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Old 12-10-2012, 07:06 AM   #1
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Raw Water Strainer Opinion

Skinny Dippin's old strainer isn't in the best condition and I would also want to relocate it. I saw this on ShipShapeTV this week and like the idea of it.

Perko Flushing Bronze Sea Strainer

Any opinions on having a hose connection on a strainer? Can a hose supply enough water to keep a diesel cool while it flushes?

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Old 12-10-2012, 09:42 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by GonzoF1 View Post
Skinny Dippin's old strainer isn't in the best condition and I would also want to relocate it. I saw this on ShipShapeTV this week and like the idea of it.

Perko Flushing Bronze Sea Strainer

Any opinions on having a hose connection on a strainer? Can a hose supply enough water to keep a diesel cool while it flushes?

Tom-
No opinion on the particular strainer or Perko, but did you notice all the "wrong" (I could use the word "lies") information they both stated in trying to sell that product?

"Most blue water boats use seawater to cool their engines." - I don't think so, not at all. I/O runabouts and small cruisers, perhaps, but I'm pretty sure most "blue water boats" will be found to have closed coolong systems.

There's no harm in flushing the seawater side of a closed cooling system, but these systems are designed not to need flushing on a day to day basis.

Would a hose supply enough water to keep a disesl cool while it flushes? It depends on the diameter and length of the hose and the water pressure at the faucet, but I suspect it would. You would be running at idle speed and only for a few minutes. You can run a diesel at idle speed for several minutes with no cooling water flow. Don't ask me how I know that.
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:48 AM   #3
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I have a 1 inch raw water pump and it takes two 3/4 inch hoses running full to run my little Kubota at 1200 rpm. Faster than that the hoses won't keep up.
Might be nice for winterization or a quick flush though.
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Old 12-10-2012, 10:28 AM   #4
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I think all, 4 of the Eagle strainers are that brand, at least they look like that. The Eagle has one on Each of the Engines raw water intake to protect the water pump impeller. With the Deep draft we have some close to the bottom and tend to suck up stuff. I have them connected to the Zinc loop and after 20+ years still seem to be in good shape and they still make replacement parts.
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Old 12-10-2012, 11:27 AM   #5
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Well, I haven't flushed the raw water side in the three years I have owned her. Wouldn't it be time to loop a little muratic acid through the system? (or would that eat the impeller?)
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Old 12-10-2012, 11:51 AM   #6
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Well, I haven't flushed the raw water side in the three years I have owned her. Wouldn't it be time to loop a little muratic acid through the system? (or would that eat the impeller?)
There are folks who do that for a living and they would probably know best, but I think they just run the acid through the rest of the system (the heat exchangers and coolers) with their own pump and without running the engine.
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Old 12-10-2012, 12:26 PM   #7
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Well, I haven't flushed the raw water side in the three years I have owned her. Wouldn't it be time to loop a little muratic acid through the system? (or would that eat the impeller?)
We haven't flushed the raw water side of our cooling system in the 14+ years we've owned the boat, and we've not had anyone in the marine diesel business say we should. The waterflow out our exhausts is unchanged since we bought the boat. Well, actually, that's not true. It got stronger when we got rid of the stock Jabsco pump/Lehman drive coupler setup and installed larger Johnson pumps.
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:34 PM   #8
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With the Deep draft we have some close to the bottom ...
ROFL ... considering your draft is only about 12 inches more than a little GB that's 22 feet shorter I think your "close to the bottom" experiences were related to something other than "deep draft."
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:37 PM   #9
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We haven't flushed the raw water side of our cooling system in the 14+ years we've owned the boat, and we've not had anyone in the marine diesel business say we should.
It all depends on where the boat lives. There are places where flushing the raw water side every couple of months is all but mandatory.
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:53 PM   #10
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It all depends on where the boat lives. There are places where flushing the raw water side every couple of months is all but mandatory.
And those places are ................................... ?

And the reason is ........................................ ?
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Old 12-10-2012, 05:12 PM   #11
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I think it's more common to flush engines that don't use a heat exchanger but pump salt water through the cooling jackets of the engine. I have never flushed my engine. I did replace the heat exchanger once in twenty years.
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Old 12-10-2012, 05:53 PM   #12
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Considering how much slim builds up on the bottom of our boat in the river where we reside, I suspect there is a certain amount of that goo in our heat exchanger that needs flushing out.
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:51 PM   #13
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And those places are ................................... ?

And the reason is ........................................ ?
Parts of south Florida for one. Marine flora and fauna in the sea chests and heat exchangers.
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:02 PM   #14
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It all depends on where the boat lives. There are places where flushing the raw water side every couple of months is all but mandatory.
Good point. I have not operated boats in warmer waters (the ones I fished and sailed on in Hawaii were not mine so I was not involved in their maintenance). So I tend to think only in terms of our colder water with shorter days half the year.
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:34 AM   #15
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There are two primary reasons to flush a boat's engine or cooling system:

1) Raw water cooled engines, if operated in salt water, should be flushed with fresh water and perhaps a salt reducing product after each use if possible, but in any event, as often as possible and before storage. This flushing prolongs the life of the engine, especially the manifolds and risers.

2) Fresh water cooled engines (closed cooling system with anti freeze in the engine) may need their cooling systems (heat exchangers, oil coolers, etc.) flushed from time to time with acid or other products designed to kill and remove marine growth. The same appies to air conditioning systems.

The product featured on ShipShape TV and mentioned by the OP seems more suited to a raw water cooled engine on a boat that's kept in the water and not easily flushed. Most of us with closed cooling systems don't need to flush the heat exchangers, etc. after each use and that product isn't suited for acid cleaning.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:44 AM   #16
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Depends on the engine.

My experience with raw water cooled is limited to outboards, a Yanmar YSE12 that was in my first sailboat and a Volvo gasser in a 19 ft speedboat.

My current outboard, a Honda 40, needs to be flushed. I found tis out the hard way.

The yanmar was installed in 1977 when I built the boat. I sold in 1988, never flushed and never a problem. Talked to the current owner in 2007. He worked at Yanmar and put in a new engine that year. When he inspected the old engine, after 30 yrs, he claimed the water passages were all clear.

The gasser lived on a trailer, so to protect from frost, it got flushed and drained regularly, so I don't know how well it would have fared without.

I have never flushed the fresh water side of a heat exchanger. When I cleaned the HEs this year, after 12 years, one engine HE and trans HE needed it, as the salt scale was building and partially clogging some of the small pipes. The other trans HE was almost perfectly clear and that engine runs cooler than the one done first, so I haven't done it yet.

flushing with acid is no substitute for removal and inspection. I have found all sorts of debris in teh HE end caps. broken zincs, bits of impeller, lumps of mush. A blind acid flush won't get rid of all of that.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:58 AM   #17
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The product featured on ShipShape TV and mentioned by the OP seems more suited to a raw water cooled engine on a boat that's kept in the water and not easily flushed. Most of us with closed cooling systems don't need to flush the heat exchangers, etc. after each use and that product isn't suited for acid cleaning.
Why is that? No one is talking about circulating pure hydrocholoric acid throught the thing, though that would work great. I figure if a chemical won't kill you it isn't strong enough to do a good job.

Strainers are used for more than just engines ... A/C cooling water for one, washdowns, etc. There is nothing wrong with fresh water flushing a seawater circ system.
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Old 12-11-2012, 02:05 PM   #18
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......... No one is talking about circulating pure hydrocholoric acid throught the thing, though that would work great. .......... .
The OP asked about that very thing in post #5. And no, it wouldn't work great for that unless the plan was to run acid through it, the cooling system, and out into the sea.

A better plan is to disconnect the hoses at both ends of the cooling system and recirculate the acid throughout the system with an external pump and then recover the acid and dispose of it properly.
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Old 12-11-2012, 06:59 PM   #19
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Hmm... didn't think about the flushing acid out to sea part... Ooops. maybe I need to engineer a circulating pump rig myself for it. Good point. Thanks.

The story also said it can be used as an emergengy bilge pump, but the effectiveness of it and the ability to deploy it under conditions when you need it are very questionable.

I may end up with it anyway should the price be in the range. Current one does need replacing and relocating.

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Old 12-12-2012, 11:52 AM   #20
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Most engine manufacturers will recommend the heat exchanger and intercoolers be cleaned at some regular interval, and that can be higher or lower depending on the waters the boat is in. In the southeast, for the most part, the heat exchangers should be checked, and cleaned if necessary every time you flush the freshwater system per the engine's PM schedule. These guys have a great product and will even sell you a set up to DIY that will also do your air conditioning system, though a similar kit can be made very cheaply by a handy person. I generally have the flush done and clean done by a mechanic as part of a broader "check up". Maintaining the cooling system is one of the critical PM requirements for diesels; failure due to over heating is invariably catastrophic.

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