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Old 06-29-2015, 10:55 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
Carrying fuel for a year or more is just asking for problems.
Here's some shots of our Racor bowl starting from when we purchased Badger. (Was tied to the dock for about 3 years with full tanks prior to purchase...was fired up every month or so in the slip).

First photo: 2013...gunk to the centrifuge.
Second photo: 2014...gunk halfway to the centrifuge. Third photo: this is how it looks in 2015...no more gunk!
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Old 06-29-2015, 02:16 PM   #22
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What ??? Algae cant grow in diesel ? Dont tell everybody, it'll just be our secret.
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Old 06-29-2015, 10:25 PM   #23
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It is absolutely impossible for algae to develop in a diesel fuel tank...... period.
If there is water in the tank or filter bowl, there are some forms of bacteria that may form at the diesel/water interface but NOT algae.
This is correct. The growth ("bugs") that can occur at the water/fuel interface in a diesel fuel tank is bacteria, not algae. Algae needs light to grow. Precious little of that inside a fuel tank.
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Old 06-30-2015, 12:14 AM   #24
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Microbial growth is a more accurate term than algae.
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Old 06-30-2015, 12:16 AM   #25
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Microbial growth is a more accurate term than algae.
Probably more accurate than bacteria, actually.....
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Old 06-30-2015, 12:30 AM   #26
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I guess this Is one advantage of owning a planing boat that uses a lot of fuel. My Marina has Valvtect and I run through it quite often. My engines pump about 5 times more than they use so they self polish as well. My filter bowls sparkle a bright clear red!!!
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Old 06-30-2015, 12:41 AM   #27
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Actually, there are two major groups of microbiological contamination in diesel fuels; bacteria and fungi.

Bacteria are single-cell organisms that lack a membrane-bound nucleus.

In contrast, fungi do have a defined nucleus. The nucleus is the organelle which contains most of the cellís genetic material.

Below are lists of the bacteria and fungi most commonly recovered from diesel fuel and associated water in fuel tanks and distribution systems.

Bacteria
Pseudomonas species
Flavobacterium species
Sarcina species
Desulfovibrio species
Desulfotomaculum species
Hydrogenomonas species
Clostridium species

Fungi
Hormoconis resinae (formerly classified as Cladosporium)
Fusarium species
Candida species
Aspergillus species

In some instances it can be important to differentiate between bacteria and fungi because they are structurally very different, and respond to treatment differently.

I believe most simply refer to them as "Bugs" though
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Old 06-30-2015, 06:27 AM   #28
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I believe most simply refer to them as "Bugs" though

You bet esp since the treatment is the same,

Get the water out of the tank!
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