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Old 11-25-2013, 06:01 AM   #41
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A glass boat chopped to pieces with a chainsaw can be glued back together virtually as strong or stronger if you like and the repair is done properly.

The hassle with chopping a hole in a GRP boat is that the hull flexes.

Even an inspected boat that is required to be overstrength by 400% will flex falling off a wave.

How to repair a skin and retain the same overall flexibility , not the same strength is the question.

Things break at hard spots , hence the dockside restriction .
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Old 11-25-2013, 06:15 AM   #42
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A glass boat chopped to pieces with a chainsaw can be glued back together virtually as strong or stronger if you like and the repair is done properly.

The hassle with chopping a hole in a GRP boat is that the hull flexes.

Even an inspected boat that is required to be overstrength by 400% will flex falling off a wave.

How to repair a skin and retain the same overall flexibility , not the same strength is the question.

Things break at hard spots , hence the dockside restriction .
So far I've never read of a restriction...

Though older...one of my fiberglass repair books uses a USCG small boat as an example of a fairly major hull repair.

I doubt owners would have it done and yard owners recommend it if it restricted their open ocean movements.

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"At their typical cruising speed of 10 knots, they have doubled their fuel mileage!"
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Old 02-26-2015, 04:12 PM   #43
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Update

We are taking the Hatteras 61 back to the Bahamas from New Orleans this summer. No re power yet, but we did a back-to-back test where we ran with one engine at 8kts with and without the dragging prop installed.

The difference in fuel burn was almost 20% After that test we went ahead with the feathering prop idea.

The attached photo shows the 32inch Max Prop installed. This prop could be used on either side, so the overall engine hours can be kept similar.

During the trip this summer we will probably go through over 2000gal of fuel; much of it at Bahamas prices. While the payback won't be from one trip, the fuel savings along with savings from decreased maintenance on the "get-home" engine side will add up.

Sorry the picture did not load right side up.
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Old 02-26-2015, 05:36 PM   #44
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Here you go
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Good looking prop porn
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Old 02-26-2015, 08:05 PM   #45
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Wouldn't that be sweet!! Twin feathering props. . . Wow

I know they're pretty popular in Europe and a little expensive for my tastes!! But one can dream. . . .
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Old 02-27-2015, 01:55 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neworleansrich View Post
We are taking the Hatteras 61 back to the Bahamas from New Orleans this summer. No re power yet, but we did a back-to-back test where we ran with one engine at 8kts with and without the dragging prop installed.

The difference in fuel burn was almost 20% After that test we went ahead with the feathering prop idea.

The attached photo shows the 32inch Max Prop installed. This prop could be used on either side, so the overall engine hours can be kept similar.

During the trip this summer we will probably go through over 2000gal of fuel; much of it at Bahamas prices. While the payback won't be from one trip, the fuel savings along with savings from decreased maintenance on the "get-home" engine side will add up.

Sorry the picture did not load right side up.
Wow! So what does a 32" max prop cost?
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Old 02-27-2015, 07:13 AM   #47
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Most of the folding feathering props are made for sail boats.

So the design consideration is lowest drag under sail .

The only feathering prop I know of is the LUKE made in Maine that is an 80 year old design created for Motor Sailors where motor propulsion efficiency was the key.

LUKE is still in business ,,, just a google away.
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Old 02-27-2015, 10:34 AM   #48
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With access to the to interior hull the repair of a cutout should not be a big deal. What I don't understand is how that would be done with fuel tanks which would normally obstruct side or bottom access. Seem everything would have to be done from outside????
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Old 02-27-2015, 12:55 PM   #49
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"With access to the to interior hull the repair of a cutout should not be a big deal."

On a metal boat it would not be , but on GRP it would be a nightmare!

The taper required is 6-1 to 12-1 and the lay up would require extrodinary care and skill., temperature and humidity control and probably vacuum bagging to assure a solid job.

Both inner and outer skin would require the same care , and there is NO WAY to assure the job was proper.
X ray , heat signature even drilling a core sample has errors.

Perhaps in a few years with more plastic commercial aircraft , repairing to a standard will be more frequent , and possibly it will slide down to a boat yard
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Old 02-27-2015, 01:20 PM   #50
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I have a 1985 Chris Craft with 6V92 engines. What I plan to do for long range cruise is add one or two 200 Gal fuel bladders and keep the engine running at hull speed.

These engines can run forever and the Hatteras is a beautiful boat.

Have fun in your crossing ! you will have an awesome time (guarantee)
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Old 02-27-2015, 05:57 PM   #51
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What I plan to do for long range cruise is add one or two 200 Gal fuel bladders and keep the engine running at hull speed
Years ago, my brother & I were taking a 42' sport fisher to the Sea of Cortez. The boat only had a total of 500 gals in her tanks so we added two Coke syrup barrels, one in each corner of the cockpit, secured by straps to the inside cleats. Since the fuel fillers were just forward of the cockpit, all we had to do was have a hose long enough to reach the fillers from the barrels. With a hand pump, it was duck soup to top off the tanks when they were down.
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Old 02-27-2015, 11:26 PM   #52
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Having had a feathering prop on a (not very fast) sailboat used for racing ,it was noticeably less effective than the conventional prop, maybe even less so in reverse. But as a get home or manoevering prop on the rested engine, it should be adequate. Bet the prop swaps get fast with practice.
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Old 02-28-2015, 02:58 AM   #53
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The max prop on Bay Pelican's wing engine is terrific in reverse with more prop walk to port then the main engine's prop walk to starboard.
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Old 02-28-2015, 06:11 AM   #54
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I guess it depends on what feathering prop you have. I had an Auto Prop on my 40 ft sailboat and it was way more effective than the fixed prop. For the same RPM and conditions I picked up at least .5 to .75 knots. Had much better push for getting though seas in the pass with considerably less RPM. In reverse it was way better than the fixed as far as thrust. A little less prop wash. The only issue was that it was very expensive.
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Old 02-28-2015, 07:46 AM   #55
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For those that want an EGT gauge priced in 1/10 of boat bucks.

Have used these and they are both digital and analog.

Best is common wire can be used from the probe to the gauge , not some special factory cut to length EGT wire.

GlowShift | White MaxTow Double Vision Diesel 1500 Pyrometer Gauge with Thermocouple EGT Probe
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Old 02-28-2015, 02:09 PM   #56
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Wouldn't that be sweet!! Twin feathering props. . . Wow

I know they're pretty popular in Europe and a little expensive for my tastes!! But one can dream. . . .
I think he's only getting one feathering prop.
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Old 02-28-2015, 02:16 PM   #57
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"With access to the to interior hull the repair of a cutout should not be a big deal."

On a metal boat it would not be , but on GRP it would be a nightmare!
It's a bit of a messy job. But hardly a nightmare. Jobs like and similar to that are done here in Lauderdale on a pretty regular basis by quite a number of boatyards.
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Old 02-28-2015, 03:34 PM   #58
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I'm surprised those engines couldn't be extracted from inside the boat. Might have to come out in pieces, and might take some surgery of interior walls and decks, but those double doors at the back of the salon look pretty wide from photos. A bare Detroit V block isn't all that wide when turned 90 degrees. Hmmm.
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Old 03-01-2015, 07:05 AM   #59
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I'm surprised those engines couldn't be extracted from inside the boat.

Taking an old engine to pieces to deep 6 it is not the problem.

Taking the NEW engine to pieces will require big buck labor to put it together and keep a warrente.
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:05 AM   #60
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I'm surprised those engines couldn't be extracted from inside the boat.

Taking an old engine to pieces to deep 6 it is not the problem.

Taking the NEW engine to pieces will require big buck labor to put it together and keep a warrente.
What warranty? I'd never repower with a new engine(s). Secondly, the premise in this instance was to run the boat at reduced speeds/power, so the replacement engines would be in a much, much smaller package....probably fit through the hole for the stripped V12 block. If not, make the hole slightly bigger. Chopping a hole in the hull is crazy.

I've actually looked quite closely at repowering a stabilized Hatteras yachtfish or cockpit motoryacht with one mid sized turbo six...say in the 350-400 HP range... driving the two existing transmissions through a splitter gearbox (or a splitter chain drive box from Ramsey Silent Chain). The engine room in those bigger Hatts is begging for that set up. Spectacular stabilized coastal cruiser and live aboard for reasonable money. If you wanna go slow...do it in style.
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