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Old 04-13-2016, 10:17 AM   #21
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Easy out and brass are not a good mix because the brass is soft and may just tighten in the hole but its worth a go. Seen that the hole is 1/2 inch grind down the end of a hacksaw blade so it fits in the hole then cut down the brass to metal in the block .Repeat this at 90 degrees then try to tap out the remaining brass with a 1/4" chisel . In both cases give a good squirt with pipe freeze it may just shrink the brass enough to help

+1

Can't think of anything worse than brass for this job, except perhaps aluminum
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Old 04-13-2016, 10:30 AM   #22
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Amazon sells the Cobra Pipe Nipple Extractor set. This works well if there is very little space to swing a wrench and is designed for pipe nipple problems. Wish you good luck with your project.
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Old 04-13-2016, 11:01 AM   #23
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You don't want a valve cantilevered out on a pipe nipple from an engine block. Vibes will fatigue the nipple right at the thread roots. Especially brass. Get a hydraulic nipple, steel.
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Old 04-13-2016, 11:40 AM   #24
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How very lucky you are to be able to see, let alone get at the nipple!

Replace the others, too, if they're brass. Steel or stainless steel would be preferable to brass. Even though there is anti-corrosion stuff in the coolant, dissimilar metals are undesirable (though copper, brass, steel and iron coexist in residential hot water heating systems). Steel nipples will fail from fatigue, if the loads and vibrations are high enough.

I had the 1 1/4" exhaust riser nipple break off of the manifold of the Yanmar 3GM30 in our sailboat. Happily, the fitting at the end of the manifold came off with a pair of bolts and a gasket and I was able to take the piece ashore, put it in a vise and saw the requisite grooves to peel the bit out. I'll never tell that I simply reinstalled the broken nipple and it's been trouble-free for the last 10 years/1000 hours.
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Old 04-13-2016, 12:23 PM   #25
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Internal nipple extractor. It is the best for this. Don't ask me how I know.
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Old 04-13-2016, 12:44 PM   #26
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Internal nipple extractor. It is the best for this. Don't ask me how I know.
mmmm ! .... nah ! I won't say it
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Old 04-13-2016, 12:50 PM   #27
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I knew somebody's mind would go there.
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Old 04-13-2016, 12:53 PM   #28
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I knew somebody's mind would go there.
Yours too apparently
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Old 04-13-2016, 04:45 PM   #29
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http://www.amazon.com/Wheeler-Rex-87...7SV0EMDYYXNZMB

I have yet to run into a corroded or broken nipple that wont extract with this tool.

And I am not a big fan of the stainless nipples. Stainless is very hard and brittle. If absolute care is not taken, threads can break off and the nipple will damage the female threads it is seated in. It can also get stuck when threads break off and lodge in the joint. I would rather have softer material on the male fitting (nipple side). My opinion is to just get another brass one. How long did the existing one last?
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Old 04-13-2016, 05:41 PM   #30
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Stainless is very soft and has low sheer personally I hate the stuff its over used and often used as a cheaper way of manufacturing a product because of its makeup .Stainless into anything but stainless is a problem waiting to happen.
When a design engineer is developing a new product a lot of consideration is placed on materials that will be used in the manufacture of a product. Consideration is taken in choosing sacrificial materials that can be used to assist maintenance at one stage in the products life. I'd say brass was used in this situation as it for-filled the engineers specs .Brass and cast iron are a good combination in engine design and both have been used together for many years so just stick to OEM they do know what they are doing .
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Old 04-13-2016, 07:41 PM   #31
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Yes to the notch cut with a hacksaw. One notch and try the easy out or several and pick out. Try one then the other.

Either heat cycles (to loosen corrosion grip but brass really shouldn't have much in a coolant hose) or cold to shrink and losen...either will work...in this application I like the cold but if heat is handy, start with that.

The internal pipe wrench is nice too if easy to get and not too much $$$$.
Home Depot. Pretty inexpensive. I bought a single but the link is for a set. I used one to extract a broken off shower arm in my home. Worked like a champ.
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Old 04-14-2016, 06:25 PM   #32
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I would replace the brass pipe with either SS pipe nipple or galvanized pipe or plain steel pipe nipple. SS is overkill for this, regular galvanized steel is just fine, your block is not SS.
Plenty of auto engines use steel pipe nipples for hoses.
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Old 04-14-2016, 09:23 PM   #33
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Or as Ski suggested use a hydraulic fitting. Heavier wall, better quality steel. Plus they usually have a hex machined on them so you can use a simple open end wrench, NOT a pipe wrench.
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Old 04-16-2016, 06:29 AM   #34
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That is what I meant, a steel hose end with a hex for a wrench. Plenty are used on auto engines for heater hose connections connected to intake manifolds, should be easy to find in 1/2 5/8 3/4 pipe thread.
Like this Dorman straight nipple. These pipe nipples you might find at AZone even.
DormanŽ 56152 - Steel Heater Hose Fitting (Straight Nipple, 5/8'' x 3/8'' x 1-1/2'', 1 pce)
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Old 04-19-2016, 11:27 PM   #35
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Nipple dilemma solved. I went with a steel hydraulic nipple (with hex in the middle) as a replacement.
For the extraction of the old nipple I used a tool (don't know what you call it) that is about 5 inches long with a square cross section and sharp edges on the square shape. After a good soaking in PB Blaster, I tapped in the tool and slowly but surely removed the obstinate nipple. It really grabbed the soft brass well and never slipped.
The spiral easy out tool that would have worked wanted to bottom out before making a good grab.
While I already have half of the coolant drained it seems like a good time to drain the rest and clean and service the heat exchangers. Never done that before either.
One thing, One thing leads to another. Now I cant get that 1980's song from The Fix out of my head.
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Old 04-20-2016, 12:26 AM   #36
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Maybe Aussie ex Olympic swimmer Grant Hackett has some tips, he reportedly tried shearing off a nipple on a recent domestic flight. Oh wait, different kind of nipple.
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Old 04-20-2016, 12:52 AM   #37
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Had to google that one. I did not see a nipple tweeker at my favorite tool store but I would have to say he is a bit of a tool. Although I have found that it usually takes two tools to create an altercation.
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Old 04-20-2016, 01:17 AM   #38
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Gaston. Why do my drill bits tend to think ss is harder than hell. Rockwell hardness of 304 is 90-100, tool steel somewhere near 70.
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Old 04-20-2016, 07:13 AM   #39
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Gaston. Why do my drill bits tend to think ss is harder than hell. Rockwell hardness of 304 is 90-100, tool steel somewhere near 70.
SS work hardens... So the cutting action hardens it.
Use sharp Cobalt bits and a cutting oil w slow speed and firm pressure..should make things easier.
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