Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-07-2018, 04:26 PM   #1
Member
 
City: Chattanooga
Country: United States
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 9
How to Evaluate Stale Engines

Hi all
Newbie currently looking at a few boats in my search for the perfect one. I'm limited in initial budget, so some of the vessels I'm considering have been on the hard for more than a couple of years.

One in particular has twin Ford Lehman's that the seller states "worked great until I pulled the boat". It hasn't been in the water for 3 years.

The rest of the boat looks well kept and good shape except for an obvious need to re-caulk the teak decking.

So how do I evaluate the engines. If the fluids are changed, can they be turned over out of water? Newbie question Background is all sailboats, so I appreciate any suggestions!
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Ragbagger turned stinkpotter.
BradC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 04:49 PM   #2
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23- outboard
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,410
A marine engine can be started on the hard. Keep it near idle and only run for 30 seconds. An easy cold start says a lot of good things about an engine.

If you want to run it longer then put a garden hose in the strainer. The engine will suck up the water. You can’t put a load on it, but running it for five minutes should let the smoke clear.

If it starts within five seconds and the smoke clears within a few minutes then it is worth a real seatrial.

David
__________________

djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 04:54 PM   #3
Member
 
City: Chattanooga
Country: United States
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 9
Thanks-
Any concerns with fluids that set for a few years for a cold start? Is it advisable to change, drain and replace, or if things look and smell ok, a short start is ok with old fluids?
__________________
Ragbagger turned stinkpotter.
BradC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 04:58 PM   #4
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 9,506
BradC,you didn`t ask about the teak decking but,if it is a boat of the vintage the durable twin Lehmans imply,consider if it needs more than recaulking. You may be faced with replacing the teak, or removal and conversion to a painted f/g finish, which can be as expensive as fixing engines.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 05:00 PM   #5
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5,000
Don't worry about the fluids. They can be changed later. Make sure fluid levels are ok, though.

Do bring a big wrench and rotate each engine a few turns before doing any start attempt.

Try to get some water to the sea water pump as its impeller is likely dry, it will shred if run dry. Other than that you can idle the engines without raw water flow for a minute or so. Long enough to know if they are poop or not.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 05:01 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
City: Boston
Country: US
Vessel Model: IG 30
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 418
As long as there is oil in the engine and transmissions you can turn the engines over. You may destroy the impellers in the process so the owner may not be to thrilled at the idea. Typically the batteries are dead so starting may not be an option. Even with a good battery the starters may have rusted so the starters will spin but won't engage.

You can run the engines on just the fresh water system until they reach operating temp.(although the impellers will be toast) At that point you will need the raw water cooling or you could overheat the engines.

You can bar the engines over by putting a wrench on the crank nut. Might be a 7/8 or 15/16 wrench. If the engines turn, they are probably OK.
SoWhat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 08:09 PM   #7
Guru
 
Sailor of Fortune's Avatar
 
City: Saint Augustine, Fl.
Country: Port of St Augustine ,FL
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Don't worry about the fluids. They can be changed later. Make sure fluid levels are ok, though.

Do bring a big wrench and rotate each engine a few turns before doing any start attempt.

Try to get some water to the sea water pump as its impeller is likely dry, it will shred if run dry. Other than that you can idle the engines without raw water flow for a minute or so. Long enough to know if they are poop or not.
Dishwashing liquid bath on impeller,after pulling cover?
__________________
Jack (Steve?)
Sailor of Fortune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 08:51 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Roamer Blue's Avatar
 
City: Toronto ON
Country: Canada
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 126
safety first, make sure the props are clear...



unintended spin could be a catastrophe.
Roamer Blue is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2018, 02:38 AM   #9
Guru
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Country: US
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,357
Take the impeller out if you're not going to supply water. When you put them back in, if they look ok and are pliable, put waterproof grease in the housing and on the end plate. Just smear it with your finger. That way when it does pump it's first water the pumps will have better suction because the grease seals better than the impeller alone.
Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2018, 06:01 AM   #10
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 18,928
If the boat is worth the effort to attempt a start , yes, remove the sea water impeller.


If the engine cranks and seems OK, purchase a new impeller and seal and install it.


The huge PIA of an impeller shedding pieces to be chased and perhaps requiring massive removal of parts to reverse flush , is simply not worth the cost of an impeller.


So if you buy her you are way ahead.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2018, 08:18 AM   #11
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 7,762
Quote:
Originally Posted by BradC View Post
Hi all
Newbie currently looking at a few boats in my search for the perfect one. I'm limited in initial budget, so some of the vessels I'm considering have been on the hard for more than a couple of years.

One in particular has twin Ford Lehman's that the seller states "worked great until I pulled the boat". It hasn't been in the water for 3 years.

The rest of the boat looks well kept and good shape except for an obvious need to re-caulk the teak decking.

So how do I evaluate the engines. If the fluids are changed, can they be turned over out of water? Newbie question Background is all sailboats, so I appreciate any suggestions!
Is this a where is as is sale? If not, suggest you have the owner satisfy these engine operable questions and demonstrate and represent via the listing broker that the engines are currently in good working order.

Further, the owner should pay for and take responsibility for getting the vessel in the water, sitting and ready for a visual inspection prior to survey. Hopefully no egregious leaks and mechanical/electrical problems are noted. Then you can consider an offer followed by a survey and sea trial to put the vessel through its paces.

Beware of unused vessels, especially when on the hard. It may not have been in the water for 3 (or more) years for a multitude of reasons.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2018, 09:00 AM   #12
Member
 
City: Chattanooga
Country: United States
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
Is this a where is as is sale? If not, suggest you have the owner satisfy these engine operable questions and demonstrate and represent via the listing broker that the engines are currently in good working order.

Further, the owner should pay for and take responsibility for getting the vessel in the water, sitting and ready for a visual inspection prior to survey. Hopefully no egregious leaks and mechanical/electrical problems are noted. Then you can consider an offer followed by a survey and sea trial to put the vessel through its paces.

Beware of unused vessels, especially when on the hard. It may not have been in the water for 3 (or more) years for a multitude of reasons.

This is an "as is" listing. The seller is in another state. He pulled the boat when he moved 3yrs ago with the intention of retrieving it, but do to financial issues, was unable. Has no problem if I want to pay for the haul and drop for a sea trial, but won't pay for it himself. The price is low for the boat, so even if it required a few grand to return to basic order, well worth it. Not worth it if I need to rebuild one or more engines, however.
__________________
Ragbagger turned stinkpotter.
BradC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2018, 09:01 AM   #13
Member
 
City: Chattanooga
Country: United States
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
If the boat is worth the effort to attempt a start , yes, remove the sea water impeller.


If the engine cranks and seems OK, purchase a new impeller and seal and install it.


The huge PIA of an impeller shedding pieces to be chased and perhaps requiring massive removal of parts to reverse flush , is simply not worth the cost of an impeller.


So if you buy her you are way ahead.

Thank you. I like not creating additional work for myself, regardless of the type...
__________________

__________________
Ragbagger turned stinkpotter.
BradC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012