Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-16-2015, 07:59 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Montenido's Avatar
 
City: SoCal
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ansedonia
Vessel Model: Californian/Carver 52CPMY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 231
Repairing FRP Exhaust "Wye", Advice Needed

Hi folks,

My boat has two 5" diameter FRP 2-into-1 wyes that are for the wet exhaust on each engine (Cat 3208 NA). One of them has a small crack that drips saltwater. Can I repair this with epoxy, or should I use some type of high temperature resin? I think that I can do it from the inside of the wye, and then finish it on the outside. Has anybody done a repair like this?

Thanks for any tips.

Cheers, Bill
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
"There is simply nothing more worth while than messing around in boats."
Montenido is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 08:44 PM   #2
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: East Greenwich, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bella
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,881
Bill:


I would do this just like any other fiberglass repair. Grind the crack out and taper it back an inch or two. Then lay up glass and resin over the crack. You can use epoxy or polyester resin. Epoxy sticks better in a repair situation.


Epoxy alone will soon crack again.


David
__________________

djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 07:59 AM   #3
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,801
You need a high temperature rated resin. Recommend you contact one of the exhaust specialists like MESA or D'Angelo and they can hook you up with the right product. This is a system that can sink or burn down your boat.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 12:43 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Montenido's Avatar
 
City: SoCal
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ansedonia
Vessel Model: Californian/Carver 52CPMY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 231
Thanks for the replies. I think I might try JB Weld high temperature epoxy putty to begin with. The crack is just hairline and not structural. Has anybody used this before? If this doesn't work, I'll do it the proper way.

Cheers, Bill
__________________
"There is simply nothing more worth while than messing around in boats."
Montenido is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 02:57 PM   #5
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,740
I personally wouldn't do a temporary that might work repair. May as well fiberglass it and be done. If the repair is on the outside of a wet exhaust
There must be a supplier in your area that can recommend the right resin.
Or there are internet sources as well.
I use LBI (Legnos Boat Inc) out of Groton, Ct because they are local to me.
There might be info on their website or give them a call.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct. /New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 03:03 PM   #6
Guru
 
C lectric's Avatar
 
City: Somewhere
Country: , Canada
Vessel Name: Island Pride
Vessel Model: Palmer sedan 32'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,872
YOur choice but consider that if you simply cover it up, which is likely what you are going to do, that the next time the crack appears it will be bigger as it will grow. Do it right now and you won;t be redoing later.
If it comes back it may not do it at a convenient time.

Caltexflanc has a serious point.


If you go with the JB then at least use a couple layers of 6 oz cloth in the repair , working the JB right in like you would with any resin.

Also take a good look at the support. Maybe the exhaust hose is hanging from the wye which is what started the crack. Pieces like this are not meant to be structural. Do a good repair and check the support. Add a hanger or two to take any load/weight off.
C lectric is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 04:15 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Montenido's Avatar
 
City: SoCal
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ansedonia
Vessel Model: Californian/Carver 52CPMY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 231
You guys are right - fix it correctly the first time. I will get some high temp epoxy and do it right.

Cheers, Bill
__________________
"There is simply nothing more worth while than messing around in boats."
Montenido is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 04:24 PM   #8
Guru
 
City: gulf coast
Country: pinellas
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,199
Figure out why it cracked first. Those things should not be under stress.
bayview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 07:06 PM   #9
Guru
 
City: kemah
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montenido View Post
You guys are right - fix it correctly the first time.
That would be with a new Y.
what_barnacles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2015, 07:50 AM   #10
Guru
 
Shoalwaters's Avatar
 
City: Rodney Bay Lagoon
Country: St. Lucia, West Indies
Vessel Name: "Dragon Lady"
Vessel Model: DeFever 41
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
I would do this just like any other fiberglass repair. Grind the crack out and taper it back an inch or two. Then lay up glass and resin over the crack. You can use epoxy or polyester resin. Epoxy sticks better in a repair situation. Epoxy alone will soon crack again.
I agree, this is the right way to do it. No special hi-temp resins required as the raw-water/exhaust mix that passes through this fitting is no hotter than bath water. I would use epoxy resin though - it is a much better adhesive than ordinary polyester resin. I suggest washing the surfaces with acetone after grinding and before applying the mat and resin. This will avoid those little fish-eye shapes in the resin caused by residual grease or oil.
__________________
Mike
If all else fails, read the instructions
If it ain't broke, don't fix it
Shoalwaters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2015, 09:51 AM   #11
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoalwaters View Post
I agree, this is the right way to do it. No special hi-temp resins required as the raw-water/exhaust mix that passes through this fitting is no hotter than bath water.
FYI, if the water flow becomes restricted, or cuts out completely, the exhaust gases are no longer at "bath water" temperature.

At the very least he should use the high temp JB Weld.
Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2015, 08:54 PM   #12
Guru
 
City: kemah
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 997
LOL stop it. Do not repair the Y, replace it.

Youre talking about something that can flood your engine room and possibly sink your boat. Think not? What about getting caught in a storm and the same forces that cracked it the first time reappear, and your glued to the instruments and outside the windshield. You'll never know it's flooding your bilge until you have way too much in there.
what_barnacles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 09:33 AM   #13
Guru
 
City: Venice Louisiana
Country: United States
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,097
I guess I dont understand why a person would want to replace a piece of equipment that is easily repairable, and expensive. Personally, I would probably remove it and clean it up really good, then wrap it with 3 or 4 layers of "glass cloth and a good 4 to epoxy. If the crack is accessible I mite repair it in place, as long as I could still completely wrap the area with epoxy/"glass cloth. You can get 'glass "tape" in whatever width and weight needed. This is all just basic fiberglass repair, not rocket science.
kulas44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 09:54 AM   #14
Veteran Member
 
MICH MIKE's Avatar
 
City: WIXOM
Country: USA
Vessel Name: INCOGNITO
Vessel Model: 34 MARINE TRADER
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 26
If you do the temporary repair while waiting for the new part, I would suggest 'stop drilling' small holes at the ends of the crack before applying the bandaid.
__________________
Mike Koski
32' Marine Trader........... 34' Marine Trader
" Curvaceous "............... " Incognito "
Newport, MI ................. Marathon, FL
MICH MIKE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 10:31 AM   #15
Guru
 
Capt.Bill11's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota/Ft. Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 5,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by what_barnacles View Post
LOL stop it. Do not repair the Y, replace it.

Youre talking about something that can flood your engine room and possibly sink your boat. Think not? What about getting caught in a storm and the same forces that cracked it the first time reappear, and your glued to the instruments and outside the windshield. You'll never know it's flooding your bilge until you have way too much in there.

That's why you should have a high water alarm.

It sounds like a simple repairable crack to me. I mean you don't buy a new boat if you crack the hull.
Capt.Bill11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 10:54 AM   #16
Guru
 
Scary's Avatar
 
City: Walnut Grove Ca
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cary'D Away
Vessel Model: Hatteras 48 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 884
Repair it

Grind out cracks 15 to 1. Add chopped fiberglas to your choice of resin. If you chose epoxy most mats are not compatible with epoxy resin. The binders will not wetout. If you can wrap the crack with fabric that will add strength. Jb weld has its uses , this probably not my choice for this repair.
Scary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 11:42 AM   #17
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,801
Quote:
No special hi-temp resins required as the raw-water/exhaust mix that passes through this fitting is no hotter than bath water
I'd invite you to stick a temp probe in there sometime, since sticking your hand in there isn't possible. Now true, the place where it is leaking is "water cooled" ... water that has been through various heat exchangers and is now in contact with exhaust gasses. But you will want to thoroughly seal the area around the crack as well. Not having seen the suspect crack, I don't know how big the crack is or what its root causes may be (an important point raised by other posters). I certainly would want a professional opinion, rather than merely rely on us internet cowboys with no first hand view of or vested interest in the problem or the outcome of the fix.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 12:19 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Montenido's Avatar
 
City: SoCal
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ansedonia
Vessel Model: Californian/Carver 52CPMY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 231
Hi folks,

Thanks for the lively answers, here is a bit more information. It is a hairline crack with some salt residue leaking out, nothing structural. Chances are it has been this way for quite some time. The crack is accessible, and on the bottom of the wye, so water probably normally flows over this area. I have very good fiberglassing skills, as I have been making repairs since I was a teenager (a LONG time ago, lol). I do have a high-water alarm. The leak is virtually dry under operation, I just want to fix it as the boat is new to me. I have ordered some high temperature epoxy that will certainly do the trick.

Once again, thank you all for your input.

Cheers, Bill
__________________
"There is simply nothing more worth while than messing around in boats."
Montenido is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2015, 06:36 PM   #19
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,371
I'd be concerned about aging FRP parts going through rigorous heating and cooling cycles with resultant brittleness.

My 2 Ceteks showed a few salt crusts since new that have been successfully covered by JB. Only when vessel running with no signs of moisture at rest. Cetek says not uncommon.

But if a crack showed up I'd replace them in a heartbeat. Not because I'd worry about the boat sinking though, just all that sooty exhaust in the ER.

In many vessels regular and thorough checks occur while underway - roomy ER advantage so little things can be monitored. If OP's vessel is a hatch lifter and this elbow not easy to routinely observe, I'd consider replacement.
__________________

sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
exhaust tube, repair

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012