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Old 04-18-2008, 10:42 AM   #21
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

AdamT: Welcome to the world of "reality & honesty." As I stated in past posts, it only took me about 12 years and 8 boats to admit to the actual "reality" of my boating mission. I initially saw myself making long passages, having numerous people on board, at anchor for days at a time, etc. I started with a 48' Offshore Yachtfisher, went up to a 54' Sportfisher,* and as "reality" crept in (wisdom) I migrated down in size and speed and am presently driving a 32' Trawler.

Since I single hand 99% of the time and almost never stray more than 70 miles from my slip, this boat services the actual mission of my boating almost perfectly.

Your class A, B or C states the problem beautifully!

Walt
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Old 04-18-2008, 02:21 PM   #22
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

Reality will rapidly become more real to most boaters and potential boaters as fuel prices continue to climb, moorage fees go up, insurance goes up, etc.

We initially thought in terms of a GB46 when we started thinking about acquiring a boat to cruise our waters but the cost finally ruled that out--- we have other hobbies that cost as much as boating. So we decided to look for an older GB36. Now, ten years later, we would not want a boat one inch longer. We're not going to do open ocean cruising (even if our insurance company permitted it), and the maximum number of additional people we will take on the boat is two, and that very rarely.

We've been in our marina long enough and have met enough people to begin to see trends. We've noticed that a lot of people new to boating--- and who*have the money--- tend to start out in big boats, 45 feet and up in the case of power boats. But it's been interesting to see that a lot of people who have been in boating a long time are leaning more and more toward smaller boats-- 28' to 40'-- than what they have had previously. When we first bought our boat the trend at the GB dealer in our marina was people selling their smaller GBs to buy bigger ones. Now the trend seems to have reversed a bit, with more and more people selling their large boats to get smaller ones.

Not tiny ones--- they still want a boat that will serve their needs---- but smaller ones nevertheless. There still seems to be plenty of people who want that big GB or Selene or whatever. But the ones I've talked to are usually fairly new to boating, and have dreams of powering their floating, all-electric, pushbutton condominum to Hawaii or Mexico or something. Some of them undoubtedly will do this. But it will be interesting to see over the next few years if the downsizing trend continues, accelerates, or goes away.

-- Edited by Marin at 15:22, 2008-04-18
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Old 04-18-2008, 07:00 PM   #23
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

Sloboat---

The prices of the large boats for sale don't seem to represent a glut. A late-90s GB52 in our marina just sold for about $1.3 million. There is an older 60-foot Willard for sale in our marina for $600,000-plus. And there are people willing to pay these prices. So whatever "glut" there may be seems to be getting snapped up by the folks with money. It's interesting how many people who have had larger boats are now looking to get smaller ones, but from what I've seen in our marina so far, they're having no problems selling their large ones.
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Old 04-19-2008, 04:15 AM   #24
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

The folks that want big huge apartment sized boats , are seldom strapped for ca$h.

So with the few hours a year spent away from the dock (remember everyone is watching when you come back) fuel is perhaps .5% of the ownership costs.

They probably spend more on soap to have the thing washed.
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Old 04-19-2008, 06:11 PM   #25
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

Sloboat,
The deals on big boats may be regional- much like housing markets. Punta Gorda and much of Florida has seen a lot of personal net worth dry up due to market correction. These areas may be an area to shop for a better deal. Good news is- you can move that 60 footer most anywhere you like. Unlike a house!!
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Old 04-20-2008, 04:18 AM   #26
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

Florida Mariner , is the place to look for deals, online or sent to you.

Good Hunting ,
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Old 04-29-2008, 03:43 AM   #27
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

From my perspective as a broker, I do not see much of a "buyers market" out there. I've bought 4 boats for customers in the Ft. Myrs area this year and sellers are holding tight on their prices so far. Most boat owners do not have to sell and most will just keep their boats if they cannot get what they want for them.

I will say, however, that the trawler market is tighter than ever. If you have a good, well maintained boat and wish to sell, you can expect to get top dollar for it. I'm working a deal now on a very nice Albin and the seller took less than 9k less than he paid for it 9 years ago. I'd say he he did pretty good on that.

And I think the rising fuel prices will make trawlers even more desirable.
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Old 05-01-2008, 09:52 AM   #28
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

The glut, if there will be one, will be the same one we always see. First : Poorly maintained off brand boats. Second: Fuel guzzlers with the wrong engines - think 40' Searay with Cat 3116s. As has been oft stated, for a good trawler with economical engine(s) there will always be a market. Fuel costs for this good trawler, who cares! Fun factor counts far more.
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Old 05-02-2008, 06:28 AM   #29
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

The Hats with outsized engines (like a 40 ft with 8V71's) will be hard to keep in fuel.

Only problem is with their plaining hull , there not very efficient off the plane , even if refitted with rational engines.

But there getting pretty cheap.

I think the author of this thread was dreaming of a cheapo 65 ft roomaran dirt cheap.

Since the roomaraNS DONT LEAVE THE DOCK ANYWAY , THE FUEL COST IS NON EXISTANT

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Old 05-03-2008, 10:16 AM   #30
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

I am originally from the UK and used a PC based software package called Sea Pro from EuroNAV.

http://www.euronav.co.uk/Products/Le.../seaProStd.htm

They have an excellent passage planning feature for entering a route, and speed of vessel and it will calculate passage time, expected ground track, course to steer and best departure time. All of which can be displayed graphically. Unfortunately their North American support isn't great so I'm wary of using it over here. I wish I could find a program for Canada/US that was is as good
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Old 05-03-2008, 10:26 AM   #31
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

Sorry I'm new here. This reply was intended to a much earlier post by Chris Foster
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Old 05-03-2008, 11:52 AM   #32
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

No sweat, Martin. Welcome aboard!!!
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Old 05-04-2008, 05:14 AM   #33
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

Folks looking for a roomaran should consider an ex work boat.

Cheap and big.

www.oceanmarine.com lists a 100ft crew boat cert for 149pax for $285K.

Should have a roomy feeling aboard.

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Old 05-04-2008, 08:32 AM   #34
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

Yup... quite roomy. Well just toss you a line and you can tow us around, since we won't be able to find anyplace to dock it.
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Old 05-05-2008, 04:43 AM   #35
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

"Well just toss you a line and you can tow us around, "

Not Me , I learned bigger is Never better, if I want that much room a house is more suitable.

Our current boat is a 50 Uniflite , but a custom 39ft er is slowly in the works.

Comfort , safety , stability or cruse ability are NOT size related.

Only if you have a desperate need to go Bowling underway , is a big roomaran useful.

My boats* never require a dock for anything but dink access to a resturant at times , for She who Must be Obeyed!

Its all in the design and outfitting , systems selected, and operating techniques.

FF

-- Edited by FF at 05:47, 2008-05-05
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Old 05-05-2008, 09:03 AM   #36
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RE: Fuel Crisis boat trend

FF wrote: "Comfort, safety, stability or cruise ability are NOT size related."

At 67 years old and having 8 boats in the last 15 years, I have found that the above statement is absolutely TRUE! You must interpret each word in that statement LITERALLY. My largest boat was a 54' Sport Fisher. My BEST boat is a 32' Trawler.
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Old 06-14-2012, 01:46 AM   #37
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I am looking for a diesel survey and pressure test for leaks on tanks in the Santa Cruz area. Anybody have any referals?
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Old 06-14-2012, 02:01 AM   #38
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Personally I think the trend of boats with larger engines will continue.

That because if you can afford a new boat you probably work very hard and don't have the time to go anywhere in a slow boat.

At least you don't THINK you have the time.

Those same boats will probably for the most part be driven at hull speeds mostly because boats are generally less comfortable up on plane. Also because it only takes a few $1500 fuel bill weekends to tame all but the richest new captains

My Bayliner 4788 ( to the OP) can cruise at 15 knots, but in any kind of sea, the boat is not as comfortable. The movement is sharper, more like a speedboat, less like a comfortable yacht. It is also expensive to cruise at .7 NMPG when you can have the ability to cruise at 1.5 NMPG and be more comfortable.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:35 PM   #39
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With the emphasis on "think" above Kevin... I believe most people perceive that they do not have the time to slow down.

I have recently felt more compelled to believe that true wealth is being able to afford the extra time. An extra day or more away from work? Not a problem... I can afford it.

That logic allows me to 'afford' to run at trawler speeds. I still get there the same day a planing boat does, but I arrive with more money in my pocket.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:41 PM   #40
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On a trip if kids are on board they get board fast nothing to do at 7 knts.

Me I love a slow boat ride. Just cruising and looking.

I always fish on the high and low tides so every 6 hours or so. If I miss the low I just fish the high.

The young have no time to waste.

sd
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