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Old 10-28-2012, 07:45 PM   #41
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He said that because propane mixes so well with the air and the fact that propane has a higher octtane than gasoline you get a much more complete burn of the fuel compared to small carburator gasoline motors.
It burns cleanly but octane has nothing has nothing to do with that. Octane is a measure of knock resistance, nothing more, nothing less.
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Old 10-29-2012, 12:09 AM   #42
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Rick, you're correct, the higher octane of propane doesn't get you any more power unless you increase the compression ratio to take advantage of it. These engines have compression ratios calculated to take advantage of the higher octane of propane.
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Old 10-30-2012, 01:00 AM   #43
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Any idea how they start in c-c-c-cold weather? I might be interested in the 9.9 as an emergency kicker...which brings up another question, will there be a high thrust model?
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Old 10-30-2012, 08:29 AM   #44
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A propane engine will burn a bit more fuel than a gas engine.

You will not notice a difference in sound.

There will probably be a slight propane smell.

Most propane engines run perfect all the time and no choke will be necessary.

Propane is very cheap right now compared to gasoline and I'm considering converting my old Buick but the cost of fuel for a small OB is fly stuff.

The safety issue in a boat is dependent mostly on the chances of it leaking into the boat and how much of it would be a real hazard. The probability of fuel line connectors leaking should be investigated.

Right now the availability of the two fuels is the probably the only significant difference between the propane OB and the gas OB. And for that reason I'd choose gas at this time.
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Old 10-30-2012, 09:43 AM   #45
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My preliminary mind's eye picture is of a fibreglass tank (or two?) mounted on the corner(s) of the swim grid. Zero leakage hazard.

Our area is sparsely populated and marinas are about 50 miles apart so a dependable kicker is something to seriously consider, especially if you want to go poking around in the more remote nooks and crannies.

Dependable cold weather starts are a must.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:45 AM   #46
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Murray, I don't know about cold weather starting, the ones I've played with were all in Florida. I started a 2.5 hp Lehr about thirty times yesterday. It started on the first pull all but once. The weather was clear and cool in the low seventies. (note to Chamber of Commerce, don't forget to send the check).

Low temperature starts is certainly a concern. I'll see what I can find out.

I haven't heard any talk of a high thrust version, but I'll ask. I think that's a great idea. Some kicker motors don't get used often and the carbs can gum up between uses. Not a problem with propane. What horse power would you be interested in?
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Old 10-30-2012, 11:05 AM   #47
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HopCar: How do the outboards run on a propane/butane blend? Outside the US, so called "propane" can have more butane than propane percentage wise in the blend. The warmer the country the higher the butane concentration. I know the higher blends don't burn as hot when grilling or using the stove/oven so I'm curious about the blends and their effect on the propane outboards performance.
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Old 10-30-2012, 11:10 AM   #48
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Dependable cold weather starts are a must.
Starts probably won't be much of a problem. Keeping it running and producing useful power might be.

http://www.documentation.emersonproc...500147t012.pdf
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Old 10-30-2012, 04:13 PM   #49
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Re the cold start concern I worked where we had 5 or 6 small trucks running on propane in western Washington State and never experienced any starting problems. I also had my family car running on propane and no troubles either. In Minnesota in January ther'e could be issues but who'd be boating then and there.

But I wouldn't buy a small propane OB. Just not enough advantages. But a 75hp two stroke OB I'd consider w it's much lower weight.
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Old 10-30-2012, 05:08 PM   #50
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My preliminary mind's eye picture is of a fibreglass tank (or two?) mounted on the corner(s) of the swim grid. Zero leakage hazard.

Our area is sparsely populated and marinas are about 50 miles apart so a dependable kicker is something to seriously consider, especially if you want to go poking around in the more remote nooks and crannies.

Dependable cold weather starts are a must.
If you're thinking of storing propane on a boat, you might want to consider a ready made propane locker or at the very least, copy the construction and safety features of a commercial propane locker.
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Old 10-30-2012, 08:10 PM   #51
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Manyboats, if they made a small 2 cycle engine sized for your dinghy would you be interested in propane?

What would you use a 75 HP 2 cycle for?
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Old 10-30-2012, 09:54 PM   #52
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HopCar,
75hpOB? ... I'd replace my 60hp ridiculously heavy 4 stroke for a much lighter engine that burns $2 a gallon fuel. The propane OB would be stone age simple compared to the very advanced fuel injected 4 stroke. It's so complicated it scares me but it runs extremely well ... no perfect .. and that counts for a lot but if I was shopping and a 2 stroke propane 3 or 4 cyl OB was available I 'd probably would buy one. I should admit here that no such thing exists and ther'e is probably a very good reason for that. I think we talked about 2 stroke propane OBs before.

Small 2 stroke propane OBs? What advantage would they have? The only thing I don't like about small (2 to 6hp) OBs is that they shake too much and would like to see multi-cylinder 2 stroke engines. I had a 3hp Evinrude. It was perfect except it had seen too much sea water and had cooling system issues. Would sure love to have a new one. The Evinrude weighed 34 lbs and had two cylinders. Four times as many power strokes per revolution as the 4 stroke singles.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:07 PM   #53
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What horse power would you be interested in?
I hear there is a 9.9 coming soon...that's the one I'd be interested in taking a look at.
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Old 10-30-2012, 11:18 PM   #54
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"Small 2 stroke propane OBs? What advantage would they have?"
Same advantage big two strokes have over four strokes, weight.
I'm buying a 37 pound four stroke to replace a 22 pound 2 stroke.
That 15 pounds will make a difference to my back and my canoe.
I will get 1/2 horse power more and a neutral for the additional weight.
It will also start when I pull the string after sitting a few weeks.

I agree with you about multi cylinder vs single cylinder.

Murray, I saw the 9.9 Lehr at the show. They should be available in a month or two.
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Old 10-31-2012, 12:42 AM   #55
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Wha? My 1981, five-horsepower, two-cycle, one-cylinder Seagull was smooooth.
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Old 10-31-2012, 01:03 AM   #56
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Starts probably won't be much of a problem. Keeping it running and producing useful power might be.

http://www.documentation.emersonproc...500147t012.pdf
Thanks for that,

Temperatures do go down to -20 Celsius, or -4 fahrenheit around here a couple times a winter, but at that point the channels are thick with fog and the anchorages begin to freeze due to the large amounts of fresh water flowing into them. Think I'll be staying home during the coldest cold snaps.

The lowest temperatures I'd be heading out in would be around minus 10 Celsius, or 14 degrees fahrenheit. The propane should still be "perky" at that temperature, shouldn't it, as long as the tank was full?
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Old 10-31-2012, 04:48 AM   #57
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Wha? My 1981, five-horsepower, two-cycle, one-cylinder Seagull was smooooth.
Yeah, but that was just because it wouldn't start.
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Old 10-31-2012, 04:53 AM   #58
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The lowest temperatures I'd be heading out in would be around minus 10 Celsius, or 14 degrees fahrenheit. The propane should still be "perky" at that temperature, shouldn't it, as long as the tank was full?
Probably but who knows. The draw off rate is going to be small for a tiny outboard but with a cold and frosted tank the amount you can boil off goes down rapidly with temperature, just drawing it off lowers the temperature until no matter how full the tank is the pressure becomes too low to supply the engine.

Larger engines use a "vaporizer" to ensure a supply of gas at all flow rates. Again though, these things are so small it might not matter.
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Old 10-31-2012, 10:01 AM   #59
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It wouldn't be too dificult to put the outboard and the propane tank into a home freezer for a few hours and then try to start it.

That is, if one really wanted to know. It would be a good question to ask of the manufacturer. I would think they would have already tested the motor at low temperatures.
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Old 10-31-2012, 10:04 AM   #60
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A two cycle outboard is great in the case of a dinghy where you may have to lift the motor on and off the dinghy. The decrease in weight is significant.

Unfortunately, the USA's EPA doesn't care much about our silly little problems and has pretty much made them unavailable in the USA.
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