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Old 08-14-2018, 07:21 PM   #1
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Monograde Engine Oils

The manual for my older Yanmar recommends, for my temperatures, mono grade SEA 20 oil. This is hard to find at least for me in remote Alaska. I have been using Delo 400 15-30. I fine lots of conflicting info on the web concerning this but what do you think? Is it worth seeking out a mono grade oil? I know Delo 400 makes a monograde SEA 20 oil but I have not located a source.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:45 PM   #2
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It's hard to argue against the folks who designed and built the motor. I'd try and use what they recommend.

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Old 08-14-2018, 08:09 PM   #3
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How old is your engine? Mine is 40+ (not a Yanmar in any way) and the recommendation from the manual is SAE 10, 20 or 30 depending of temperature or 15w40.

L
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Old 08-14-2018, 08:35 PM   #4
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Are you sure it only recommends SAE 20? My Perkins, Kubota, and Westerbeke manuals recommend SAE 20 OR 10W30. Nothing wrong with 10W30 changed at normal recommended intervals, especially in cold climates.
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Old 08-14-2018, 09:13 PM   #5
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This is the oversimplified, short story.

Engines with no oil pumps and no oil filters used straight weight, non-detergent oil. When pumps were used, multi-grade oil made cavitation less likely. When filters were used, detergents kept impurities floating long enough to trap them in the filter. Engine protection was based on viscosity until additives and synthetics offered other protections.
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Old 08-14-2018, 11:03 PM   #6
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Lou, if 15-40 is a mfr. approved oil, why not use it. Lots of engines do, and it`s readily available.
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Old 08-14-2018, 11:05 PM   #7
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Lou, if 15-40 is a mfr. approved oil, why not use it. Lots of engines do, and it`s readily available.
Well sae 30 is mentioned as first choice for my climate and I have easy access to it so the choice.

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Old 08-15-2018, 05:44 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boat View Post
This is the oversimplified, short story.

Engines with no oil pumps and no oil filters used straight weight, non-detergent oil. When pumps were used, multi-grade oil made cavitation less likely. When filters were used, detergents kept impurities floating long enough to trap them in the filter. Engine protection was based on viscosity until additives and synthetics offered other protections.



My Lehman manual recommends straight wt. oil, it has a pump and a filter.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:04 AM   #9
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When you find the correct oil to the engine mfg. specks . simply purchase enough for a number of oil changes.

The engine builder knows what is required .

Single weight oil comes in many detergent grades ( CC, CD ,CF etc) the engine builder knows best what is required.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:09 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boat View Post
This is the oversimplified, short story.

Engines with no oil pumps and no oil filters used straight weight, non-detergent oil. When pumps were used, multi-grade oil made cavitation less likely. When filters were used, detergents kept impurities floating long enough to trap them in the filter. Engine protection was based on viscosity until additives and synthetics offered other protections.

The only engines I've seen without a pump and/or filter are on lawn mowers and small portable generators. Basically engines under about 10hp.


Also, the issues is not whether multi weight is required, but rather would it be detrimental in any way.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:15 AM   #11
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Engine manufacturers knew best from amongst the available choices at the time. They had no crystal ball with which to gaze forward to the new oils and additives now available.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:24 AM   #12
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The question earlier about the engine's age is an important one. Oils have evolved quite a bit over the decades, and each new oil standard (API rating) is backwards compatible with previous standards. So in general, a modern 10W-30 oil is a suitable replacement for any straight weight oil from 10W to 30W. There are exceptions, but they are just that - exceptions.


And related to this, I have to wonder.... We get all worked up over what type of oil to use. Brand, weight, multi vs straight, etc. It's as bad as filter micron ratings and anchors. So I have to ask. Has anyone, at any time in their life, of the dozens and dozens of motors we have all owned over the years in various vehicles and machines, ever had one fail because they used incompatible oil?


Personally, I have never had a failure, or even heard of a failure that traces back to the wrong oil selection. And strictly my opinion - I think fretting over oil selection is one of the biggest non-issues in the world of engines. I think any reputable brand meeting an industry specification called for in your manual, or backwards compatible with your manual, is just fine. Then start the engine, and use it.
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Old 08-15-2018, 08:55 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
The question earlier about the engine's age is an important one. Oils have evolved quite a bit over the decades, and each new oil standard (API rating) is backwards compatible with previous standards. So in general, a modern 10W-30 oil is a suitable replacement for any straight weight oil from 10W to 30W. There are exceptions, but they are just that - exceptions.


And related to this, I have to wonder.... We get all worked up over what type of oil to use. Brand, weight, multi vs straight, etc. It's as bad as filter micron ratings and anchors. So I have to ask. Has anyone, at any time in their life, of the dozens and dozens of motors we have all owned over the years in various vehicles and machines, ever had one fail because they used incompatible oil?


Personally, I have never had a failure, or even heard of a failure that traces back to the wrong oil selection. And strictly my opinion - I think fretting over oil selection is one of the biggest non-issues in the world of engines. I think any reputable brand meeting an industry specification called for in your manual, or backwards compatible with your manual, is just fine. Then start the engine, and use it.
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Old 08-15-2018, 09:24 AM   #14
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The oil ratings as defined by the standards organizations are usually more about emissions requirements for on-road vehicles than about lubrication requirements for engines.

Some big truck diesels come with warranty coverage for one million miles. You know the oil is adequate for engine protection.

At 50mph would be twenty thousand hours.

It is fun that people get passionate about motor oil and anchors.
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Old 08-15-2018, 09:25 AM   #15
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I would use 15W40 assuming you have a diesel engine. That is the grade that almost all the local fishermen use in their diesels. Texaco URSA, Chevron Delo 400 and Shell Rotella T are all good choices. 10W30 and 10W40 are generally gas grades and not really appropriate for a diesel.
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Old 08-15-2018, 09:40 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by what_barnacles View Post
My Lehman manual recommends straight wt. oil, it has a pump and a filter.
This oil pump is probably not prone to cavitation in the specified range for operating temperatures.

Detergent oil probably is specified.

Who knows? The specification may have been written so as to promote a certain company's brand of oil.

I'd send in an oil sample to see what the lab says. They can tell how the oil is performing and also give you an idea of your engine's condition. It's cheap and you get some peace of mind also.

My guess is that the oil you have been using is far more than adequate.
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Old 08-15-2018, 12:16 PM   #17
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The only motors I know of with really specific oil requirements are the old Detroit Diesels that need a specific ash content as well as the correct grade. Delo 100 is good, but Delo 400 is not. Some Rotellas are good, some not depending upon date of mfg. Fleetguard is good, but only one specific part number.

I have 12V71TI’s and I just buy my oil in 5gal pails from DDA directly, ditto with coolant. It ends up costing a tiny bit more, but I know it’s the right stuff that way and the difference is really a small price to pay for peace of mind.
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Old 08-15-2018, 01:02 PM   #18
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Just a little more info. My engine is 1981 or so, Yanmar 3HM. Designed as a raw water cooled engine though originally installed with keel cooling. It runs at 140-150 F. I hadn't thought about this before but at that temp the oil is also at that temp so the multi grade oil is not being used to its full range. Whatever that means.
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Old 08-15-2018, 06:17 PM   #19
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I would use 15W40 assuming you have a diesel engine. That is the grade that almost all the local fishermen use in their diesels. Texaco URSA, Chevron Delo 400 and Shell Rotella T are all good choices. 10W30 and 10W40 are generally gas grades and not really appropriate for a diesel.

The difference between oil for a gas engine vs diesel is also in the rating, and is irrespective of weight. Sxxx oils are for gas engines, and Cxxx oils are for diesels. From there you pick whatever weight you want.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:05 PM   #20
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Just a little more info. My engine is 1981 or so, Yanmar 3HM. Designed as a raw water cooled engine though originally installed with keel cooling. It runs at 140-150 F. I hadn't thought about this before but at that temp the oil is also at that temp so the multi grade oil is not being used to its full range. Whatever that means.
The problem is that during cold startup, the engine is not at those temperatures, the oil is thick and does not adequately flow so more wear occurs. Being in Alaska does not help.

Be sure what you buy is specified for compression ignition "C" ie diesels; rated CH-4 or higher. "S" type rated oils are for Spark ignition ie gasoline engines.
Read more here:


https://www.api.org/products-and-ser...l-c-categories


https://www.api.org/products-and-ser...oil-categories
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