Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-17-2015, 07:09 AM   #1
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,383
Replacing fuel lines

I may need to move a couple of copper fuel lines to make room for a new house bank. I've seen this yellow tubing in newer boats and wonder what it is. Does anyone know how it holds up and its crush and leak resistance? Or is it just copper with a yellow vinyl covering?

__________________
Advertisement

angus99 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 07:24 AM   #2
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
You can buy the sleeving separately or buy tubing with it already fitted.

Copper Clad,Pipe Covers:Sleeve It Ltd - Protective Sleeving

I would just use short pieces of heat shrink to color code where you desire rather than waste money on fully sleeved tubing.
__________________

RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2015, 01:43 PM   #3
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickB View Post
You can buy the sleeving separately or buy tubing with it already fitted.

Copper Clad,Pipe Covers:Sleeve It Ltd - Protective Sleeving

I would just use short pieces of heat shrink to color code where you desire rather than waste money on fully sleeved tubing.
Good idea. Thanks!
angus99 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2015, 07:59 PM   #4
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,383
Still trying to find the best way to do this.

To make room from my house bank, I need to relocate two fuel lines that run side by side from the top of my port tank to the manifold. (One is the return line and the other I haven't figured out yet.) Both lines are copper, the run is less than 10 feet and they each take five 90-degree turns enroute. Their path takes them through a fairly confined space under a stout platform where my battery bank will be located, so forming them in one piece would be difficult. I suppose I could make each run in two pieces joined by flare fittings, but I'd like to minimize joints --especially ones that would be difficult to access if they leak.

Is there a flexible fuel line that would work for this application? I know copper lasts almost forever, but is there a material that is almost as good that's easier to work with?

Thanks in advance.
angus99 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2015, 08:12 PM   #5
Guru
 
TDunn's Avatar
 
City: Maine Coast
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nunes Brothers Raised Deck Cruiser
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 670
You could use fuel hose. Just make sure it is type A-1. It will last a long time and is easy to install.
TDunn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2015, 08:34 PM   #6
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,254
I assumed the yellow coating largely functioned as a way to identify the pipe as a fuel line. Little doubt there is a better purpose. Thus are lines between fuel tanks and manifolds. Between manifolds and engine, they are rubber lines.



__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2015, 09:36 PM   #7
Guru
 
City: kemah
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 997
The coating could have been for identity but maybe not so much in my boat. both the fuel lines and the hydraulic steering lines are the same color. red. I kind of think it was for corrosion. my fuel lines have zero green stuff on them under the coating after 32 years.

I plan on using soft copper tubing from lowes to make my fuel lines. Just put one of those spiral things on the tubing so you can bend it real tight without kinking it and slide it along as you route and bend the tube into place.

Im debating on whether to spray my lines with a spray can of plastikote.
what_barnacles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 08:10 AM   #8
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,515
"I plan on using soft copper tubing from lowes to make my fuel lines. Just put one of those spiral things on the tubing so you can bend it real tight without kinking it and slide it along as you route and bend the tube into place."

These work but really tight bends are hard , and if making a long bendy fuel line it is sometimes hard to remove.

A real tubing bender from the refrigeration guys is not expensive , as usually only one sixe is needed.

Or look at Aircraft Spruce to see what thw AV folks use.

The flair tool for fuel is best from the fridge or AV folks . about $35 , but worth the extra.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 09:22 AM   #9
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,091
Tubing benders - very worthwhile investment for a professional looking job.


$7.49 @ Harbor Freight.
Attached Images
 
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 12:15 PM   #10
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,383
Brilliant!

Thanks, guys.

(You have Harbor--Harbour?-- Freight down under?).
angus99 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 05:22 PM   #11
Guru
 
City: kemah
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 997
I bought a flare make from home depot and it bit into the tubing behind the flare leaving little cuts in it after the flare was made. Didnt look like something Id want in a high vibration application. I'll have to check into what the hvac folks use.
what_barnacles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 06:14 PM   #12
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by what_barnacles View Post
I'll have to check into what the hvac folks use.
With a lot of practice and a little lube you can get away with a home store tool but if you want professional quality work you will have to pay between $150 and $300 for one.

Look at the refrigeration supply houses for examples. If you know someone in the business you can save quite a pile of money but a good tool costs good money for good reasons.
RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 06:57 PM   #13
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,781
We all have quirky opinions and my opposition to copper fuel lines is one of mine. I have no problem with copper lines. What I have a problem with is my lack of the skill and tools to repair a break in such a line when out of range of a mechanic that can do so. Thus I have steadily replaced copper lines with fuel hose. I can replace/repair fuel hose in the most backward location as I have the hose and tools onboard.
__________________
Marty
Bay Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 07:58 PM   #14
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
Thus I have steadily replaced copper lines with fuel hose. .
The rules don't apply to your boat but there is a reason why the CG limits the use of flexible fuel lines to 30 inches on commercial vessels.

If you secure copper tubing against vibration and isolate it with short pieces of flexible hose where appropriate you should never have to worry about needing field repairs.

Even an amateur job can last for years so it isn't like the plumbing has to meet space station QC standards. Buy a fairly good set of tubing tools and a few feet of soft tubing and practice practice practice ... you will soon become an expert.
RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 08:39 PM   #15
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
I'm about to install copper tube fuel lines for my Wabasto heater. Read something here on TF about kinking and was going to go back to hose but did some experiments on my tubing bending it by hand. It passed my tests and I've resumed work on the tubing fuel lines. It's small dia and that helped w the bending tests I'm sure. I may drill a quite angled hole in the cabin bulkhead to keep the fuel line close and tight against the bulkhead both inside and out.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 09:07 PM   #16
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,091
Quote:
Originally Posted by angus99 View Post
Brilliant!

Thanks, guys.

(You have Harbor--Harbour?-- Freight down under?).
No - but we have Google.

I paid about $50 for my Rigid benders, but I do a lot of stainless tubing work.
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2015, 10:05 PM   #17
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
I may drill a quite angled hole in the cabin bulkhead to keep the fuel line close and tight against the bulkhead both inside and out.
Close and tight makes it wear through faster.
RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2015, 06:14 AM   #18
Guru
 
angus99's Avatar
 
City: Signal Mtn., TN
Country: US
Vessel Name: Stella Maris
Vessel Model: Defever 44
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,383
This is very helpful. Thanks. In return I have still more questions.

First about hangers: the ones on my boat are plain copper straps. (28 years of service and no sign that anything has ever chafed through and been replaced.) Mark's Coot pictured above has rubber sleeves inside stainless (I guess) hangers. Are these useful?

Shifting gears, what about PEX for water lines? Easy to install and repair and I like the idea of freeze protection when there's an early cold snap. What say ye?
angus99 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2015, 06:55 AM   #19
Member
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Neried
Vessel Model: Peter Bracken flybridge
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 10
Angus99

Hi Angus

I am a plumber gas fitter by trade 50 years in the game copper lines are good buy a decent set of pipe benders and a flaring tool use copper saddles to fix the pipe to bulkheads or whatever.

Use heavy tape or rubber hose over the pipe before fixing with the saddle and the installation will last longer than the boat

An Australian navel ship had a fire in the engine room a few years ago that killed a number of sailors (may they rest in peace) cause was rubber fuel lines exchanged in a refit for ridged pipe fuel line diesel fuel !!

Regards

Richard
Bracken45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2015, 07:29 AM   #20
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,868
2 things...if you have a fiberglass boat...worrying about metal or rubber hoses is an exercise in only worry. Your boat will be engulfed in fire by the time a fuel line burns all the way through....if that worried (who me with poly tanks that will go long before the lines?)...put remote fuel shutoffs in.


Pex for water lines is GREAT!!!! at least for installs and leak free operation. BickB turned me on to using the stainless clamps and the ratchet crimper. You can reach in and do installs one handed in tight spaces. I keep the extra pex under the v berth and a bag of extra clamps as modifications come up. Out of hundreds of connections through the years...I have never had a connection leak.


I did the entire boat including the salt water washdown system in a couple days.


Once I am satisfied that my whole design is what I want...I may replace a few crimp connections with the push lock kind in areas I need that kind of flexibility. I haven't found the need yet.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012