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Old 09-22-2013, 11:40 AM   #1
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Lehman SP135

Power and Motoryacht Magazine's current issue has an article on "How to extend engine life forever". In a nutshell, running lower RPM, not overheating and maintaining bolt on's seemed to be the key. Interesting they chose a Lehman SP135 for their illustrations. Just sayin'.......
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Old 09-22-2013, 03:01 PM   #2
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"How to extend engine life forever"

Talk about BS , forever is a long time!

For the 200 hour a year cruiser I would worry far more about early engine death from an improper layup than from using the engine.

ARAMAGEDDON was yesterday ,

Today we have real problems!
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Old 09-22-2013, 06:24 PM   #3
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I was thinking the same thing. Wonder how many of those Powermotoyachters want to clip along at 1800 RPM???
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Old 09-23-2013, 09:19 AM   #4
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I am a firm believer in preventative maintenance and knowing the engine and peripheral systems as best as one can. Proper upkeep is key in my opinion. This includes lube samples. Running at lower RPM's saves fuel and maybe some wear and tear, but it would seem that most engines have a load curve from the manufacturer. I would think that this curve should be followed occasionally to help prevent glazing and low temperatures and pressures that would allow carbon to build up from incomplete combustion.
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Old 09-23-2013, 09:33 AM   #5
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Bay Pelican generally runs at 1600/1650 rpm on a Lehman 135. We have taken oil samples every year for the last 15 years. This last year (winter 2012-2013) we stayed put for repairs and upgrades putting only 85 hours on the engine (some years it has been 400 to 750hrs). Oil sample showed much higher iron in the sample. Only other time I had an abnormality was a coolant leak. Was told the higher iron was do to not using the engine.

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Old 09-23-2013, 01:37 PM   #6
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I believe that high iron content in an oil sample is a sign of ring and cylinder wall wear. Could it be that you may have had an unusually high amount of starts/stops, or a lot of short trips in between samples? I cannot think of iron getting into the oil from just sitting and not being used. Maybe someone else has some knowledge of this.
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Old 09-23-2013, 03:53 PM   #7
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I cannot think of iron getting into the oil from just sitting and not being used. Maybe someone else has some knowledge of this.
Simple ... it got scraped off the liners and rings and other rusty bits during the first start after sitting for ages.
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Old 09-23-2013, 05:05 PM   #8
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The article is typical of boating mag write-ups...

We have been posting it here all along...

Many engine and oil threads always come back to if you chage your oil somewhat regularly with somewhat decent oil...even remember a filter most of the rime...your engine will last forever (because most people post that they never heard of an engine just going "bad".)

Usually it is some add on that malfunctioned and the operator either pressed on and overheated the engine terribly or ran it with water/fuel in the oil, etc...etc...

So big deal...if you read enough of these threads I truly believe you get more and better info than the magazine articles if you can sort through the random "this happened to me and I have over 16 hours of boating now" or the" it's my way or the highway" types.
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Old 09-23-2013, 05:11 PM   #9
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Actually, as I think about it, if we properly maintain and use our engines, they probably will last "forever" or certainly longer than many other componets of the boat, including ME.
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Old 09-23-2013, 07:06 PM   #10
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Simple ... it got scraped off the liners and rings and other rusty bits during the first start after sitting for ages.
Yep, that's all I could think of too.
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Old 09-24-2013, 05:47 AM   #11
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The problem for a sitting engine is not just some iron in the engine.

AS the cylinders rust pinholes are formed in the cylinder that hold oil the rings can not scrape off.

The compression is also lowered to poor sealing.

IF it smokes at cruise , it probably wasnt put to bed properly , and only a new surface on the cylinder bore and new rings will help.

On a throwaway engine its time for a big buck job!

Tho some would dump in oil thickener , and oil is cheap.
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Old 09-24-2013, 06:28 AM   #12
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AS the cylinders rust pinholes are formed in the cylinder that hold oil the rings can not scrape off.
That's a good thing. The purpose of cross-hatching is to help retain oil on the liner. Without it the rings will weld to the liner to create a phenomenon called "micro siezures" that eventually produce scuffing and accelerated liner wear.
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Old 09-25-2013, 06:18 AM   #13
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AS the cylinders rust pinholes are formed in the cylinder that hold oil the rings can not scrape off.

That's a good thing,

And you knock Pascoe for misinformation?

Sure the aluminum cylinders in Porche and other Mahl cylinders are dimpled rather than honed , but RUSTED as a posative?
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Old 09-25-2013, 07:26 AM   #14
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AS the cylinders rust pinholes are formed in the cylinder that hold oil the rings can not scrape off.

That's a good thing,

And you knock Pascoe for misinformation?

Sure the aluminum cylinders in Porche and other Mahl cylinders are dimpled rather than honed , but RUSTED as a posative?
Who said rusted is a positive?

If you knew how things worked you would know that an oil film is necessary to lubricate the liner and prevent the rings and piston from seizing to the liner. Excess oil is scraped off and returned to the sump, the small amount remaining is burned.

With the exception of some newly (in development) engines, a polished liner that holds no oil is a fault. My comment was in reference to your incorrect assumption that the rings should "scrape off" all oil. There must be an oil film present, that is why there is cross hatching, to hold oil that the rings cannot scrape off, it is required to prevent damage to rings and liner.

Until there are sufficient "pits" to lead to glazing caused by chemical changes in trapped lube oil, or excessive oil consumption, a little extra lube won't hurt much.

What creates real problems are rings that are broken from being stuck by rust or damaged so they cause vertical scoring which provides a channel for blowby.

While the surface rust that develops in a poorly stored engine is not a good thing, unless it is beyond surface rust (and that takes a long time and severe storage conditions) the chances of "killing" the engine are pretty slim. Good thing? No, of course not, but it is not the end of the world either. Most owners cause more damage to their engines trying to prevent the problem than would occur if left alone.
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Old 09-25-2013, 08:38 AM   #15
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Is non use the enemy of all diesel boats. After a lifetime on boats I still haven't figured out why the majority of breakdowns on all the systems occur as I take the boat out of storage. Is it the storage or the fact that I haven't been maintaining the various systems on a daily basis as I do when I am aboard. I tend to think that non use is the problem.

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Old 09-25-2013, 09:58 AM   #16
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Is it the storage or the fact that I haven't been maintaining the various systems on a daily basis as I do when I am aboard.
Is the work imposed by the breakdowns greater than the "normal" maintenance performed over the same period of constant use?

Generally speaking, unless storage conditions are inappropriate, the machinery doesn't know how long it has been out of operation.
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Old 09-26-2013, 06:04 AM   #17
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<My comment was in reference to your incorrect assumption that the rings should "scrape off" all oil.>

No engine scrapes ALL the oil off , the problem with pitting is there will be far too much oil to scrape off.
So the lube is burnt causing smoke and more combustion by products to crap the oil.

As noted oil is cheap. and smoke is the following boats problem.

>unless storage conditions are inappropriate, the machinery doesn't know how long it has been out of operation.<

Even the military that stores engines in a nitrogen filled air tight can uses the engine Mfg specks to pickle the engine for storage, first!

The engine is a chunk of iron that if not sealed will have condensation internally, just like a fuel tank

DD recommends an oil change before a spring start , just to remove the condensed water.

For a 6 month winter many folks get away with just fogging the engine , and praying the fuel will be OK.

A far better procedure is real storage oil (can be reclaimed/reused) and special storing fluid in the injection system. This is done to store aircraft .

Big truck stores will have special storage fluid that is added to the lube that is more volitale than lube oil and is claimed to coat the engine interior.

I prefer fogging oil as it gets the blower , valves and cylinder, $5.00 at NAPA
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Old 09-26-2013, 11:08 AM   #18
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I believe they chose the Lehman because one of their writters Bill Pike has a 32 Grandbanks with a Lehman, and obviously well cared for thus good and free photo model.

Hey FF, you actually fog your diesel? Thought that would cause a bit of a run away no?
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:37 PM   #19
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>Hey FF, you actually fog your diesel? Thought that would cause a bit of a run away no?<

NO,

Not a bit , yes the engine will burn good fogging oil , but with the engine operating the throttle is pulled to stop and the rate of oil spray (and therefore engine speed) is controlled easily.

On out 6-71 after the running fogging ,the air box covers (1 bolt each) are removed and the cylinder walls are sprayed directly .

A quick turn with the starter (fuel off) and she will sit out of season just fine.

On next start up all that oil does burn off with a HUGE blast of smoke !!

Kills the FL mosquitoes very well!
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:52 PM   #20
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Interesting thanks!
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