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Old 01-23-2016, 12:56 PM   #1
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Prelube setup

I have a Lehman sp135. I would like to plumb my Reverso oil drain/fill pump such that I can use it as a pre-start lube pump.
Is this a good idea?
Has anyone done it?
If so could you please explain or diagram the plumbing.
Thank you in advance.
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Old 01-23-2016, 01:16 PM   #2
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I have seen a product for that purpose, so you might investigate that. I considered installing that on my last boat's 892s, but was persuaded it is more trouble than it is worth. I also considered having it installed when my current boat was commissioned, but was again persuaded that it isn't worth the cost or complexity, particularly for two reasons: 1) the engines are QSM 11's, which are electronically controlled and turn over 4 revolutions before ignition -- supposedly that is enough to produce oil flow/pressure before the loads of a running engine can do any damage to bearings, and 2) the way I use my boat, once the engines are started, I keep them running at least for hours, often for days, so the startup is relatively inconsequential.

The theory that prelube extends engine life is predicated on the assumption that a lot of bearing wear occurs at startup. I don't know the empirical evidence for that but do note that some high-end cars with expensive engines shut down the engine when idled (at a red light for example) more than a few seconds, and start right up when the accelerator is pressed. If the startup was causing lots of wear, I would think that those cars, especially if used primarily for city driving, would have drastically shortened engine life expectancy.
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Old 01-23-2016, 01:27 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by petdoc4u View Post
I have a Lehman sp135. I would like to plumb my Reverso oil drain/fill pump such that I can use it as a pre-start lube pump.
Is this a good idea?
Has anyone done it?
If so could you please explain or diagram the plumbing.
Thank you in advance.
The question I raise is why? If you think your engine needs pre lube which I doubt You can turn it over a little without a start with a kill switch or whatever(but not too much don't want to pour water into engine from exhaust SX). From what I have read about modern oil and its adhesion to parts very few engines would need pre lube if used at even moderate use intervals. Also I doubt that there are many engines in recreational use that die from old age and a lack of pre-lubing even though on a theoretical basis that instant start may be of greater wear potential. But if you really need a winter project go for it.
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Old 01-23-2016, 01:32 PM   #4
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In as much as I already have the reverso I thought that it wouldent be too complicated or difficult to run a loop to provide for prelube.
Sounds like perhaps it would have little benefit and therefore not worth the effort.
I appreciate your input- thanks
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Old 01-23-2016, 01:45 PM   #5
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Can a rubber veined impeller develop enough pressure to do any good?

The pre-oilers I am familiar with use steel gears, It takes a good amount of pressure as well as volume to get oil into the bearings.

KISS, good oil and change it, use the boat and your engine will be happy. Don't add a point of failure that Murphy can exploit some dark and stormy night.


I would think that tapping into the oil cooler would be a good place to start. You do need a bunch of volume to do any good so use a large enough pump and I would add valves to isolate if needed at some point.


Or you could add a pressure chamber to be pressurized with the engine oil pump that holds that oil until you start up then pushes it back into the engine for a pre-lube.
http://www.accusump.com/
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Old 01-23-2016, 01:47 PM   #6
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Crank and bearings stay wet with oil for weeks after shutdown. Enough to build up an oil film in the same manner as if bearing was prelubed. Film builds up in less than half a rev.

I've taken a bunch of engines apart and almost never seen worn bearings.

And I've seen a backyard style prelube device on a Cat have a fitting fail, it dumped the sump and toasted the engine. He took the devices off when he put in the new engine.

I like prelubing engines that have sat for years, but not the ones that have sat for a few months.
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Old 01-23-2016, 02:19 PM   #7
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Thanks for the eye-opening comments. I guess I'll move on to my next project.
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Old 01-23-2016, 03:53 PM   #8
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but do note that some high-end cars with expensive engines shut down the engine when idled (at a red light for example) more than a few seconds, and start right up when the accelerator is pressed.
This is becoming very common in Europe on all types of vehicles from cheap to expensive. Every vehicle we've rented in the UK and France over the last few years has had this feature. On the cars and minivans we've had it was a selectable feature; it can be turned on or off at will via a menu.
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Old 01-23-2016, 04:08 PM   #9
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I have a pre lube pump on my Perkins T6354. The lines leaked a lot so I had new ones made and changed them last winter. It was a hell of a job getting to the fitting that attaches where the drain plug used to be. It had a quick disconnect that leaked so I piped it into a mini manifold so that I could hopefully use it for an oil change pump. Well, oil change time cam in November and all it did was spit small amounts of oil. Now I read in this thread that I don't really need it?
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Old 01-23-2016, 04:19 PM   #10
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My boat had prelubers on both CATS when I bought it. One pump failed and the replacement pump was $2,500. They are high pressure pumps. I knew if I replaced it, the second pump wasn't far behind. I spoke to my Cat mechanic and he said there was no need for them. I removed both.
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Old 01-23-2016, 04:46 PM   #11
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The electric backed Accusump is probably the simplest system.

Canton Racing Products

I can't imagine why you'd need a high pressure pump to pre-oil.
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Old 01-23-2016, 04:58 PM   #12
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I have read elsewhere, and I think someone here not too long ago posted that the cheapest preluber was a pressure storage tank that you filled with pressurized oil after the engine started and came up to pressure, shut the valve until prestart the next start.

Not sure how it would work with cold oil or how to plumb it so that it actually works and gets oil to the most critical parts.....

Years ago I had read articles about prelubers and after gaining years of experience decided that for the run of the mill recreational motor owner....not really required.
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Old 01-23-2016, 05:05 PM   #13
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Yea, the pressure tank and solenoid valve system is probably the simplest and most reliable. If one is that motivated to do it.
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Old 01-23-2016, 06:06 PM   #14
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I crank the old FL a little while holding down the stop button. There.... It is pre lubed.
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:43 PM   #15
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I crank the old FL a little while holding down the stop button. There.... It is pre lubed.
Not exactly.
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Old 01-23-2016, 08:45 PM   #16
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I have read elsewhere, and I think someone here not too long ago posted that the cheapest preluber was a pressure storage tank that you filled with pressurized oil after the engine started and came up to pressure, shut the valve until prestart the next start.

That would be an Accusump.
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Old 01-23-2016, 09:26 PM   #17
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I crank the old FL a little while holding down the stop button. There.... It is pre lubed.
After a few seconds of turning the engine over holding the stop button down I note the oil pressure rise according to the oil pressure gauge. Probably not perfect pre lube but better then just starting the engine without using this method.
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Old 01-23-2016, 10:17 PM   #18
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Super simple. A small accumulator tank, one solinoid valve, key switch controlled. Even the folks on trawler forum (caveman) can do it.
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Old 01-24-2016, 12:32 PM   #19
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Not exactly.

Why not Bill?
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Old 01-24-2016, 12:38 PM   #20
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Pre lubing wont get to pistons and cylinders. Getting to cam followers is questionable.


IIRC the Cummins manual recommended spinning with fuel off to get oil pressure up for long storage dry starts.
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