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Old 10-29-2013, 09:22 PM   #1
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Moving Genset, fuel line

I finished a new hatch in my veranda and it's time to start the plan to move the genset from under the galley to its new position. The fuel lines from the filters are all metallic, but the boat is from '87. These days, are we still using metal for runs from the tank, or is there some super durable fuel-only hose for a 15 - 20 ft. run from the tank? Thanks in advance for responses.
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:46 PM   #2
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I think most of the diesel suitable fuel lines (non-metallic) will easily last 10-15 years unless there is chafe or other damage.

Not sure "super durable" is all that necessary....but I will admit..both my 37 sport fish and this trawler had copper (properly installed) and it was as good as new after 20+ years...I redid my sportfish in copper when I switched filter systems...it was very easy....this time I went with generic hose from defender because the runs were short, in sight and needed a lot of turns in the short length.
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Old 10-30-2013, 07:39 AM   #3
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One factor to consider is how good you are with a flaring tool and your ability to sweat copper pipe. While durable, copper tubing may need to be repaired and if you are unable to do so you may be out of luck until you can find a plumber. For that reason alone I used the new fuel hose when I redid my fuel tanks. Easy to repair, easy to replace.

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Old 10-30-2013, 01:09 PM   #4
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For copper fuel lines...no sweating necessary that I have found...most fittings are reusable and all you add is the new tubing.

I had really never used a flaring tool before...first and last try way successful and never leaked. Single flares on reasonably large diameter tubing is really pretty easy...no reason to be afraid to try.

The hardest part is deciding how many bends you want before breaking down and cutting and just using a connector.

I know long flare nuts are suggested for propane systems...and they are long on my steering lines...not sure if they are recommended for diesel systems aboard.
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Old 10-30-2013, 01:39 PM   #5
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Copper line, sweating fittings, etc. is pretty old hat for me. I figured that new boat construction regs might have a new standard since the last time I had to install new fuel lines. Thanks.
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Old 10-30-2013, 01:50 PM   #6
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Nope...copper is fine..maybe better if they keep fiddling with additives and biofuels....again...bend, cut and flare....pretty simple...no sweating required unless you need to "make" a fitting.
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Old 10-30-2013, 06:49 PM   #7
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"I think most of the diesel suitable fuel lines (non-metallic) will easily last 10-15 years unless there is chafe or other damage. "

I wouldn't use anything that has such a short horizon as 10 - 15 years for a "permanent" installation. Who needs that short a built in obsolescence. Go for the copper. after 33 years my copper fuel lines look like they have only another 50 - 100 years left in them.
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