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Old 06-17-2012, 12:34 PM   #21
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like the old boiler screens I would guess...flanges with a screen between them for easy cleaning...some peopele add them downstream of their saltwater pump too to catch impeller pieces before they get into the heat exchanger tubes.

That's an answer that I can use. Can you recommend a site that has pictures or info about this kind of screens?

RickB, your first reply was usefull, the rest of your posts are pretty useless and negative. In the interest of keeping this thread usefull for others that might have the same problem as I have, I would appciate if you do reply any more to this thread. I decide when I have enough information to make a decision, not you.
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Old 06-17-2012, 01:01 PM   #22
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RickB, your first reply was usefull, the rest of your posts are pretty useless and negative. In the interest of keeping this thread usefull for others that might have the same problem as I have, I would appciate if you do reply any more to this thread. I decide when I have enough information to make a decision, not you.
I will respond to any post I choose thank you. If you don't like what I write, ignore it.

I hope that reality based information is useful to others who don't succumb to the sky is falling approach to boat maintenance. If you keep fishing you will undoubtedly find someone who will suggest you waste your time and money in some fashion that appeals to you.

Since you seem to have some concern for providing others with "usefull" information, tell them what it is you are so worried about and why you believe your keel cooler will continue to shed crud? What part of cleaning it properly is so offensive that buying filters and screens is a better alternative? An explanation of that would be very useful to many of us.
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Old 06-17-2012, 01:35 PM   #23
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That's an answer that I can use. Can you recommend a site that has pictures or info about this kind of screens?

RickB, your first reply was usefull, the rest of your posts are pretty useless and negative. In the interest of keeping this thread usefull for others that might have the same problem as I have, I would appciate if you do reply any more to this thread. I decide when I have enough information to make a decision, not you.
sorry no....I've heard that some just make their own out of 2 flanges and a screen.

but I think Rick is right...clean and don't worry...inspect regularly...
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:30 PM   #24
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As I said Rick. I decide when I have enough information. You don't have to call a stop to a thread just because you have passed your information and think this is the only valid answer. There are OBVIOUSLY others that can contribute. I am pretty sure that others will decide for them selfs when they have enough info.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:35 PM   #25
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You seem to have forgotten who told who to stop posting.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:40 PM   #26
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This is childish. Thanks.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:55 PM   #27
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Old 06-26-2012, 07:21 AM   #28
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I'm of the opinion that it's pretty hard for dirt to get into a closed system and once it's properly flushed and filled with the proper coolant, there should be no rust, so I can't see any value in running the coolant through a filter or screen.

We don't commonly see coolant filters on cars, trucks, or boats. If they were needed, they would be common.
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Old 06-26-2012, 07:34 AM   #29
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on modern diesels they are a little more common as the cavitation problem has became a bigger issue...so coolant filtration to keep the silicate levels good have become more popular.

the previous owner/head mechanic of the assistance towing fleet I work for even put them on the gas engines.
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Old 06-26-2012, 11:48 AM   #30
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on modern diesels they are a little more common as the cavitation problem has became a bigger issue...so coolant filtration to keep the silicate levels good have become more popular.
A more reasonable approach might be to change to a silicate-free coolant such as CAT's ELC extended life coolant. Such a choice would eliminate concerns about high silicate levels, problems with nitrates, and the added expense and complexity (read that as point of potential failure) that are associated with adding another component to the engine.

I know it is not much fun and doesn't provide anything in way of bragging rights or bling, but simply cleaning the cooling circuit, maintaining the pump, and using the proper coolant is about all you have to do to obtain long and trouble-free life from the jacket water cooling circuit of a recreational boat engine.
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Old 06-26-2012, 12:11 PM   #31
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A more reasonable approach might be to change to a silicate-free coolant such as CAT's ELC extended life coolant. Such a choice would eliminate concerns about high silicate levels, problems with nitrates, and the added expense and complexity (read that as point of potential failure) that are associated with adding another component to the engine.

I know it is not much fun and doesn't provide anything in way of bragging rights or bling, but simply cleaning the cooling circuit, maintaining the pump, and using the proper coolant is about all you have to do to obtain long and trouble-free life from the jacket water cooling circuit of a recreational boat engine.

I know and that's what I've done to my boat and powerstroke...but there is another "option"...train of thought...whatever you want to call it...

Lot's of people do it for reasons they feel comfortable with...and it's not all the "diesel bling" thing either.
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:53 AM   #32
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"Have any of you read the discussions in the truck forums about these filters and why they use them?

Basically, dirt in the coolant clogs the passages inside the engine. In time this can create wear and hot spots in the engine, for example around the wet cylinders, with serious consequences.

To me, it seems that these filters could be a cheap insurance".

One of the biggest advantages of using a coolant filter is the element in many will add chemicals during the filters life.

The rust inhibitors , Supplementary ,cooling additives all have a limited service life and its easiest for the filter to take care of the replenishment.

Otherwise kits to measure the anti freeze chemicals and add what is required can be found at truck places for hands on folks.

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Old 06-28-2012, 04:35 PM   #33
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"Have any of you read the discussions in the truck forums about these filters and why they use them?

Basically, dirt in the coolant clogs the passages inside the engine. In time this can create wear and hot spots in the engine, for example around the wet cylinders, with serious consequences.

To me, it seems that these filters could be a cheap insurance".

..........
So how does dirt enter a closed cooling system?
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Old 06-28-2012, 04:38 PM   #34
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So how does dirt enter a closed cooling system?
When the truck driver sticks his finger in to check the level, of course.
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Old 06-29-2012, 06:31 AM   #35
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Most engines , in boats cars or trucks are made from vastly different materials.

Cast iron block, copper or alluminum radiator , copper nickle heat exchanger, loads of different stuff.

The anti-freez is supposed to slow the electrical potential .

The sealants and rubber hoses also die internally and add to the coolant mix.

Add a tiny exhaust leak and you get a witches brew.

For best cooling 100% distilled water would be fine , but it would have no additives , so should be considered as a get home only.

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Old 06-29-2012, 08:37 AM   #36
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.................
For best cooling 100% distilled water would be fine , but it would have no additives , so should be considered as a get home only.
I use a 50/50 mix of distilled water and Volvo ($27.00 per gallon) special coolant and I drain and flush the cooling system and replace with fresh coolant and distilled water as per the manufacturer's requirements.

Some folks have suggested buying Prestone or another well known coolant to save money. I figure using the approved coolant isn't expensive compared to boating in general or the repairs the wrong coolant might cause.
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Old 07-01-2012, 07:12 AM   #37
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Some folks have suggested buying Prestone or another well known coolant to save money.

IT will, IF the engine holds the cylinder liners in a cast sleive , as on most older engines.

The new engines where the cylinder sleive is exposed to the coolant required the protection of a SCA to prevent cavitation (as the cylinder expands and contracts) from eating thru the cylinder.

Old Detroit ? , water or cheap antifreez is fine.

New Series 60 or similar OTR truck marinization, you better have the SCA.

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Old 07-01-2012, 07:41 AM   #38
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Supplemental Coolant Additives (SCAs)
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Old 07-01-2012, 08:00 AM   #39
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Silicates unless you have switched to OAT based coolant. Like Final charge, Dexcool, Global Extended, FleetGuard series...Cat ELC like RickB mentioned
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