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Old 01-18-2013, 07:51 AM   #21
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Then how can you tell the difference, Fred?
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Old 01-18-2013, 09:56 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
No auto parts store clamps for me.
The ones I buy from NAPA are all stainless steel...and are "Marine grade"... I've been using them for some time and I am rather pleased with them.

NAPA AUTO PARTS

NAPA AUTO PARTS

I don't use low quality clamps either.
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Old 01-18-2013, 12:55 PM   #23
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It has to say, "All Stainless" on the clamp for me to use it on my boat.

"ALL" stainless is like "Hi Fi" in days of yore.

Meaningless as there are probably 100 grades of SS.

Not all are suitable for sea water.
OK, let me elaborate.
If you use a plain clamp, the whole thing will rust.
If you use a stainless clamp, the band will likely hold up but the bolt will rust.
If you use an "All Stainless" clamp, neither will rust.

I'm only speaking from personal experience, but all the "All Stainless" clamps I have used from many different sources have held up fine.

Not suitable for sea water, or not suitable for my boat? There's jewelry and there's utility...absolute perfection or good enough. I favor the good enough route preferring to spend the money on dynamic adventure.
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Old 01-18-2013, 02:55 PM   #24
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316 is preferable to 304 in salt water environments as it has a higher resistance to chloride corrosion. If it doesn't say all 316, then it is probably 304. I use AWAB.
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Old 01-18-2013, 09:17 PM   #25
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Healhustler, Thanks for the plug! I guess I owe you a lunch for that.
Thought I would let you know about me dropping your name also... You'll have to page down in the post....

Living Aboard Forum, Life Aboard • View topic - Great Links to save you money
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Old 01-18-2013, 10:11 PM   #26
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AWAB's are great for any application that does not require a constant torque or T Clamp, such as most sea water, fresh water low temp and low pressure fittings. Get rid of all those through-perforated things you can.. starting in the bilge where they will eventually corrode and break, regardless of stainless quality, and there and anywhere else will shorten the life of the hose. The NAPA stainless constant torques and T clamps are very good, or you can go to West and buy exactly the very same thing for 3X. But those linked NAPA perforated clamps, uh uh anywhere near salt water.
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Old 01-19-2013, 07:08 AM   #27
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It cracks me up about the "must have this" concept....

There are all kind of applications even in the bilge where clamps never seem to rust and others where even good clamps take a beating....usually salt water side of things or in the splash zone and then others...

The are plenty of applications where a wire tie or two would be perfectly adequate....low pressure or vacuum side of systems.

Seems to me that when a hose survives long enough that even a 304 clamp has rusted away...I need to cut the hose off the nipple and the clamp wasn't doing much since it welded the hose to the nipple in the first couple of months of application.
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Old 01-19-2013, 09:18 AM   #28
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In the grand scheme of things, the price difference between hose clamps compared to the cost of your boat is pretty insignificant. I'm not going to go through the boat and say to myself "I need the best quality clamp here." or "I can get by with a cheaper, lower quality clamp here."

I just buy the best quality all stainless steel marine clamps I can find and use them even where I could save a dollar on a cheaper clamp.
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Old 01-19-2013, 09:27 AM   #29
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Some people don't always have the luxury of either the money the time the ability to obtain or a million other reasons to use a higher quality clamp....and then they learn what really works or not and what's really necessary or not...

My point wasn't necessarily to point ot how to save a buck as much as it was to show that some people throw money at boats in places they don't have to....

If you are scared of losing a boat because of the quality of hose clamps..and where they are necessary or not...well then use whatever you want...
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Old 01-19-2013, 10:57 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnick View Post
Lastly, it's nice to have a single wrench for hose clamps so the tightening hexes should all be the same size.
This is a great point. It really robs one of maintenance motivation to crawl down in some tight space with a box of tools to just tighten hose clamps. My plan since I've owned the boat is to replace all clamps with the same quality type. I've now got one "hose clamp driver) in each of my engine compartments. Whenever I'm down there for whatever reason, the driver is there for me to check clamps. Sometime before we go full time cruising in July, all those clamps will be the same. Some may be difficult to get to, but it sure is reassuring that when I get into that cramped spot, I'll no longer be cussing up a storm because I need another fricken tool. The angles of access to the clamp screw also takes forethought. At the risk of sounding anal about it, I can tell when someone else has been moving my hose clamps. Ultimately, they end up at some angle that is nearly impossible to get at. How often have you spent marathon time down in your hot engine room and got beat-up or burnt while reciting every expletive you could think of just because you kept slipping off a hose clamp with a screwdriver? Those of you with stand-up engine rooms, disregard this post.
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Old 01-19-2013, 10:59 AM   #31
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This topic is but one reason this forum is so great... A bit off topic, but as part of my maintenance (and safety) routine I keep a Clamp-Aid on every hose clamp. Last thing I need at or away from the dock is a slashed wrist from a hose clamp end. Then I realized that by changing every clamp cover to a different color each year I would be forced to put my hands on every clamp on the boat. Clamp-Aids come in lots of colors and I buy by the 100 count bag.
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:11 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by healhustler View Post
Whenever I'm down there for whatever reason, the driver is there for me to check clamps. Sometime before we go full time cruising in July, all those clamps will be the same. Some may be difficult to get to, but it sure is reassuring that when I get into that cramped spot, I'll no longer be cussing up a storm because I need another fricken tool.
I too keep nut drivers at the redy. However, I think we all know that stretch is what holds any fastener tight. My question is; what is too tight or not tight enough? Not tight enough they can vibrate loose. Too tight and you take the chance of premature failure.


Are you ever concerned that tightening a loose clamp is because it was not tighten sufficiently to begin with, or has over tightening caused the clamp to stretch beyond its metalic elastic range resulting in a clamp that is permanently weakened and will never stay "tight enough?"
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:22 AM   #33
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Greetings,
Mr. BA. You raise an excellent point. What is the "Goldilocks" setting for hose clamps? The vast majority of failure situations I have had are rust related with just a few being "stripped" sections on the band.
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:30 AM   #34
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Greetings,
Mr. BA. You raise an excellent point. What is the "Goldilocks" setting for hose clamps? The vast majority of failure situations I have had are rust related with just a few being "stripped" sections on the band.
Yeah, but you both have a point. I've stripped out both the cheap kind and the quality kind for the hell of it, just to see what they would take. I'm not going to keep a torque wrench handy, but if the clamp is high quality, I typically tighten it to feel and then back off just a bit. I find the quality clamps stay tighter over time, but it probably represents the lack of stretch vs. the cheapo. I pay particular attention to below waterline AND any hot water line due to the consistent expansion/contraction of the fitting.
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:34 AM   #35
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Hose clamp manufacturers publish torque recomendations for how tight to make them but I've never seen anyone actually use a torque wrench to install hose clamps.
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:42 AM   #36
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This conversation is compelling me to investigate torque settings (I read somewhere 30-40 inch pounds). I can torque a few then check how this feels with my nut driver. Hopefully my memory muscle will work better than my regular memory...
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Old 01-19-2013, 01:05 PM   #37
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Plumbers use T-handle designed torque wrenches installing No-Hub cast iron waste pipe. 60 inch pounds is the standard. The tool is available anywhere cast iron pipe and fittings are sold, typically plumbing wholesale houses.

Even more popular are nut drivers in a cordless impact driver drill. Standard battery drills with a clutch where used by plumbers on large jobs for this task until discovering that the impact drills could not strip the hose clamps no matter how long you left it on the clamp. Eventually the clamp will cut completely through the rubber but it will not strip.
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Old 01-19-2013, 02:03 PM   #38
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Now this has really helped me. I'm heading to plumbing supply. Over torque is my biggest concern cuz of stripping clamp and cutting hose. I never left a clamp too loose.
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Old 01-19-2013, 02:04 PM   #39
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Too tight and you are damaging the hose...the clamps themselves are tough to damage as long as you are just using a nut driver/screwdriver....but I have been finding lately a lot of clamps will let the screw back out instead of loosening....even some of the "better clamps"

Because this is such a tough crowd...maybe this will help...

BoatUS on hose clamps

Install ‘em Right: An informal survey of boat owners here at BoatU.S. headquarters on how tight hose clamps should be caused a lot of head scratching. How do you know if your clamps are tight enough without being overtightened? Clamp manufacturers have tables with torque specifications, but how many boaters have an inch/pound torque wrench in their pocket protector? Craig Senovich, an engineer at Tridon, did an informal test for Seaworthy to find out how much torque an average person could muster on a hose clamp. Craig gathered a few co-workers, and using a sophisticated measuring device, invited everyone to crank their hardest on a hose clamp using a nut driver (similar to a screwdriver, but less likely to slip). The average person could produce about 37 inch/pounds (interestingly, using gloves nearly doubled that figure). That number happens to be very close to the specifications for a clamp in the 5/8- to 1 1/2-inch range. Craig then put a 6-inch ratchet on the clamp. Though he easily could have kept turning, he stopped at 381 inch/pounds so he wouldn’t damage the testing equipment. Lesson: Use a screw or nut driver and don’t be afraid to hand-tighten unless you’re built like a linebacker— then you’ll need to use a proper torque wrench.

Most good hose barb/hose connections really don't even need clamps...unless under a lot of pressure...

I know they are a special application....push loks go over 200 psi without clamps. many things in an engine room barely need clamps if the barbs are new, not a lot of pressure or vibration.

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Old 01-19-2013, 02:11 PM   #40
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Greetings,
Thanks for posting that excerpt Mr. psneeld. I usually give gear clamps about a 1/2 grunt effort which is the torque "value" for my purposes. The odd time, if I happen to have a nut driver in my hands, I will give a "snug up" on clamps. I've never found any thus far that seemed loose enough to give me any concern. Hmmmm.....maybe time to put "Check ALL gear clamps" on my To Do list. Aw Rats!
I absolutely DESPISE using a slot screwdriver on almost anything....The Devil's invention....only good for opening paint/varnish cans.
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