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Old 08-12-2019, 10:23 AM   #21
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Those look like air compressor water separators which are used by car owners to coalesce crankcase gasses in order to reduce the blow by.

Is there any oily residue in the outlets? If not they are working fine.

That's a fine looking ER.
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:28 AM   #22
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I'd worry those compressed air filters might not handle the blowby flow. Might be fine, but could pressurize crankcase.

While running at cruise, loosen oil fill cap and see if any pressure is built up.
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:45 AM   #23
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As for carbon build up on intake valves.

I don't know if diesels suffer the same carbon build up as gas engines but in the automotive world, they are having carbon issues with direct injection engines.

Previous throttle body injection and even carburetors introduced fuel upstream of the intake valves. The fuel flowing past the valve stems and the back of the valves washed any oily residue off preventing fouling.

On the new direct injection engines, the fuel is injected inside the combustion chamber. No fuel flows past the valves. Oily residue from crankcase gases via the PCV system, builds up on the valve stems, back of valves and intake ports. Heat from the engine bakes the residue onto the valves. Eventually the build up gets so thick that the valves will not open or close completely.

The carbon issue is starting to surface and auto manufacturers are keeping quiet about it. There's been engines rebuilt and replaced on warranty due to carbon build up. Some BMW dealers and independent shops are selling a walnut blasting cleaning of the intake.

Some auto manufacturers are placing an extra injector upstream of the intake valve to wash the valve. Others are scratching their heads.
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Old 08-12-2019, 02:58 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
You just wanted to show off that ER to make the rest of us super jealous.

I have never seen a set up like that. I would pull the air filters and have a good look inside the intakes. If you see a heavy oily residue I would change over to a crankcase vent system using a tank. It's good to catch oil before it gets back to the intake. Some engines can get carbon build up on the back of the intake valves and in the intake manifold from blow by being suck back into the engine. If you don't see any oily residue inside the intake, I wouldn't change a thing.
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Those look like air compressor water separators which are used by car owners to coalesce crankcase gasses in order to reduce the blow by.

Is there any oily residue in the outlets? If not they are working fine.

That's a fine looking ER.
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Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
I'd worry those compressed air filters might not handle the blowby flow. Might be fine, but could pressurize crankcase.

While running at cruise, loosen oil fill cap and see if any pressure is built up.
Thanks for the ideas and compliments. Syjos, thatís exactly what I was told they are. Ski, Iíll check the pressure. Lord knows how many miles and hundreds of hours they have on them.
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Old 08-12-2019, 03:19 PM   #25
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Old 08-12-2019, 05:24 PM   #26
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Thanks for the ideas and compliments. Syjos, thatís exactly what I was told they are. Ski, Iíll check the pressure. Lord knows how many miles and hundreds of hours they have on them.
The air compressor water separators handle a lot more air volume than an engines crankcase blowby.

The vacuum created by the engines intake assist in scavenging the crankcase gases out of the engine. Unless your rings are worn excessively, there should not be a lot of pressure out of the PVC exit on the valve cover.

The filter elements in the air compressor filters may be clogged with oil. Most air compressor filters are washable.
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Old 08-13-2019, 08:50 AM   #27
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I'd worry those compressed air filters might not handle the blowby flow. Might be fine, but could pressurize crankcase.

While running at cruise, loosen oil fill cap and see if any pressure is built up.

Most of those are capable of flowing 20cfm or a bit more. I doubt that an engine produces that much flow through the crankcase.


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Originally Posted by syjos View Post
As for carbon build up on intake valves.

I don't know if diesels suffer the same carbon build up as gas engines but in the automotive world, they are having carbon issues with direct injection engines.

Previous throttle body injection and even carburetors introduced fuel upstream of the intake valves. The fuel flowing past the valve stems and the back of the valves washed any oily residue off preventing fouling.

On the new direct injection engines, the fuel is injected inside the combustion chamber. No fuel flows past the valves. Oily residue from crankcase gases via the PCV system, builds up on the valve stems, back of valves and intake ports. Heat from the engine bakes the residue onto the valves. Eventually the build up gets so thick that the valves will not open or close completely.

The carbon issue is starting to surface and auto manufacturers are keeping quiet about it. There's been engines rebuilt and replaced on warranty due to carbon build up. Some BMW dealers and independent shops are selling a walnut blasting cleaning of the intake.

Some auto manufacturers are placing an extra injector upstream of the intake valve to wash the valve. Others are scratching their heads.

Oh yeah. Diesels can get it really bad. Gas engines don't have carbon problems because gas is constantly flowing around the intake valves taking the carbon with it. The exhaust lves will carbon foul due to leaking valve oil seals and sloppy valve guides. The newer direct-injected gas engines are bad to carbon foul the intake valves. We own a Kia Soul that is having problems with that and it just rolled over 100,000 miles.



Here's a video about intake carbon build up in a diesel.





GDI engine problems.
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:34 AM   #28
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If you Google direct injection carbon fouling, or oil catch can, you will get hundreds of articles, blogs and auto forum posts about it.

It gets really interesting when oil catch cans gets discussed as to which ones work and which ones don't. Catch can manufacturers start bad mouthing other manufacturers products and tout their $400 catch cans.

It is almost as fun as discussions on TF about single vs twin and displacement vs semi .
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Old 08-13-2019, 01:25 PM   #29
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Most of those are capable of flowing 20cfm or a bit more. I doubt that an engine produces that much flow through the crankcase.
The 20cfm rating is likely at atmospheric pressure (STP). So at 10 bar, the volumetric flow rate is more like 2cfm.

Obviously he has had no issue with it, but still worth checking for pressure in the crankcase.
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Old 08-13-2019, 08:51 PM   #30
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The 20cfm rating is likely at atmospheric pressure (STP). So at 10 bar, the volumetric flow rate is more like 2cfm.

Obviously he has had no issue with it, but still worth checking for pressure in the crankcase.

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