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Old 08-02-2013, 12:11 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by ancora View Post
Another example of "KISS" ignored.

mmmm thats debateable mate!

whilst im all for KISS but IMHO its a good example of poor preventative maintenance.

PSS's dont just explode for no reason and without first showing signs of fatigue.
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Old 08-02-2013, 11:37 AM   #42
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If you read what Baker and Rick B posted, it would seem that what you propose wouldn't be worth the effort as engine water pumps do not push enough water.
It can't hurt ... Mark's engine will move about 20 GPM (1200 GPH) at 1800 rpm so it is at worst case equal to another bilge pump. A separate bilge pickup and strainer could be added to each of those spare fittings to provide a forward and an aft bilge suction.

Not much cost and nothing to lose really.
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Old 08-02-2013, 12:02 PM   #43
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Also made are these. Called a safety seacock.
You just pull the plug.

looks kind of scary to me. What if you bumped it or something.

sd
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Old 08-02-2013, 08:01 PM   #44
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Sd, It would be hard to pull the plug the plug by accident. You have to give it a quarter turn before it will pull out and it takes some effort to turn and pull it. You can also use it to flush your engine with fresh water or winterize it, what ever that is.
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Old 08-02-2013, 11:24 PM   #45
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I've been thinking about this idea of using the engines raw water pump in an emergency, and I see some real challenges with that idea.

1. We're assuming that you can actually get to the valves in an emergency.

2. Unless the engine pump is undersized for the emergency, you're going to run dry. Then unless you're paying super close attention (with everything else that'll be going on) you're going to burn your engines pump impeller, possibly rendering the boat dead in the water.

The more I think about it, the more I like the AC powered pump. The one I posted earlier will move 95 GPM or 5700 GPH at a 5' head. Thats allot of water! More than most engine pumps. It takes approx 7 amps AC, which many of our boats have available using either an inverter or generator. You could also rig the pump up like a standard bilge pump with a on/auto mode switch. This would allow it to cycle, freeing you up to try to find and fix the source of the flooding.

I think the key here is early detection. Bells, lights, buzzers to tell you that you need to take action before the water gets to a point where it overcomes your electrical system.
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Old 08-03-2013, 12:00 AM   #46
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I have a Y valve on my holding tank pumpout line, ahead of the pump, so that I can draw from the bilge, where the line terminates in a flat pickup with a screen. This will help at the rate of the attached pump, and will totally evacuate the part of the bilge in which it sits, as an added bonus. The only downside is that the pump doesn't like being run dry, so you need to keep an eye on it. In a flooding situation, that wouldn't be an issue. I doubt it could keep up to a failed PSS. I know of too many of those that have failed to ever consider having one on my boat.
I also carry a 2" trash pump. Sure it takes up space, but with a blue sunbrella cover, nobody knows how ugly it is.
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Old 08-03-2013, 07:09 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
I've been thinking about this idea of using the engines raw water pump in an emergency, and I see some real challenges with that idea.

1. We're assuming that you can actually get to the valves in an emergency.

2. Unless the engine pump is undersized for the emergency, you're going to run dry. Then unless you're paying super close attention (with everything else that'll be going on) you're going to burn your engines pump impeller, possibly rendering the boat dead in the water.

The more I think about it, the more I like the AC powered pump. The one I posted earlier will move 95 GPM or 5700 GPH at a 5' head. Thats allot of water! More than most engine pumps. It takes approx 7 amps AC, which many of our boats have available using either an inverter or generator. You could also rig the pump up like a standard bilge pump with a on/auto mode switch. This would allow it to cycle, freeing you up to try to find and fix the source of the flooding.

I think the key here is early detection. Bells, lights, buzzers to tell you that you need to take action before the water gets to a point where it overcomes your electrical system.
Absolutely!

The next important thing is progressive flooding. If you have a wide open bilge...you have to keep up with the flooding or be able to slow the flooding down...that's why early detection is important...so you can locate and work around the source of flooding quickly.

If your bilge is segmented into watertight or nearly so compartments...total pumping capacity can be reduced somewhat on how well the compartments are set up.

These are the types of things that help determine whether keeping her afloat will be possible depending on why the flooding is happening. A failed through hull or broken hose or topside water ingestion should be manageable for all boats...a submerged object strike opening even just a small hole and large crack may sink the average trawler unless you are really good with damage control and have someone working repair while another gets one or two 10,000 GPH trash pumps going.
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Old 08-03-2013, 12:19 PM   #48
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I have been the one plugging the hole on a sinking boat it is a unnerving place to be when all you know is the water is rushing in and you can't see daylight. There is a reason salvage is expensive!
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Old 08-03-2013, 06:54 PM   #49
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I have been the one plugging the hole on a sinking boat it is a unnerving place to be when all you know is the water is rushing in and you can't see daylight. There is a reason salvage is expensive!
I'm with you on that. Laying down inside a 40" tunnel with an engine while trying to locate the origin of the gush may be a real test in courage/stupidity.
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