Grand Banks, Llc, has taken to using the term "trawler yacht" in their promotional material and website but that's simply an acknowledgment of the marketing hype that gave birth to the notion of a recreational "trawler" in the first place.

If your market insists on calling your product a "trawler," then it would be a foolish manufacturer who continued to call them something else even if that something else was actually correct. If everyone started called shoes "footies" instead of shoes, Nike would soon start calling themselves a "footie company," not a shoe company.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:07 PM   #272
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Skidgear,
Shocked again! What on earth could you base that opinion on? And what boat do you think most represents a trawler?
OK then....I'm shocked that you're shocked that I was shocked!!

The boats represented on this web site are poseurs one and all. Nothing wrong with that mind you.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:26 PM   #273
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A single engine boat has more room in the engineroom which allowes one to more closely view and monitor the related systems. You are right, one will have more access to and therefore be able to or more willing to do preventive maintance.
You mean the last 14 years that I have spent meticulously maintaining the two engines in our boat--- or having them maintained when doing things like replacing engine mounts, exhaust systems and so on exceeded my experience or time available--- religiously changing the injection pump oil, servicing seacocks, checking hoses, replacing impellers and belts, inspecting for oil, coolant, and fuel leaks, cleaning raw water filters, bleeding the exhaust manifold to ensure there is no air pocket at the high point before every cold start-- something I doubt any FL120 operator does, single or twin--- and so on, most of which require getting to both sides of both engines, I've been doing it wrong?

That for the last 14 years we should have been driving our twin-engine boat with no thought whatsoever to the engines, secure in the knowledge that if one engine fails we have the other one?

I promise to mend my ways for the next 14 years.

"A single owner is more wiling to or able to do preventative maintenance than a twin owner." What an absurd assumption.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:39 PM   #274
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You mean the last 14 years that I have spent meticulously maintaining the two engines in our boat--- or having them maintained when doing things like replacing engine mounts, exhaust systems and so on exceeded my experience or time available--- religiously changing the injection pump oil, servicing seacocks, checking hoses, replacing impellers and belts, inspecting for oil, coolant, and fuel leaks, cleaning raw water filters, bleeding the exhaust manifold to ensure there is no air pocket at the high point before every cold start-- something I doubt any FL120 operator does, single or twin--- and so on, most of which require getting to both sides of both engines, I've been doing it wrong?

That for the last 14 years we should have been driving our twin-engine boat with no thought whatsoever to the engines, secure in the knowledge that if one engine fails we have the other one?

I promise to mend my ways for the next 14 years.

"A single owner is more wiling to or able to do preventative maintenance than a twin owner." What an absurd assumption.
you did all that and still had an engine breakdown??......that convinces me, single engine is best. Kinda proves what someone said about it being hard to be thorough with two engines cause of the cramped space
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:47 PM   #275
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We have never had an engine breakdown. We had raw water cooling problems three times--- failed coolant pump seal on the initial delivery trip from Tacoma to Bellingham after the the boat was trucked up from California, and two instances of raw water exterior intake partial blockages (from outside the boat) that prompted precautionary shutdowns, and one time I let an engine get a slug of air during a fuel transfer for a reason that was totally my fault and we didn't want to take the time to bleed the engine because our guests had to get home by a particular time so we simply finished the run on one.
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:01 PM   #276
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To confuse the issue further, our old wooden boat had a "worm shoe". A sacrificial piece of wood running the length of the keel.
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:15 PM   #277
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I really don't see it as adding to the confusion...the guy who first started using the term "shoe" probably meant it to refer to a "protector part" ...not an integral part of the keel.

To me its easy and logical...but that doesn't always make it correct!
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:15 PM   #278
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We have never had an engine breakdown. We had raw water cooling problems three times--- failed coolant pump seal on the initial delivery trip from Tacoma to Bellingham after the the boat was trucked up from California, and two instances of raw water exterior intake partial blockages (from outside the boat) that prompted precautionary shutdowns, and one time I let an engine get a slug of air during a fuel transfer for a reason that was totally my fault and we didn't want to take the time to bleed the engine because our guests had to get home by a particular time so we simply finished the run on one.
humm...so you have had more than one failure with twin engines....So maybe since two is better than one engine that three engines would be even better than one impecably maintained engine? Or maybe that single engine failure is less common cause they never make it back to port for documentation creating the illusion that twins may be more dependable/

three engines...wonder if there are any. Is'nt this like in the early days of aircraft when extra engines were seen to increase dependability? The trend has been to fewer engines and for good reason


In fifty years of boating, none in a trawler, i never had a single engine failures.One duck blind, one loose anchor rode, one gravel bar, caused my engine to stop in fifty years but none because of engine or related systems failure all because of my failure.
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:35 PM   #279
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three engines...wonder if there are any. Is'nt this like in the early days of aircraft when extra engines were seen to increase dependability? The trend has been to fewer engines and for good reason.
Lots of 3 engine boats around.

Early flying machines added engines to provide enough power to get off the ground ... they couldn't make a single engine with enough power so they just kept adding them until the thing would fly and carry a load. Take a look at the Linke-Hoffman R.II for example.

If we had giant turbofans around in the 1950s we probably wouldn't have had so many 4 engine planes. Marin can probably supply some good leads on Boeing's take on that subject.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:58 PM   #280
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Lots of 3 engine boats around.

t.
this isnt exactly what i had in mind
Motor Yacht Pershing 108 - a Pershing Superyacht

all the fishing trawlers and pleasure boats i could find were two engined
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