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Old 06-16-2012, 07:36 AM   #81
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My boat before this one was a 34' Mainship Pilot model. It was a single 370hp Yanmar diesel with a bow thruster. It could easily cruise a 16-17 knots at about 2 mpg. It was great for a cruising couple or a couple with small kids. The jump seats in the cockpit would make two single berths.

She handled well, and was comfortable. What we didn't like about it was the wet head (no stall shower), and little space for another couple along. The speed was good, and I loved the keel and skeg underneath.

Lobster style boats usually have a fine entry that is great in head seas. The square transom and flat aft sections can make them a handful in following seas. The keel does add directional stability, but don't get it perpendicular to the current in a tight situation.

All in all a great boat.
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Old 06-16-2012, 12:19 PM   #82
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While Tollycrafts are very well made boats and are excellent values for the type of people who like that kind of design, they are pretty much right at the bottom of the list of boats we would ever consider were we to decide to replace our current boat. In addition to quality and configuration, aesthetics are a significant factor in determining what we like, and Tolly's don't have any in our opinions.

The GB is miserably slow but it's built like a tank, and the 73-74 hull quality is something you simply don't get anymore in a production boat (thanks to the guy who built them).
Marin – Thank you for reply to my suggestion for assisting your faster-craft wishes. GB aesthetics look stodgy to us - In Our Opinion!

With no speaking between you and I it would be interesting to place our boats berth to berth with an hour of you getting on my Tolly for inspection and me on your GB for inspection. Then we could silently pass each other (with a nod if we liked to) on main dock and board our own boats for prompt departure – in different directions, of course. That exercise would give us at least a few months of intense forum banter as to whose boat is better built, or more comfortable, or portends best sea keeping abilities... and for what reasons.

The need for silence between you and I in person is self evident... as per interactions on most of our previous forum "debates".
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Old 06-16-2012, 12:58 PM   #83
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Marin – Thank you for reply to my suggestion for assisting your faster-craft wishes. GB aesthetics look stodgy to us - In Our Opinion!

With no speaking between you and I it would be interesting to place our boats berth to berth with an hour of you getting on my Tolly for inspection and me on your GB for inspection.
I think GBs are a bit stodgy, too. They are not our favorite design by any means. But it suits our purposes for now.

I've been on a number of Tollycraft boats over the years, from the 26 on up to models in the 40 foot range. Well-built boats, no question, and for people who like that kind of design they are an excellent choice. But none of their models have any appeal to us and we would never consider buying one. When we began thinking that a larger boat might be nice to have for exploring the area by water that we had been exploring by floatplane for many years we started looking at boats in a casual way. We were drawn to several basic designs and styles but the "cabin cruiser" boats like Tollycraft, Uniflite, and Bayliner were not among them.
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Old 06-16-2012, 01:41 PM   #84
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I think GBs are a bit stodgy, too. They are not our favorite design by any means. But it suits our purposes for now.

I've been on a number of Tollycraft boats over the years, from the 26 on up to models in the 40 foot range. Well-built boats, no question, and for people who like that kind of design they are an excellent choice. But none of their models have any aopeal to us and we would never consider buying one. When we began thinking that a larger boat might be nice to have for exploring the area by water that we had been exploring by floatplane for many years we started looking at boats in a casual way. We were drawn to several basic designs and styles but the "cabin cruiser" boats like Tollycraft, Uniflite, and Bayliner were not among them.
I have been aboard GB's... starting in 1960's as teenager in NY, during my 20's around Camden/Rockport/Rockland Maine, and on into current days on west coast. Very well put together craft. A Legend in Their Own Time... But, not my cup o' tea!

Upon running across Tolly's I became affixed to their build-quality, living comfort, hull design for sea keeping as well as speed, and ease of maintenance. We "The Clan" of Tolly owners are a tight bunch with ready assistance/discussion to one another. From what I can tell GB owners are Clan like too!

Bottom line: Boating is fun! No matter what good quality boat may be chosen to ply the waters.
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Old 06-16-2012, 02:03 PM   #85
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From what I can tell GB owners are Clan like too!
I wouldn't know. There is the GB owners forum which is a very good technical resource because of the shipwrights and ex-shipwrights and yard owners who participate in it. And I believe there may be GB get-togethers from time to time in various places. We have met a few other GB owners over the years but so far as I could tell they do their own thing independently of anyone else, same as we do. But there may be GB owners clubs and such. We aren't interested in that sort of thing so if they do exist we wouldn't know about it.
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Old 06-16-2012, 02:08 PM   #86
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Without meaning to take this off-topic, what is with the "fuel crisis" label?

We are not in a fuel crisis. A crisis is when there is no fuel to be had and no alternatives available.

We are settling into the new reality in which fuel is abundant but less and less affordable to a growing number of consumers.
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Old 06-16-2012, 02:15 PM   #87
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Without meaning to take this off-topic, what is with the "fuel crisis" label?
I agree there is no supply crisis but if you go back to the original post that started this from Ken Buck in 2008 he's wondering how the then-rapidly-escalating fuel prices would affect boat buying trends and new boat design. I suppose the then-rapidly rising fuel prices could have been interpreted as a "crisis" in terms of what it could do to the cost of boating, particularly the cost of operating the big, plowing, fuel guzzlers.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:27 PM   #88
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My boat's prettier than your boat .

In boats like most everything else, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Unfortunately the laws of physics apply universally. It takes power to plane and it takes money to provide that power. For most of us, time and money are a balancing challenge.


When we bought our boat 8 years ago I knew we'd only have three day weekends and the annual two week vacations. That's why we chose a trailerable boat that cruises at 25 kts. Unfortunately, there is no slower pace as it suck huge amounts of fuel when its plowing at 15 kts. and it zig zags at hull speed.

As I near retirement when time will be available for months long voyages we are shopping for a larger boat which will provide more space and comfort. With more time available we won't have the need for speed. However, I can relate to Marin's comments about watching paint dry so we are looking for a boat that will give a fair turn of speed when desired but also be comfortable and affordable at slower speeds. In the log yards of Puget Sound, I won't be unhappy to slow down a little and back off the tension.


As far as aesthetics, I tend to be drawn like Art is to the Tollycrafts. And, I'm glad I won't have to compete with Marin's wallet to get one.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:42 PM   #89
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As far as aesthetics, I tend to be drawn like Art is to the Tollycrafts. And, I'm glad I won't have to compete with Marin's wallet to get one.
No worries there. At this point if we decide to do anything we are inclined to have our boat completely overhauled and repowered as opposed to buying a newer or larger one. While the cost could be applied to a newer GB (or similar boat) we know what we have with this one and we put a lot of value on the 1973 hull which by many accounts is the best fiberglass hull (along with the early 74s) American Marine/Grand Banks ever built.

However there are boat designs we prefer, specifically pilothouse (hence the Fleming) and the Europa configuration of GBs. But given all the other things we have earmarked to do in the near future it may not make sense to change to a different boat with all the new problems to be fixed, greater moorage and insurance costs, and so on that would come with it. Time will tell. But the one thing I can say with absolute certainty is there is no Tollycraft in our future.
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:58 PM   #90
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Many boats have the appearance of a plastic Clorox jug. ... Unlike those jugs, I find the appearance of GBs to be appealing. But that's me.
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Old 06-17-2012, 10:26 AM   #91
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we put a lot of value on the 1973 hull which by many accounts is the best fiberglass hull (along with the early 74s) American Marine/Grand Banks ever built.
What makes these two yrs special? Hull layup, or design? Are any of the GBs a displacement hull in the 36-42' sizes?

Since everyone else is throwing out "I wants".....I'd like a 42 Kadey Krogen with single forward stateroom with centerline berth (like the new 39s), solid glass hull, NO exterior teak, forward angled front windows with an overhang, bow thruster, NA 6B Cummins in a stand-up ER, and paravanes. If this could somehow be built with a Nordhavn height bow that would be great. A Nordhavn would meet nearly all of my wants but there was just something about the interior space on the Nordhavns I've checked out that my wife and I both just didn't care for at all, and neither of us could voice why. Santa are ya listening, I've been an , really I have!
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Old 06-17-2012, 10:47 AM   #92
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What makes these two yrs special? Hull layup, or design? Are any of the GBs a displacement hull in the 36-42' sizes?

Since everyone else is throwing out "I wants".....I'd like a 42 Kadey Krogen with single forward stateroom with centerline berth (like the new 39s), solid glass hull, NO exterior teak, forward angled front windows with an overhang, bow thruster, NA 6B Cummins in a stand-up ER, and paravanes. If this could somehow be built with a Nordhavn height bow that would be great. A Nordhavn would meet nearly all of my wants but there was just something about the interior space on the Nordhavns I've checked out that my wife and I both just didn't care for at all, and neither of us could voice why. Santa are ya listenin I've been an , really I have!
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Old 06-17-2012, 11:48 AM   #93
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What makes these two yrs special? Hull layup, or design? Are any of the GBs a displacement hull in the 36-42' sizes?
The original molds for the GB36 and GB42 were designed and built by Howard Abbey, one of the foremost pioneers in big-boat fiberglass hull construction in the early 1970s. Abbey also helped Hatteras get started in fiberglass. From mid-1973 when the GB36 and 42 were switched from wood to fiberglass in the American Marine yard in Singapore until mid-1974 when Abbey left the company, he oversaw the layup of every GB hull. A "Howard Abbey" hull is laid up better than any of the hulls following his departure. Not that the later hulls are bad although American Marine experienced a lot of production problems with hulls over the following years and twice brought Abbey back to straighten things out. But the Abbey hulls are extremely well built.

Until recently, all Grand Banks hulls in all models from 32' to 52' use the same Kenneth Smith semi-planing design he created for the Grand Banks prototype, Spray in the early 1960s. The most recent GB models use new hull designs that, while still semi-planing, are designed for much more speed.
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Old 06-17-2012, 11:51 AM   #94
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Funny story about a 41 AT. Back when these first came out, we were at the Ft. L'dale Trawler Fest and they had one of these and the next size down. We fell head over heals in love with the 41'er. 3 small problems, 1. not a full dispacement hull, 2. nearly 4 or 5 hundred HP (I forget which), 3. $$$$$$$!
These two had quite a few people waiting to go aboard when we arrived, so we toured the rest of the offerings that appealed to us. By the time we were ready to leave the crowds around the ATs had dissipated, so we boarded the 39? and our minds went on daydream overdrive. But when we got on the 41!!!! WOW. so after all day touring boats in the heat and having boarded something approaching nirvana and being in socks only, and my head on a swivel, I missed the last step coming off the flybridge and somehow managed to jam my right middle toe on the deck and promptly broke it! That made the next week and a half at work a joy, NOT.
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Old 06-17-2012, 12:35 PM   #95
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Until recently, all Grand Banks hulls in all models from 32' to 52' use the same Kenneth Smith semi-planing design he created for the Grand Banks prototype, Spray in the early 1960s. The most recent GB models use new hull designs that, while still semi-planing, are designed for much more speed.[/QUOTE]

Marin, looks like a planing hull to me. 25 knots

Grand Banks Yachts - 43 Heritage EU Overview
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Old 06-17-2012, 12:44 PM   #96
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looks like a planing hull to me. 25 knots
I'm curious to see a fuel consumption chart for that express cruiser.
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Old 06-17-2012, 01:13 PM   #97
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I'm curious to see a fuel consumption chart for that express cruiser.
Mark, here is the chart for Moonstruck's 500 hp Yanmar engines. Since there are two engines the fuel consumption can be doubled. In use the figures work out amazingly close to the charts. We will cruise at up to 25-2600 rpm. That gives 26-27 knots which is about 30mph. That gives a fuel burn of about 1 statute mpg. I would think the Grand Banks would be somewhat similar. However, they are turning those engines up pretty good.

http://goldcoastpower.com/db/photos/86872-6.pdf
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Old 06-17-2012, 02:05 PM   #98
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That gives a fuel burn of about 1 statute mpg. I would think the Grand Banks would be somewhat similar.
That's about $100 an hour. I'm not that much in a hurry. Confirms why I chose a trawler. My friends' eyebrows rise high enough when I tell them the Coot's fill-up costs $1200 (for a 1500-mile range).
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Old 06-17-2012, 02:26 PM   #99
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[QUOTE=markpierce;90973]That's about $100 an hour. I'm not that much in a hurry. Confirms why I chose a trawler. My friends' eyebrows rise high enough when I tell them the Coot's fill-up costs $1200 (for a 1500-mile range).[/QUOTE

That is about right although for the last 2 weeks or more we have been cruising at a fuel burn not so much more than your boat. With about 10 to 15 miles between islands we are towing the dinghy at about 7-8 knots. When we start back it will be 165 NM in one day. That calls for speed.

I had a trawler style boat similar in size to yours. We burned about 1.75 gal/hr. It was great, but I was limited in where I could go in the time alloted. The 34' express boat I had was a good compromise at 16-17 knots at about 2 statute miles per gallon, but its size was limiting.

Now, we have had this for about 7 years. We go where we want at higher speeds then slow down to smell the roses.

It's all a compromise.

A little anecdote----When I had the trawler there was a house boat on the dock powered by 2 big Crusader gas engines. It seldom left the dock because of fuel burn. He was always asking, "now, how fast does your trawler cruise". One day my answer was, "about 7-8 knots faster than your boat". You could say that about many boats probably in your marina.

The dock boys will often say, "Moonstruck is no dock queen". They know that when we get to the boat we usually have a destination in mind, and go.

I still think about a larger, slower boat. In fact I was just perusing a 53' Selene. Tempting, but a whole lot of boat to maintain. Right now, we are happy with Moonstruck-----but not Xantrex. That is for another thread.
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Old 06-17-2012, 02:28 PM   #100
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Marin, looks like a planing hull to me. 25 knots
Not with that small keel and deep V bottom. It goes 25 knots because it has some 900 horsepower.
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