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Old 04-18-2013, 06:15 AM   #41
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What you are seeing in this photo is typical "jimmy"- "Blue" smoke.

Jimmys with N series injectors seldom smoke.

With H or HC injectors will smoke at light loads , most of the time!
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Old 04-18-2013, 06:53 AM   #42
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But what is the comment regarding "Unattractive sights"?
The presence of a cruise ship.

Marin isn't far off with regard to the clear cutting scars. That was a shameful bit of SE history. Selling raw logs for export for less than the taxpayer paid to build the roads to haul them out makes the "bridge to nowhere" look like petty larceny.
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:45 AM   #43
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I really have to go and have a look at that part of the world, I just love these threads that tend to morph into tales of the Pacific North West.
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Old 04-18-2013, 09:52 AM   #44
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Speaking of Alaska, I knew many people who would purposely add some gasoline to their diesel fuel in the winter to improve combustion, not much, maybe 1%
Adding gasoline to diesel fuel for whatever reason is one of the "101 Stupid Boating Tricks" that show up on boating forums from time to time.
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:31 AM   #45
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....the dreaded cylinder wall glazing...
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:34 AM   #46
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Just something I picked up on another forum.

"White smoke indicates either water vapor from dirty fuel, a water leak into
the cylinder or atomized, but completely unburned, fuel. Air in the fuel can
also cause white smoke."

It being both engines I would say water. Next stop, fuel up and add Sea Foam. Good Luck!
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Old 04-18-2013, 01:46 PM   #47
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Added two bottles of Lucas to 130 gallons or so and now almost no smoke at all :-)
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Old 04-18-2013, 02:32 PM   #48
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Winter diesel fuel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Blending
In Northern America gas stations offer two types of diesel fuel - according to ASTM D975[5] these are named No.1 and No.2 fuel. No.1 fuel (kerosene) has a natural CFPP of -40 C but it is more expensive than No.2 fuel. Adding No.1 fuel will lower the CFPP of No.2 fuel - adding 10% will lower the CFPP temperature by about 5 degrees.[6]
For some diesel motors it is also possible to add even lighter fuels like gasoline to extend the CFPP characteristics. Some car makers were recommending adding up to 20% gasoline to permit operation in cold weather (at the price of higher consumption) and it had been common practice in Europe where No.1 fuel is not offered at gas stations. Since the 1990s car makers began selling only direct injection diesel engines - these will not withstand any gasoline portions in the fuel as the high pressure in the injection device will ignite the gasoline early on possibly destroying the injectors.
Car makers selling Common Rail or Unit Injector diesel engines prohibit the blending of diesel fuel with either gasoline or kerosene as it may destroy the injection device.[4][7]
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:19 PM   #49
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Found this:



Diesel Smoke tells YOU a Story

Basically, smoke from a diesel engine indicates that something is not right. It should be taken as an indication that there is a problem existing (or developing), that will potentially shorten the engine life, or result in unnecessary costs. It should be regarded as an opportunity to take measures that will save you money in both the long term and also the short term. At the least, that smoke may be due to a simple problem, that is causing poor combustion efficiency, and costing you in excessive fuel bills (eg carboned up engine from excessive idling, stop start operation or short run times). At the other end of the scale, it may be your last chance to act, before a catastrophic engine failure occurs (eg piston seizure, valve or turbocharger failure).

A diesel engine in good condition should produce no visible smoke from the exhaust, under most operating conditions. A short puff of smoke when an engine is accelerated under load may be acceptable, due to the lag before the turbocharger speed and air flow is able to match the volume of diesel injected into the cylinders. That would only apply to older technology diesel engines, but with modern type diesels, no smoke at all should be evident.

There are three basic types of smoke, as identifiable by their colour.

Black smoke is the most common smoke emitted from diesel engines. It indicates poor and incomplete combustion of the diesel fuel. There are many causes, including

  • Incorrect timing
  • Dirty or worn injectors
  • Over-fuelling
  • Faulty turbocharger (ie not enough air to match the fuel)
  • Incorrect valve clearanceIncorrect air/fuel ratio
  • Low cylinder compression (eg sticking piston rings or worn components)
  • Dirty air cleaner
  • Restricted induction system (eg system too small or kinked inlet piping)
  • Other engine tune factors
  • Poor quality fuel
  • Excessive carbon build up in combustion and exhaust spaces
  • Cool operating temperatures
Obviously, worn or damaged components must be replaced, and the earlier you identify and fix the problem, the less damage will be done. Keep on top of engine tune issues, including valve adjustments, and regular servicing of air, fuel and oil filters. Do not buy fuel from suspect outlets. Dirty components, such as injectors can be easily restored to full cleanliness by using an effective and reliable fuel system cleaner.


Cleaning of internals of engines has usually only been possible at overhaul, however, Cost Effective Maintenance provide two products to enable vehicle and equipment owners to quickly, safely and cheaply restore full cleanliness to combustion and exhaust spaces (FTC Decarbonizer) as well as piston rings, oil pumps, oil galleries, oil coolers, piston skirts, valve gear, etc (Flushing Oil Concentrate).

Black smoke is high in carbon or soot, which is an undesirable product of diesel combustion. Now, the combustion of diesel is a complicated process of breaking down the various hydrocarbon fuel molecules into progressively smaller and smaller molecules, by burning in the presence of oxygen. The main and ideal end products of combustion are CO2 and H2O (carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas and water). It is believed that the last step in the process is carbon monoxide (the poisonous gas) to carbon dioxide. This is also the slowest step by far, and when combustion conditions deteriorate some upstream bottle necking occurs in the chain of combustion reactions. This results (according to some authorities) in polymerization of smaller partly burnt molecules into much larger ones, which become visible as soot, or black smoke.



Blue smoke is an indication of oil being burnt. The oil can enter the combustion chamber for several reasons.
  • Worn valve guides or seals
  • Wear in power assemblies (ie cylinders, piston rings, ring grooves)
  • Cylinder glaze
  • Piston ring sticking
  • Incorrect grade of oil (eg oil too thin, and migrating past the rings)
  • Fuel dilution in the oil (oil thinned out with diesel)
At cold start, blue smoke is often evident, and can reflect reduced oil control, due to fouling deposits around piston rings or cylinder glaze (which is actually carbon deposited in the machined cylinder crosshatching. These tiny grooves actually hold a film of oil, which in turn completes the seal between the combustion chamber and the oil wetted crankcase). Blue smoke should not be evident at any time, but it is worth noting, that engines with good sound compression can actually burn quite a lot of oil without evidence of blue smoke. Good compression allows oil to burn cleanly, as part of the fuel. It is not good though!


Once again, restore physical cleanliness to all components. Replace worn parts where necessary. In some situations, where the engines are pretty worn, but you just need to keep them in service, cleaning with the previously mentioned products, followed by effective additional anti-wear protection, will reduce internal stresses on all those tired components, providing extended service life.


White smoke occurs when raw diesel comes through the exhaust completely intact and unburned. Some causes of this include
  • Faulty or damaged injectors
  • Incorrect injection timing (could be a worn timing gear or damaged crankshaft keyway).
  • Low cylinder compression (eg caused by leaking or broken valves, piston ring sticking, cylinder and/or ring wear, or cylinder glaze)
When white smoke occurs at cold start, and then disappears as the engine warms up, the most common causes are fouling deposits around piston rings and/or cylinder glazing.


Water entering combustion spaces will also create white smoke. Faulty head gaskets and cracked cylinder heads or blocks are a common cause of water entry, and are often to blame.

Unfortunately, expensive mechanical repair is the only proper solution here.
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Old 04-19-2013, 01:21 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskan Sea-Duction View Post
Found this:

When white smoke occurs at cold start, and then disappears as the engine warms up, the most common causes are fouling deposits around piston rings and/or cylinder glazing.


Water entering combustion spaces will also create white smoke. Faulty head gaskets and cracked cylinder heads or blocks are a common cause of water entry, and are often to blame.

Unfortunately, expensive mechanical repair is the only proper solution here.
Good post. Water in fuel (white smoke if getting past fuel filters) can also harm injectors with all sorts of resulting issues.
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Old 04-19-2013, 01:22 PM   #51
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Since he did not have this problem until he took on fuel, and it affects two separate engines, my suspicion is that it is fuel related and will go away as this load of fuel is used up.

It's unlikely that any of the mechanical problems mentioned above or in other responses happened coincidentally to both engines at the same time.
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Old 04-19-2013, 02:13 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Since the 1990s car makers began selling only direct injection diesel engines - these will not withstand any gasoline portions in the fuel as the high pressure in the injection device will ignite the gasoline early on possibly destroying the injectors.
Not quite accurate. Direct injection engines tend to have lower CR than indirect injection engines, but a higher injection pressure due to the nozzle type required for direct injection. A direct injector uses small holes to atomize and evenly (as possible) distribute fuel in the combustion chamber and this requires high pressure to achieve consistent atomization.

An indirect injector normally uses a pintle or valve type injector that squirts a coarser mist into the pre-combustion space at a lower pressure.

In the case of the direct injector, fuel is an important cooling medium for the nozzle and gasoline will carbonize and create wear and clogging problems but ignition is scarcely a consideration as it is slower to ignite than diesel in the combustion chamber.

Gasoline contaminated fuel has lower lubricity as well as a tendency to carbonize or create other damaging deposits so it is definitely a no no to mix in diesel in modern extremely high pressure injection systems as are used in common rail applications.
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Old 06-10-2013, 12:30 PM   #53
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Less then 15 gallons in the tank and I took on 240g a few days and 400 miles ago. Plenty of smoke. I switched to the second filter a few days ago and today when I looked at the bowl of the one I shut down it had turned a very pronounced green. Like swamp green! I would say I have an algae problem? And water? Is their a good quick way to test for water? How best to kill the algae?
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Old 06-10-2013, 03:58 PM   #54
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Is their a good quick way to test for water?

Yes they sell a cream that can be rubbed on the side of a hose or a tank stick , that changes color with water.

If you can stick the tank and find water , pumping it out is required.

No water , no bugs.

But there are at least a dozen poisons for killing a tank full of bugs at any marina..
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Old 06-10-2013, 04:38 PM   #55
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[QUOTE=FF;162024]Is their a good quick way to test for water?

Yes they sell a cream that can be rubbed on the side of a hose or a tank stick , that changes color with water...QUOTE]

It's called water finding paste and any home heating oil company should have it. I'm not sure how much it will help though unless your fill spout is right over the outlet of your fuel tanks. You have to have a measurable water/fuel interface for it to work.

If you have run that far with that fuel, keep switching filters and I'd get home.
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Old 06-10-2013, 11:13 PM   #56
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It's Maine for the summer then Deltaville for the winter.
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Old 06-18-2013, 12:48 PM   #57
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Quote:
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Less then 15 gallons in the tank and I took on 240g a few days and 400 miles ago. Plenty of smoke. I switched to the second filter a few days ago and today when I looked at the bowl of the one I shut down it had turned a very pronounced green. Like swamp green! I would say I have an algae problem? And water? Is their a good quick way to test for water? How best to kill the algae?
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