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Old 12-06-2015, 11:21 AM   #121
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Size of engine room is important but so is layout of ER and Lazerette or work area. There is a television show "Selling Yachts" and a couple was looking. The man was rather tall. Great work area forward of the engine room with table, drawers, all you'd dream of. Just the ceiling was 4" lower than his height. That to me is far worse than being a few inches short at the engines. He bought the boat. I'd sure like to know how that turned out. I've seen ER's that looked packed but no wasted space and everything was fully accessible. Things like the watermaker on a shelf over other items, a standard factory arrangement.
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Old 12-06-2015, 11:54 AM   #122
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Art: Are those gassers? extraordinary mileage if they are.
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Old 12-06-2015, 11:57 AM   #123
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Inline diesels generally give better access to the outsides of the engines than V8s. But a lot depends on how far apartthe engines are and where the tanks are located.


Inline also often only have one exhaust system
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Old 12-06-2015, 01:43 PM   #124
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Art: Are those gassers? extraordinary mileage if they are.
Yup! Not really extraordinary mileage. Top condition engines - 350 cid / 255 hp each. Very clean bottom, correct props, little over half load aboard.

With one engine only running at low rpm and moving boat through water at just 5 to 5.5 knts... in calm water, with other prop left freewheeling (BTW - BW VD tranys allow that).. 2.75 to 3 nmpg is attained. With twins running at low rpm for 6 knots 2 nmpg becomes avg. 7.58 knts is our Tolly's calced hull speed (at 7 or just above speed running twins we get only 1.5 nmpg) For full plane at 16 to 17 knts Tolly averages 1 nmpg.

Well designed planing hull, good condition gassers, clean bottom, correct props, and not too much carry-on load = OK mileage in the water. Being able to plane out at 16/17 knts or above speeds when desired or needed can be priceless. That is speed we travel when long distance needs to be accomplished from dawn to dusk.

One time I needed to run quickly away from oncoming and potentially horrific multiple boat traffic problems. WOT at 21/22 knts really helped out... only needed that speed for a short duration... minutes.
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Old 12-06-2015, 02:28 PM   #125
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how much does the boat weigh??
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Old 12-06-2015, 02:51 PM   #126
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how much does the boat weigh??
34' LOA / 32' +/- LWL / 17K lbs. - dry
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Old 12-06-2015, 03:05 PM   #127
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Wifey B: Well, I can top you guys....we use less than 1 gallon of gas an hour at cruise.
Wifey B: Confession time for anyone who didn't get it. Notice I said less than a gallon of GAS. True as we use diesel and so don't take any gas.
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Old 12-06-2015, 08:36 PM   #128
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Well, if I were bragging, I would point out that Semper Fi has an integral 500 gallon fiberglass fuel tank built into the hull that gives her an easy 1300 mile range with reserves. We traveled from Jacksonville, FL to Kentucky Lake this summer with a bit less (25-30 gallons) than a full tank on departure. We topped off with 243 gallons in Apalachicola, FL and came the rest of the way without adding any additional fuel.
Now thats a great Cruise!
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Old 12-06-2015, 09:08 PM   #129
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I think a stand up full access engine room is great,,,in a ship. Certainly not in our boat sizes. Tremendous waste of space IMO.
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Old 12-06-2015, 09:26 PM   #130
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I think a stand up full access engine room is great,,,in a ship. Certainly not in our boat sizes. Tremendous waste of space IMO.
I've been in quite a few Great Harbour N-series boats, and if I ever saw a boat that hasn't suffered from wasted space, the N-series is it. In addition to a cavernous engine room, it has a cavernous bosons locker (storage) right next to it, and a cavernous lazzarette next to that. If you opened the stern, I could probably dock my famously bulbous Krogen Manatee into it without touching anywhere, even though the GH is only a foot longer. The fact that the engine room is cavernous is just another element you tend to find in a boat that was built to be a cavern.
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Old 12-10-2015, 12:58 PM   #131
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Wow, you guys have some nice engine rooms - it's this kind of envy that gets me into trouble. Last night I was considering laying down some indoor-outdoor carpeting along the sides of my single Perk but then thought I'd be ridiculed for having carpet in my engine room.

But art? That exudes the kind of confidence that says "I don't need spare parts or tools onboard"

Technology helps in some tight areas, like having a cheap pencil camera on a telescopic pole. I might invent a roomba like thing that roams the bilge and keeps it clean and dry.

My raw water pump is a bitch to get to, since there are hose-clamp tails that love to scratch my arms. I would like to replace the mechanical fuel, raw water and fresh water pumps with electric ones that are mounted on a bulkhead, but I don't know if the reliability is good enough.

Seems like the engine designers keep everything compact. But on a boat I think the rules are little different. Take the heat exchanger and oil cooler off the engine and put em on a bulkhead. Easy access plus it's more obvious to see problems. Seems like that would do wonders for engine life.
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Old 12-10-2015, 02:31 PM   #132
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Wow, you guys have some nice engine rooms - it's this kind of envy that gets me into trouble. Last night I was considering laying down some indoor-outdoor carpeting along the sides of my single Perk but then thought I'd be ridiculed for having carpet in my engine room.

But art? That exudes the kind of confidence that says "I don't need spare parts or tools onboard"

Technology helps in some tight areas, like having a cheap pencil camera on a telescopic pole. I might invent a roomba like thing that roams the bilge and keeps it clean and dry.

My raw water pump is a bitch to get to, since there are hose-clamp tails that love to scratch my arms. I would like to replace the mechanical fuel, raw water and fresh water pumps with electric ones that are mounted on a bulkhead, but I don't know if the reliability is good enough.

Seems like the engine designers keep everything compact. But on a boat I think the rules are little different. Take the heat exchanger and oil cooler off the engine and put em on a bulkhead. Easy access plus it's more obvious to see problems. Seems like that would do wonders for engine life.
I think the thing to keep in mind is that the engines are not designed for specific boats, so they then do what they can to adapt them to the many different hulls and usages. A little of this, a little of that. Not a lot of volume on specific installations. Then often it's a conclusion that something has to be less than ideal so what will that be.
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Old 12-20-2015, 11:15 AM   #133
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Engine room was a prerequisite when we were boat shopping. It was surprising how many boats, including some that are very popular, were ruled out because of that prerequisite. Happy with the space offered by the Halvorsen.
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:36 PM   #134
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IMO, organization of the ER is more important than stand up headroom.
What I want is easy access to oil and fuel filters, oil and belt changes, fluids checks, bilge pump, raw water strainer and impeller.
Most of this is bend over work anyway, and the deck is a great place to stretch out your back and legs when you're done.

RP, you can get little rubber thimbles that cover the exposed ends of those pesky hose clamps nicely, check with your local hydraulic hose store.
I bought a big bagfull, as my skin tears easily, and my nice white engine room looks pretty gross when spattered with blood!
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:58 PM   #135
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Once at my marina an owner of a Canoe Cove asked me if I could help him start his starboard engine. He was fairly round (rounder than me at the time) but his port engine lived under his bunk and the starboard one lived under a closet where he had to pull out all the clothing and remove the floorboard; then, with a flashlight you could see the Cat engine lurking down there with the batteries etc., sitting on its v-drive. I refused. Enough to give you nightmares.
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Old 12-23-2015, 01:19 PM   #136
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Yet another reason why single engine boats are vastly superior to twins in the <50' category. While I can't stand up in my engine room, there are nice 24" wide walk (crawl) ways down each side of the engine and generator. Remaining engine room equipment is out board of the walk ways.

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Agreed on the single engine access. It's too bad that they never made a left / right configuration for a twin engine boat and have the serviceable components ( pumps, filters, alt. etc. on the inside. ) In my case ( Kha Shing 40 @ Twin Cummins ) I have by boat standards a decent engine room but one engine is almost non - serviceable. Frank B.
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Old 12-23-2015, 02:34 PM   #137
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Detroit did, back in the days of the inline 53 and 71 series. EVERYTHING could be had on the centerline. Exhaust was usually outboard.
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Old 12-23-2015, 04:06 PM   #138
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I agree...stand up engine room is OK to walk around and say how pretty it is...but ultimately it is where you need to get in it and how high/low the component is makes the difference.


Mine might be a crawl in....but if necessary the floor comes up to give stand up room...but you still need to lay down to get to most systems and engine components so standing headroom is just a waste of space 99.9 percent of the year.


It really depends on a lot...from what you really do down there to just ego....


Except for a few models...that standing head room may come at a price of a much bigger bat than you need, can afford, can maintain....etc....


If none of those matter...well then I AM jealous and would love a 60 something with standing head room in the ER.....


But I'll have to wait to see what Santa brings.
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Old 12-23-2015, 08:37 PM   #139
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I just found this thread. LMAO!!! capn George - I'd say I'm about 75% qualified + bonus points for having a few odds and ends of broken parts. Yeah, it's getting harder, and it's also getting harder to find skilled hands to do the stuff I can't competently do myself due to access - they're getting old, too. But, all in all mostly workable - I just do not go outboard of the engines or forward of the genset.

I'm not a live aboard or an extensive cruiser. I believe my interest and criteria regarding ER clearance and layout would increase exponentially were I to become one. The ER would definitely contain a single engine and at least 60" headroom. I'm 6'2" and have helped a friend in his 60" ER - worked fine.

Boydski! You've killed it! I keep a pretty clean ER - uh, but it's not decorated. Or, coordinated, spacious, clinically clean, etc, etc. But then, the coup de grace, framed Vargas on the bulkheads. I'm overwhelmed and sick to my stomach with envy. Beautiful!
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Old 12-26-2015, 07:16 PM   #140
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I was impressed by the room around the engine in the little Camano. As you suggest the Down East boats with engine boxes are also a good option.

I am an official old fat guy.

RTF, that's just creepy. I saw a local production of Spam A Lot last Saturday, very funny!
Yep, the Camano is pretty accessible. Regardless, the older you get, the more work you're going to have to farm out.

I don't think I would let a cramped engine space make me not consider an otherwise "perfect" boat for me and my family. Every boat is a compromise and that larger engine room space has to come out of somewhere.
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