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Old 10-27-2015, 10:14 AM   #41
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I bought a 1979 34 Californian three years ago with twin T6.354mgt's at 185hp. The motors then had, as far as I could tell, about 3000 hours. I bought the boat because I could afford it and it was in reasonable condition. I worried about the motors in part because if their age and also because of what I had read in some of the forums. There is no way I could have afforded rebuilds, let alone a complete re power if this had not gone well. It should be noted that my motors have the conventional exhaust manifolds and not the mani coolers. Three years later I have put just under 600 hours on the boat and am glad to report that all is well. The engines start right up, hardly smoke and I see no reason now that I won't get a lot more life from them. My boat is plumbed for flushing the engines, so after every trip I flush the motors with Salt Away or plain fresh water. I also always run two stroke oil in the fuel at a 200/1 ratio. My maintenance schedule is oil at 100 hours, zincs twice a year, and fuel filters twice a year. This winter I plan on cleaning my intercooler and turbos. As far as upgrading the fuel filters to canisters all I do is use electrical tape to tape the cup to the standard filter. It holds well enough that I can fill it with fuel and install it without having to bleed the system. If The engine rpm's start wandering it is a sign that your Racor is getting plugged! Change it or them then and you will be ok. I recommend that you install a pyrometer if one isn't installed already. I know these motors are "old" technology but their simplicity and ease of working on them are a huge benefit. I routinely run 40-60 miles out of San Diego looking for fish and I have complete faith in my boat and motors.
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Old 10-27-2015, 10:32 AM   #42
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I also always run two stroke oil in the fuel at a 200/1 ratio. My maintenance schedule is oil at 100 hours, zincs twice a year, and fuel filters twice a year. .
Sounds like you are top of things. Two questions:
-Why add oil to fuel?
-Why change fuel filters twice per year?
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Old 10-27-2015, 10:48 AM   #43
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I add the oil as a precaution against the low or no sulphur fuel that we get in California. I read a study comparing additives designed to improve lubricity and the two stroke oil scored very high. For me it is cheap insurance. Not wanting to open a can of worms but I can tell the difference, the motors seem to run better with a smoother exhaust note. Maybe it is my imagination. I change the filters twice a year because I got a load of dirty fuel a while back and I had to change the filter(s) on the fly a few times, not fun in rough seas. I could probably cut back to once a year now, but at 8 dollars a pop for the Racor filters, again it is cheap insurance. By the way SW Diesel in Wilmington, California has any part imaginable for Perkins diesels at pretty reasonable pricing. They are also generous with advice and tips.
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Old 10-27-2015, 10:59 AM   #44
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By the way SW Diesel in Wilmington, California has any part imaginable for Perkins diesels at pretty reasonable pricing. They are also generous with advice and tips.
That is good to know, thanks. They have a counterpart I believe in the Phoenix area.
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:00 AM   #45
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Sunchaser where do you keep your boat?
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:03 AM   #46
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Sunchaser where do you keep your boat?
Sidney, British Columbia
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:19 AM   #47
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Excuse me if this is too far astray from the original thread topic, but:

Has anyone ever put a block heater in one of these engines? If so, which freeze plug did you put it in? Pictures would be awesome.

-Gabe
You should probably start a new thread on this subject
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Old 10-27-2015, 02:16 PM   #48
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What's the best way to do a blowby test on the t6.354?
Also, I have a pyrometer and at WOT for thirty minutes it will approach 900f. At 1800 rpm cruise it's around 450f. Does that seem normal? At WOT I experience stream but have checked all temps with an infra red and everything is normal. I had stream before and after replacing the wet elbow, adding a muffler, replacing impellor, and cleaning out the raw water circuit. There is plenty of raw water flow out the exhaust and I'm not losing coolant. I'm concerned the exhaust manifold may be corroded and leaking into the exhaust since it's raw water cooled, however I would think the exhaust pressure in the manifold is high enough to prevent that.
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Old 10-27-2015, 02:38 PM   #49
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900F should be ok. I have not seen a spec for this engine, but that temp is good for other turbocharged engines in that general size.
NO black smoke is a good thing. That means no or little excess fuel and not building too much heat.
What is your WOT rpm? Should be 2400/2450 (or a little more is ok).

Please do not kid yourself regarding the raw water exhaust manifold. If it leaks externally its a warning sign.
If it leaks internally it can take the engine out in seconds. I know several who have had that happen.
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Old 10-27-2015, 04:36 PM   #50
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Seems crazy there's not even a zinc on that manifold. If I add it to the freshwater circuit should I flush it with acid?
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Old 10-27-2015, 05:54 PM   #51
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Why would you want to flush. Many Perkins do not have zincs. not unusual. Do you have an Owner's manual you can use for service work and checks? Just read about Dude's engine flush travails on another thread. You're not overheating and the EGTs sound OK, what is the issue you are trying to fix?
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Old 10-27-2015, 06:15 PM   #52
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I didn't mean flush the whole circuit, I just meant the exhaust manifold. Seems like there could be a corrosion issue with the salt water. I'll look for the thread you mention.
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Old 10-28-2015, 07:32 AM   #53
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I flushed my exhaust manifold once. Did it while at anchor using the raw water washdown system.
Put on new end pieces, then painted it with regular engine paint, not the high temp stuff. The theory being that when the manifold overheated it would discolor or burn off the paint.
The flushing made a difference in operating temperature. It wasn't overheating prior, but it was cooler afterward.
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Old 10-28-2015, 10:03 AM   #54
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My Perkins are plumbed to be flushed with fresh water after each use. Takes less than ten minutes and it flushes the heat exchanger, the intercooler and exhaust manifold. My components stay cleaner and it extends the life of the cast iron exhaust manifolds. Easy to do, just cut in antee after the main strainer/ through hull and put a ball valve on. The hose is then tied to a hose connection somewhere convenient on the outside of the boat. I have one connector for both engines but open one valve at a time while flushing.
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Old 10-30-2015, 11:07 AM   #55
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Does anyone have the specs for a blow by test or compression test of the T6.354? I have blue smoke and want to rule out the rings and valves.

Thanks,
Robert
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Old 11-08-2015, 03:11 PM   #56
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I'd like to put my exhaust manifold in the fresh water circuit. I've seen a post at the yahoo group with some of the technical details but I don't know if anybody else has done it or if it's a good modification in the long run. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...messages/31029

I'm wondering if a beefier heat exchanger would be needed in the long run, or possibly adding a second smaller universal one to take out the excess heat from the manifold, which I would think is enormous.

Thanks,
Robert
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Old 11-08-2015, 04:03 PM   #57
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Rp,
I made the mod, but it's been quite a few years back, don't remember the details.
Seems like there was some McGyvering involved, nothing that you cant work out between the hardware store and NAPA. I would do a MAJOR cleaning of the exhaust manifold first.
I think the 6-354 comes with cast iron exhaust elbow as well, so it will be in the same condition as the exhaust manifold--ready for a good cleanup.
The heat exchanger on mine was adequate to handle the manifold, even with a big water cooled remote V-drive, and running the crap out of the motor, as the boat was woefully underpowered.
All in all, my Perkins ownership was not a wonderful experience, plagued by problems, finally resolved it all by replacing with a good used Cummins.
I bought the Cummins for the same price as a new Pekins heat exchanger, and have done nothing but change oil ever since!
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Old 11-08-2015, 04:04 PM   #58
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Well, I would have lots of concerns: sufficient coolant flow, too much load on the coolant system, etc. But I read Jay Leonard's Yahoo post that you referenced and at least the water flow turns out ok.

The too much load issue is a serious one. It sounded like he overheated until he increased the size of the main heat exchanger. I wouldn't do it unless I also did that.

And if you decide to do it, take IR gun measurements all over the engine block at wot before, so you can compare it to after. You are robbing some of the coolant flow to satisfy the parallel path through the manifold and that may be marginal for cooling even with the bigger heat exchanger. If you see any spots with temps 5 degrees higher than before, watch out. You may be boiling coolant in a particular area and when you do the steam will block the flow and then .....

The best way would be to increase the coolant pump capacity and the raw water pump capacity as well. Then you are essentially redesigning the entire cooling system.

Thinking this through a little more, Jay increased the port on the coolant pump from 1/2" to 3/4". I am not sure I would do that. Increasing the size just means less for the main block and head. I wonder if 1/2" with 3/4" hose wouldn't allow enough coolant flow to keep the manifold at reasonable temps. Again before and after IR shots will tell the story.

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Old 11-08-2015, 05:33 PM   #59
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Sounds like too much to justify it. What about a generic SS heat exchanger and a separate freshwater circuit for the exhaust manifold? Would SS hold up to hot saltwater? I can get a generic electric hot water pump used in automotive heater systems.

Could I just add a zinc to the manifold?
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Old 11-08-2015, 05:54 PM   #60
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Sounds like too much to justify it. What about a generic SS heat exchanger and a separate freshwater circuit for the exhaust manifold? Would SS hold up to hot saltwater? I can get a generic electric hot water pump used in automotive heater systems.

Could I just add a zinc to the manifold?
That sounds worse. Where are your going to pick up suction for your new fresh water circulating pump? Anyplace you do this you will be robbing flow from the main block. And where will you return the flow to? Sounds like all you are doing is paralleling the main pump.

That generic pump won't be anywhere near as reliable as the main loop and you won't have anyway of knowing if it is ok until it fails.

You can add a zinc but it may not do much good on the other end of the manifold.

David
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