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Old 03-26-2013, 06:24 PM   #21
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This is an interesting thread and something I think of often. My pickup has 5,101 hours on the motor at 140,000 miles and 6 years old. Unheard of in a maranized car engine. I compare that to my thirty year old Perkins with 2,500 hours. They seem barely broken in, hourwise.
Regarding outboards, I don't think I've seen one advertised with over 700 hours, so got me to wondering what is the typical life span, hour-wise of an outboard?
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:05 PM   #22
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This is an interesting thread and something I think of often. My pickup has 5,101 hours on the motor at 140,000 miles and 6 years old. Unheard of in a maranized car engine. I compare that to my thirty year old Perkins with 2,500 hours. They seem barely broken in, hourwise.
Regarding outboards, I don't think I've seen one advertised with over 700 hours, so got me to wondering what is the typical life span, hour-wise of an outboard?
Not sure where you got your info or if you have read most of this thread...but marinized car engines have gone 5000+ hours in some boats and outboards also have easily surpassed 1000 hours.

Talk to commercial guys and don't nuch you read in boating magazines.

Well at least try national Fisherman mag instead of the glossy yacht mags...
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Old 03-27-2013, 07:15 AM   #23
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Well at least try national Fisherman mag instead of the glossy yacht mags...

The guys in NF have a great setup , usually a roof hatch that will allow the engine to be removed straight up in minuets.

With the usual keel cooling and dry exhaust the hookups are minor.

Most will have a spare junk yard engine , so IF something untoward happens , its no big deal.

Remember many of these folks will run home loaded at full tilt , so the engine does get a workout!
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Old 03-27-2013, 09:26 AM   #24
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In the 1960s Seamaster marinized the Ford 534 truck engine. This was a high torque relatively slow turning gasser. I believe that the top RPM was about 2800. Hatteras used some of these in their early sportfishers. I knew a guy who had the SeaBee, a 41 Hatteras. He said they were bullet proof. Not economical to run however.

In the late 50s we had a couple of GMC straight trucks with 20' boxes. They had the V-6 engines Eric was talking about. They were good trucks, and a big improvement over the old GM straight 6. Maybe it was just that they were newer. I don't remember about the fuel mileage. I wasn't paying for it. We also got our first International COE tractors at that time. They had the 220 hp Cummins. I will never forget the beautiful sound they made. After the screaming Jimmys they were a pleasure to drive. The Road Ranger transmission was also a big improvement.
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Old 03-27-2013, 09:55 AM   #25
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This is an area that I've got unfortunately quite a bit of experience in.

First, Gas engines are generally found in planing hull boats.

The owners of these boats generally run them hard, up on plane.

What I've found over many years on both my own boats and watching the Bayliner Owners Club members trials and tribulations is that a gas engine is going to last approx 1,000 hours over a 10-15 year useful lifespan.

Thats not to say some last longer, and thats not to say that some last shorter, thats just what I've found.

This is also what David Pascoe found and documented in his writings on the subject of Gas Vs Diesel

Marine Engines : Power Options - Gas Versus Diesel

Now, down to the root cause of the failures. Do gas engines fail because of an internal problem, or do they fail because of an external problem.

I think its both.

Running an engine hard, like a boat up on plane makes everything critical. There is so much heat to dissipate that the smallest cooling system issue can lead to catastrophic engine failure. Timing issues or old gas can cause detonation which can ruin a gas engine extremely quickly.

Then you run into maintenance issues. Gas engines are often not maintained properly, with the largest issue being exhaust system corrosion and failure. Then you run into the issue of water ingestion. Stern drive installations do not use water lift mufflers, and the installation is often marginal at best when considering exhaust system rise. This makes water ingestion a major problem.

So, the long story is that in boats gas engines do not generally (but not always) have long lifespans, but its not really the engines fault.

A well maintained gas engine in a larger boat might last a very long time.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:37 AM   #26
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Looks to me at this point that gas engines suffer terribly from all manner of abuse. And most die off quickly.

What I wonder is what if someone ran a gas engine the way lots or even most of us run our diesels. From the text I'm hear'in on this forum most trawler engines lead a life that almost all gas engines can hardly dream about. And keep in mind that gas engines don't suffer from underloading. It seems to me that If I was to swap out my diesel for an excellent gas engine it should last at least half as long as the diesel.

Still looking for a fleet car or truck story but even that would be flawed by the fact that the engines would be operated by people that didn't own the engine. They'd run them hard cold and shut them down hot and do lots of other things not good for engines. But if fleet gas engines ran regularly 5000 hrs then one could assume one could get at least 8000 hrs if run and maintained well.

Max does your PU actually have an hourmeter? Did you install it? Sounds like you must have done a lot if idling.
I remember something thats kinda related to this. In th 50s and 60s Weyerhaeuser kept their OBs (50hp Mercury 4 cyl) for pond boats. They were run hard every day. Lots and lots of full throttle operation. The throttles probably performed much like an on/off valve. They rebuilt those engines often but because of the nature of the crankshaft it was probably not replaced. Interesting extreme performance of an OB.
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Old 03-27-2013, 11:19 AM   #27
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Eric, I think the reason that the exclusive truck gas engines were discontinued was the expense of manufacturing. By the time forged parts, extra bearings, and bracing to hold the block together were added up the cost was approaching diesel. Diesel was becoming more favorable in the trucking industry. We even had some Mack gas tractors, but they were switched to diesel by the mid 60s.

It just cost too much to hold a gas engine together under the loads of commercial use. The cost factor got very near diesel.
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Old 03-27-2013, 12:33 PM   #28
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Max does your PU actually have an hourmeter? Did you install it? Sounds like you must have done a lot if idling.

Yes, it came with an hour meter. I think this equates to an average of around 27 MPH. Lots of time spent in Seattle running between construction sites.

Growing up with gas engined boats, our 1967 31' Trojan had twin ford 302's I believe and we got roughly 1,200 hours out of them before re-building. Next boat was a 1976 36' Trojan, twin Mercs based on 350 block. One lasted 1,400 hours before replacemen and the other was still running when we sold it with a little over 1,500 hrs. It was going through oil quite a bit. My Dad always said that running these motors compared to driving over the pass with a full load and your foot to the floor.
Lately helping a friend find an outboard runabout, it seems that the boat with hour meters or mention them in ads have less than 500 or so hours. I don't recall seeing one listed as 1,200 hours, thus wondering what the life expectancy of outboards.
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Old 03-27-2013, 01:15 PM   #29
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Max does your PU actually have an hourmeter? Did you install it? Sounds like you must have done a lot if idling.

I think most newer p/u probably have an hour meter included in the electronics.
My 2004 GMC Duramax has 187000 miles and approx 4500 hours mostly highway. My 1990 GMC 1/2 ton gasser (350) has 250000 miles so likely over 6000 hours although no hour meter. It still runs around the farm but does run pretty rough these days.
Average maintenance on both and I usually just start up and drive away even in our Canadian winters.
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Old 03-29-2013, 06:48 AM   #30
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Still looking for a fleet car or truck story ,

Talk to the cops , lots of ideling , totally indifferent drivers but frequently pro fleet maint.

The best cop car engine I know of was the old Chrysler Canadian 318 which was a big block 440 engine cast to 318 CI.

They would easily go 300,000 miles ,in the 60's , tho the exhaust always leaked.
The exhaust manifold was not the problem , with enough heat the block warped enough for the thin sheet metal manifold gaskets to not seal.

The cops loved the reliability , but hated how old the cars were before replacement.
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:32 AM   #31
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Our little trawler uses a Honda 45 hp outboard for power. Right now it has over 1200 hrs on it and is 22 years old. I normally cruise at 6 1/2 knots and 3700 rpm so its not overtaxed. I expect it to run at least another year or so with corrosion being the end cause of its demise, not engine failure.
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Old 03-29-2013, 11:26 AM   #32
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Good point Nimble1,
Corrosion is a huge factor in the life of an OB.
Those log boom boats I mentioned earlier were used in sloughs that were about 25% salt water and the Mercury power heads were (I believe) w/o removable heads so removing the corrosion must have been difficult but they must have done it as they lasted so long.
Being an OB is a rough life w all the salt water, aluminum and gunk in the fuel/oil.

FF,
Is that the same 318 that is in so many boats?
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Old 03-30-2013, 07:28 AM   #33
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Is that the same 318 that is in so many boats?

NO
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:53 PM   #34
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Someone mention GASOLINE Engines? - LOL
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Old 04-06-2013, 11:21 PM   #35
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Max does your PU actually have an hourmeter?
FWIW our 2013 Ford pickup has an hour (and minutes and seconds) meter with each trip meter and a master hour meter.
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Old 04-07-2013, 12:00 AM   #36
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Someone mention GASOLINE Engines? - LOL
No worries, Art. The thread is "Long Lasting Gas Engines". Like unicorns, the tooth fairy and the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, it's just a myth...a fantasy...a utopian pipe dream. But it's nice to believe, isn't it?
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Old 04-07-2013, 01:02 AM   #37
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No worries, Art. The thread is "Long Lasting Gas Engines". Like unicorns, the tooth fairy and the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, it's just a myth...a fantasy...a utopian pipe dream. But it's nice to believe, isn't it?
Thread title should be:

Long lasting, low cost, quiet running, easy to maintain, fun to use, simple to replace whenever necessary Gasoline Engines!
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:51 AM   #38
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The fact you have to replace gas engines should be a clue, Art.
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Old 04-07-2013, 06:54 AM   #39
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The thread is "Long Lasting Gas Engines". Like unicorns, the tooth fairy and the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, it's just a myth...a fantasy...a utopian pipe dream. But it's nice to believe, isn't it?

With the usual boat running 200 hours a year a poorly maintained gasser will run a decade , 2000 hours if heat exchanger cooled..

A modern built gasser will run closer to 4000 hours , even more if in a displacement boat.

That could easily be 25 YEARS!

"The fact you have to replace gas engines should be a clue, Art."

There are throw away diesels (require removal to overhaul , no inframe possible) ,

CAT 3208 comes to mind .

For 200 hours a year the cost of ownership and operation would favor GAS by 2 or 3-1.

To get an idea of how easily a diesel can become trash , simply review the broker listings and see how many non sport fish have replacement diesels , some only 5 or 10 years old!!!
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Old 04-07-2013, 10:53 AM   #40
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No worries, Art. The thread is "Long Lasting Gas Engines". Like unicorns, the tooth fairy and the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, it's just a myth...a fantasy...a utopian pipe dream. But it's nice to believe, isn't it?

Watch it Al. Better keep looking over your shoulder. A unicorn could be running up behind you. That would hurt.
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