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Old 08-15-2016, 02:31 PM   #1
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Raw Water Strainers Metal or Plastic?

I need to order spare strainers. Which is the better way to go? Stainless Steel or Plastic?
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Old 08-15-2016, 02:36 PM   #2
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I have very old plastic ones that are still serviceable....some stainless have come apart within the decade.
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Old 08-15-2016, 02:40 PM   #3
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I need to order spare strainers. Which is the better way to go? Stainless Steel or Plastic?
I put a plastic one in my 2" Groco strainer and have been very happy with it. They are recommended for high use time applications such as raw water for air conditioning. The one I removed had lost it's bottom through electrolysis. The alternative is SS and attaching a zinc to it for a sacrificial element.

Ted
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Old 08-16-2016, 04:45 PM   #4
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Old 08-16-2016, 05:19 PM   #5
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I assume you are talking about the strainer baskets not the strainers themselves.

If so, I'd go with the plastic strainer baskets.

And I'd order extra baskets at least for the A/C and genset (if you have one) strainers so you can change them on the fly if need be. Then you can clean the dirty one at your leisure.
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Old 08-16-2016, 05:28 PM   #6
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Great idea to have spare strainer baskets. Thanks Capt!
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Old 08-16-2016, 05:34 PM   #7
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I put a plastic one in my 2" Groco strainer and have been very happy with it. They are recommended for high use time applications such as raw water for air conditioning. The one I removed had lost it's bottom through electrolysis. The alternative is SS and attaching a zinc to it for a sacrificial element.

Ted
If your seacock was a Groco, it was silicon bronze. If your basket was 304/316 stainless then electrolytic corrosion was not part of the problem.

Electrolysis had nothing to do with it.
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Old 08-16-2016, 07:52 PM   #8
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I put a plastic one in my 2" Groco strainer and have been very happy with it. They are recommended for high use time applications such as raw water for air conditioning. The one I removed had lost it's bottom through electrolysis. The alternative is SS and attaching a zinc to it for a sacrificial element.

Ted
Would not the bonding of the strainer eliminate the need for a zinc on the basket? I've had stainless baskets for years and never had any issues in salt or fresh water. I do twist them once in to insure they are seated. Maybe I'm making better electrical contact that way.
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Old 08-16-2016, 08:20 PM   #9
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If your seacock was a Groco, it was silicon bronze. If your basket was 304/316 stainless then electrolytic corrosion was not part of the problem.

Electrolysis had nothing to do with it.
Must have been the stainless steel eating worms. What does the seacock have to do with it? The seacock wasn't bonded to the strainer; a rubber hose separated the two of them. BTW, the seacock was plastic. When I replaced the seacock and redid the plumbing, I installed a bronze seacock and tied both to the ships bonding system. Groco recommends the plastic strainer for applications such as AC where the pump has a high duty cycle. What to you think ate through the stainless if it wasn't electrolysis?

Ted
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Old 08-16-2016, 08:31 PM   #10
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Would not the bonding of the strainer eliminate the need for a zinc on the basket? I've had stainless baskets for years and never had any issues in salt or fresh water. I do twist them once in to insure they are seated. Maybe I'm making better electrical contact that way.
I don't know. When I reworked my raw water system, I tied the new seacock and the strainer to the ships bonding system. While I like stainless, after seeing the strainer basket bottom separated from the basket, I decided to try the plastic one. Think the plastic basket cost me $20 for the 2" strainer.

Clearly the corrosion didn't occur over night. So just thoroughly check the stainless each time you pull the basket. There may be enough bonding where it isn't a problem in your situation.

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Old 08-16-2016, 08:33 PM   #11
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Never use a plastic strainer basket! They last way too long and I can't get rich selling replacement baskets! Seriously, the plastic does seem to last longer. The holes are usually a little bigger but I've never heard of anyone having a problem because of that.

Pgitug, I was on your side of the world last weekend. Had dinner at the Torch restaurant. Outstanding food!
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Old 08-16-2016, 08:33 PM   #12
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Must have been the stainless steel eating worms. What does the seacock have to do with it? The seacock wasn't bonded to the strainer; a rubber hose separated the two of them. BTW, the seacock was plastic. When I replaced the seacock and redid the plumbing, I installed a bronze seacock and tied both to the ships bonding system. Groco recommends the plastic strainer for applications such as AC where the pump has a high duty cycle. What to you think ate through the stainless if it wasn't electrolysis?

Ted
Electrolysis - A chemical change in an electrolyte due to the passage of current.

i.e. Electrolysis is what happens to the electrolyte, not the metals.
You may mean electrolytic corrosion or galvanic corrosion but again, "electrolysis" is irrelevant.

You may have simply had shitty Chinese "stainless" but silicon bronze and the stainless usually used in marine applications (304/316) are close enough on the galvanic (or Noble) scale to silicon bronze that any electrolytic activity would be extremely small and with virtually no measurable corrosion for many decades.
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Old 08-16-2016, 08:46 PM   #13
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I will definitely pay close attention to them!
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Old 08-16-2016, 08:57 PM   #14
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Electrolysis - A chemical change in an electrolyte due to the passage of current.

i.e. Electrolysis is what happens to the electrolyte, not the metals.
You may mean electrolytic corrosion or galvanic corrosion but again, "electrolysis" is irrelevant.

You may have simply had shitty Chinese "stainless" but silicon bronze and the stainless usually used in marine applications (304/316) are close enough on the galvanic (or Noble) scale to silicon bronze that any electrolytic activity would be extremely small and with virtually no measurable corrosion for many decades.
I bow in defeat to the grammar police.

The stainless deteriorated above the plastic basket bottom to the point where the bottom fell off in less than 12 years. Haven't seen any after market stainless baskets for Groco strainers. On their advise, I went plastic.

In your opinion, what was the deterioration process of the stainless and how would you prevent it's reoccurrance?

Ted
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Old 08-16-2016, 09:03 PM   #15
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I switched to plastic, the metal ones seemed to get deformed for some reason.
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Old 08-16-2016, 09:04 PM   #16
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No grammar involved. I believe correct terminology makes it easier for everyone involved. I often tell clients that if a "marine" electrician uses the term "electrolysis" they should hire someone else because they clearly do not understand electricity or corrosion.
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Old 08-16-2016, 10:38 PM   #17
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My metal ones don`t degrade or deform, but do attack my fingers when I try to withdraw them for cleaning. They resemble a cheese/finger grater, lacking a moulding at the ends,leaving a cut sharp edge.
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Old 08-17-2016, 12:46 AM   #18
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In your opinion...... how would you prevent it's reoccurrance?

Ted
Buy a plastic one....DUH!!!!
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Old 08-17-2016, 07:10 AM   #19
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Perko strainers are supplied with stainless strainer baskets. Boats which run their airco's 24/7 often eat these baskets. Installing plastic ones may appear to be the answer, but I would like to know what is eating the stainless in case it is a symptom of a bigger problem.
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Old 08-17-2016, 07:26 AM   #20
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That is a valid point. A few years ago I was dealing with a corrosion problem, and I said "electrolysis". The marine electrician asked me if we were looking at a situation regarding the removal of women's body hair. I have been careful to use "GC" ever since.

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No grammar involved. I believe correct terminology makes it easier for everyone involved. I often tell clients that if a "marine" electrician uses the term "electrolysis" they should hire someone else because they clearly do not understand electricity or corrosion.
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