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Old 03-20-2013, 07:55 AM   #1
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Lehman 120 Valve cover Gasket

I am planning to replace the cork valve cover gasket on my Lehman 120.

The engine has 1750 hrs.

Looking it over this Spring I noticed the some old gasket compound squeezed out along the edge of the valve cover, prehaps a PO s was trying to prevent oil leaks. There is a small film of oil excaping from the valve cover by the aft end of the starboard side.

Anyway a new valve cover gasket is on my to do list. Should any gasket cement be used? I thought the new cork gasket should be installed without any added compound on it.

Wondering what you guys do?

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Old 03-20-2013, 08:29 AM   #2
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I never use gasket cement other than a few dabs to keep the gasket in place until it's on the head.
I do however ALWAYS turn a sheet metal cover over and slightly peen the bolt holes back to flat or a slight reverse crown as they get pulled down from the bolt pressure.
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Old 03-20-2013, 01:31 PM   #3
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I have heard some Lehman guys glue the gasket to the cover as it is a reusable gasket...I have not but might now that I'm expecting to do more under the cover this summer.
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Old 03-20-2013, 03:28 PM   #4
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Bob or Brian Smith at American Diesel will give you the correct answer.
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Old 03-20-2013, 04:19 PM   #5
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My advise would be to get a rubber gasket (maybe Felpro brand). I would also put a thin coat of automotive gasket sealant on both sides of the gasket and let it dry for a few hours prior to starting up the engine. Make sure both the valve cover and the mating part on the head is clean of all old gasket material being carful not to get any of the old crap in the head around the springs..

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Old 03-20-2013, 04:28 PM   #6
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There is no..."right or wrong" answer...it's a cork..reusable gasket (per American Diesel).

Whether you chose to glue it on no side, one side or both is purely a preference...makes no diff to the engine.

But if you do glue both sides...you just wasted a reusable gasket next time you need to get in there.

As for any other gasket and gluing...more work than necessary...the cork woks well in this application and shouldn't leak if you align it correctly and screw the cover down correctly.
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Old 03-20-2013, 04:53 PM   #7
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I've been using gasket sealant for years on head gaskets and confess that I only recently noticed there are two basic kinds: bonding, and non-bonding. Supposedly, the non-bonding will not destroy the cork when you remove the gasket for servicing the valves. However, I would strongly second the thoughts of a previous post suggesting you contact the gurus at American Diesel. The Smith boys (father and son) know that engine like the back of their hand! Great resource.
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:18 PM   #8
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Greetings,
Mr.K. I think you meant valve cover gasket as opposed to head gasket.
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Old 03-20-2013, 07:52 PM   #9
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Interesting, Never thought to glue it to the cover only.
Suppose a consult with American Diesel would answer this question.

I will post the reply when I make the call.

Thanks JohnP
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:05 PM   #10
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I'll save you the time.

This was a total coincidence. I just pulled my covers today. I had a guy sandblast them ($60 total) then I painted them with Rust-Oleum Ford Red engine paint ($3.50 with my Port Supply). I then called Brian at AD and ordered two gaskets $17 per. I asked him should I put sealer on them and he said no straight metal to cork to metal. They should arrive on Monday and Bob's your uncle
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:42 PM   #11
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Thanks much, Daddyo, for that information.
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:55 PM   #12
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Stright cork to metal is all you NEED...but the advantage of gluing them to the cover doesn't hurt a thing and makes replacing the cover a snap.

Does American Diesel actually do any mechanical work or just give advice on parts, engineering and operation?

Plenty of top notch mechs out there have learned to develop time saving and aggravaton lessening tips when actually working on engines that the manufacturer doesn't have a clue about.
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Old 03-20-2013, 11:07 PM   #13
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Bob Smith, AKA American Diesel was in charge of marinizing all the Lehmans. Spending two days with him in his diesel class was king of like visiting with Yoda. You learn from the master. I'd say they know what they are talking about.
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Old 03-20-2013, 11:17 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
Bob Smith, AKA American Diesel was in charge of marinizing all the Lehmans. Spending two days with him in his diesel class was king of like visiting with Yoda. You learn from the master. I'd say they know what they are talking about.
I'm sure Neil Armstrong knew a shi*load about the Apollo spacecraft...doesn't mean he was the guy installing the gaskets during normal repairs/building and making pieces go together without killing some engineer who didn't have to actually put it together.

I call AD too with questions...but after 50 years of working on stuff..I know enough about cork gaskets to know what is OK and what isn't...and if unsure...yeah call....but the OP's question ain't rocket science.

Just like the trick with using a paper bag as a gasket for a raw water pump. I doubt Bob teaches that in his class but I know a boatload of great commercial mechanics and fisherman who use the trick and never look back....all the time giggling at those that spend money on factory replacement gaskets and worried about a "good fit".

If the standard answer in this forum is always...call the expert or factory...I wonder why these forums even exist.

Like people posting here aren't smart enough to know that?
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Old 03-20-2013, 11:40 PM   #15
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Greetings,
Beer case (NOT corrugated) is good gasket material as well. Not that ANYONE would have something like THAT on board.

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Old 03-20-2013, 11:45 PM   #16
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If you use a cork/nitrile gasket and glue it to the cover with permatex or 3M, use a little grease or oil on the head side of the gasket. It allows you to pull the cover and not rip the gasket when your repeatedly going in there to, say, adjust the valve lash.

I am supposing English diesels are like English sports cars in this respect...
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Old 03-21-2013, 07:17 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Spy View Post
If you use a cork/nitrile gasket and glue it to the cover with permatex or 3M, use a little grease or oil on the head side of the gasket. It allows you to pull the cover and not rip the gasket when your repeatedly going in there to, say, adjust the valve lash.

I am supposing English diesels are like English sports cars in this respect...
Good tip...usually it's so oily under there just moving it around seems to keep it from sticking...
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