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Old 01-19-2018, 06:41 PM   #1
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I love buying new tools

Going to get down and dirty with my Ford Lehman's soon and wanted to test the injectors.

Love getting tools that expand my DIY capabilities.

As my Dad says "you'll never regret paying for the right tool for a job. It'll pay you back for years"
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Old 01-19-2018, 06:49 PM   #2
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I bought an inexpensive pop tester 2 years ago....my engine seemed to be running fine and a head job last summet confirmed it. But I wanted to check things out.
The pop tester didnt like a couple injectors so I replaced tbe whole set.

I am not sure the cheap pop testers can be trusted a 100 percent.

But better than nothing when totally in doubt.
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Old 01-19-2018, 07:07 PM   #3
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Just curious, how many folks carry spare injectors?

If a fuel line carries away, what is the proper recommendation, let it continue to pump the fuel or make an attempt to squeeze the pressure side of the line shut?

Tonight, I spent a hour reading the news. Nothing good is happening.
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Old 01-19-2018, 07:38 PM   #4
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Going to get down and dirty with my Ford Lehman's soon and wanted to test the injectors.

Love getting tools that expand my DIY capabilities.

As my Dad says "you'll never regret paying for the right tool for a job. It'll pay you back for years"
I'm a tool junkie, boat and home. Here's an old DYI saying that I tell my wife when I'm tool-buying and it's pretty true....If you successfully do a job yourself without hiring someone to do it, the tools are free. The operative word is 'successful'. I don't always tell her when things go completely south, but the saying mostly holds true..
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Old 01-19-2018, 07:45 PM   #5
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Ken, I agree!
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Old 01-19-2018, 08:08 PM   #6
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My problem is I can’t afford a boat big enough to hold all my tools, so I have resorted to driving a mobile dock box (pickup with construction type fiberglass shell)...
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Old 01-19-2018, 08:13 PM   #7
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My pliers and screw drivers have paid for themselves over and over.
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Old 01-19-2018, 09:58 PM   #8
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Just curious, how many folks carry spare injectors?

If a fuel line carries away, what is the proper recommendation, let it continue to pump the fuel or make an attempt to squeeze the pressure side of the line shut?

Tonight, I spent a hour reading the news. Nothing good is happening.
I carry a complete set of injector lines after losing the number 1 injector line while off the coast of New Jersey. No it is not a good idea to squeeze the injector line closed. You'll injure the injector pump and they are way expensive.

Your choices are try to contain the squirt in a bucket or shut down and get a tow. I chose the tow. It may have been psneeld that towed me back.

Can't help you with the news.
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Old 01-19-2018, 10:08 PM   #9
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My wife says I have never met a tool I didn’t need.
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Old 01-20-2018, 12:03 AM   #10
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My wife says I have never met a tool I didn’t need.


Me too, but then I fix the dryer or replace the brakes or install a cabinet and I’m suddenly a genius.
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Old 01-20-2018, 12:34 AM   #11
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...I tell my wife when I'm tool-buying and it's pretty true....If you successfully do a job yourself without hiring someone to do it, the tools are free....
Hahaha! I take that one and run with it all the time.

Just bought a second VHF for the boat. My converted fishing boat has an aluminum bipod mast with a crossbar at the top. It wasn't long enough to accommodate two antennae with proper separation. What to do?

Off to the scrap metal place for some aluminum. Off to Hardware Sales for welding rod. Spent half a day teaching myself to weld aluminum. Hey presto! Most expensive damned bit of aluminum on any boat I've ever owned!
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Old 01-20-2018, 09:06 AM   #12
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I'm just going to assume that everyone else here has noticed that magnetic attraction between any hand tool, and wait for it, water. I contributed quite a few tools to Neptune and Poseidon - but I must admit more were lost on my sailboat than on my old wood cruiser
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Old 01-20-2018, 09:30 AM   #13
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I've always said - and acted upon - the thought that one should buy the tool one needs to get a particular job done. That tool will inevitably be used over and over on new jobs one never had contemplated doing. That said, I've begun collecting doubles or even triples of some tools and that's not counting those that live on the boat or in the car. I maintain a couple major tools in the basement shop and duplicates in the barn. Then, I inherited some multiples from my dad's collection...

Happily for those within hearing, I very seldom - dare I tempt fate - never have dropped tools overboard. I did drop a steel tape into a concrete block core at the top of a foundation wall; very annoying to look down several feet to see it shining away and know the non-ferrous case rendered it totally unreachable.
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Old 01-20-2018, 09:35 AM   #14
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With respect to diesel fuel lines, I spent a lovely several hours going back and forth from cookstove to engine replacing a broken fuel line with one found in a heap in the forepeak of a friend's sailboat that I was crewing on, while taking it from St Thomas to Boston. I heated the line to cherry red, unbent and rebent it bit by bit to get it to fit the Perkins.

Successfully.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:08 AM   #15
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I have always found that buying the tools and the parts to do a job is much easier than actually doing the job.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:23 AM   #16
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With respect to diesel fuel lines, I spent a lovely several hours going back and forth from cookstove to engine replacing a broken fuel line with one found in a heap in the forepeak of a friend's sailboat that I was crewing on, while taking it from St Thomas to Boston. I heated the line to cherry red, unbent and rebent it bit by bit to get it to fit the Perkins.

Successfully.
A good hint to bend copper tubing without crushing them is to fill them with soapy waterr and put them in the freezer. Soapy water will freeze but stay like slush giving a support for the tubing interior wall and prevent crushing while bending. That is the way they bend tubing for copper instruments like trumpet.

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Old 01-20-2018, 10:25 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by DHeckrotte View Post
I've always said - and acted upon - the thought that one should buy the tool one needs to get a particular job done. That tool will inevitably be used over and over on new jobs one never had contemplated doing. That said, I've begun collecting doubles or even triples of some tools and that's not counting those that live on the boat or in the car. I maintain a couple major tools in the basement shop and duplicates in the barn. Then, I inherited some multiples from my dad's collection...

Happily for those within hearing, I very seldom - dare I tempt fate - never have dropped tools overboard. I did drop a steel tape into a concrete block core at the top of a foundation wall; very annoying to look down several feet to see it shining away and know the non-ferrous case rendered it totally unreachable.
I also have duplicates like screwdrivers, you never have too many!
Before buying a tool I always think of reuse, if it is single specific usage it may become expensive.

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Old 01-20-2018, 11:05 AM   #18
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With respect to diesel fuel lines, I spent a lovely several hours going back and forth from cookstove to engine replacing a broken fuel line with one found in a heap in the forepeak of a friend's sailboat that I was crewing on, while taking it from St Thomas to Boston. I heated the line to cherry red, unbent and rebent it bit by bit to get it to fit the Perkins.

Successfully.
Would it be practical/possible to have a couple of emergency fuel lines made using high-pressure hose and appropriate fittings? We have Lehman 135s and it seems like a one-foot and two-foot hose would cover the waterfront if we had a breakdown—enough to limp back to civilization perhaps—and allow for quick change-outs. Cheaper, as well, than carrying a full set of spares.
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Old 01-20-2018, 11:27 AM   #19
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Would it be practical/possible to have a couple of emergency fuel lines made using high-pressure hose and appropriate fittings? We have Lehman 135s and it seems like a one-foot and two-foot hose would cover the waterfront if we had a breakdown—enough to limp back to civilization perhaps—and allow for quick change-outs. Cheaper, as well, than carrying a full set of spares.
You might be able to but the difficulty is the fitting at the injectors and also where the line goes through the rubber gasket just befor the injector. That could be a challenge. We bought a spare set 6 for our FL SP135 for less than $200.
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Old 01-20-2018, 11:35 AM   #20
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When I had my 46ft trawler, I had 3 or 4 bags of tools and 3 metal boxes for screws, organize by # and length. Downsized to a 34ft trawler, 1 bag of tools, a small tool box, one metal box for screws and various small plastic jars of mixed size and # screws. Also a compliment of wire crimp fittings and lots of wire ties.

I tell folks, I have 2 screw drivers and two different sized adjustable wrenches, 1 plier and duct tape. Now one asks to borrow my tools. I guess they feel sorry for me. LOL
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