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Old 06-15-2016, 12:50 PM   #21
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At idle should not be a problem, even 1/2 inch hose keeps up with many smaller engines.
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Old 06-15-2016, 01:51 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by tadhana View Post
Most of these flush systems are set up for a 5/8 inch garden hose. I don't think a 5/8 hose could pass enough water Most sea water intake hoses are wire reinforced so that it won't collapse under suction. Do you think a 5/8 hose would stay open under suction?
I wouldn't use garden hose in a suction application but there are suction rated hoses available in 5/8".

Since most of these systems have female garden hose fittings to screw the hose into, you could go up to 3/4" hose for the suction hose.

Those that have the Groco Flush System pictured above mounted on the Seacock don't even need a hose. Just pull the plug out and shut the seacock once the water has risen above the flush fitting. This allows the system to move the maximum amount of water. As you point out, using 5/8" hose will reduce the water your engine pump could move.

The engine on my boat has an 1-1/4" seawater pump. I've installed a Tee and Ball Valve at the entrance to the strainer. I have an 1-1/4" pick up hose that leads down from the valve to the bilge. My plan is to open the valve and close the seacock if I have a flooding emergency my electric pumps can't stay ahead of.

After reading this thread, I'm going to give some thought to how I could use this as a fresh water flushing system. I guess I could just turn off the electric pumps, fill the bilge with fresh water and go from there. Actually that would be pretty easy.
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Old 06-15-2016, 04:18 PM   #23
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I drilled and tapped the cover of my Perko strainer and attached a street el and fittings for a garden hose. See the pic below.

My Yanmar 6LY will suck a garden hose nearly flat with the seacock closed even at idle, but that is what I use and it works ok.

When I am finished flushing I close the fresh water supply and quickly shut down the engine.

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Old 06-15-2016, 04:25 PM   #24
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Be careful about the metals. The street el and nipple are probably brass if you bought them at the hardware store. Unless you ordered them in bronze from a marine distributor, they are probably brass. You cannot tell by color alone. There are some brass castings that look like bronze. In my years running boatyards, I have seen brass fitting sink boats. Apollo makes valves in both brass and bronze. it is hard to tell them apart.
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Old 06-15-2016, 04:48 PM   #25
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Another issue that I would never have thought was an issue. Here in Georgia Strait, I have never encountered anyone doing a fresh water flush on an inboard engine. Lots of folks with outboards do it, I even did it with an outdrive when I had one, but never on an inboard.
My first sailboat had a Ynamar YSE12, raw water cooled. I know I never flushed it in the 11 years I owned it. I ran across it when it was 30 yrs old and the then current owner had just repowered. Not due to lack of flushing. He was a Yanmar dealer's employee, so had good access to new engines, and told me he looked at the old one critically after he replaced it. His take on it was that it had gone 30 years and would likely go another 30.

I know there are other reasons to prefer to see fresh water in your heat exchangers, but paying attention to the rate of consumption of the zincs will address most of that. You still need to pay attention to zincs if you do adopt a flushing regime.

Just doesn't cry out to me as another thing I need to start doing.
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Old 06-15-2016, 05:22 PM   #26
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Some engines have 7-8 zincs, and some have none. My Cummins has 3 zincs. Two in the aftercooler and one in the heat exchanger. There is no zinc in the fuel cooler or the transmission cooler. they are a very long distance from the engine zincs and could not be protected, so I prefer to flush if the engine is going to sit for a month or so in salt water. My Onan generator has no zincs, so it gets flushed if it is gong to sit for a week. Remember older engines such as your raw water cooled Yanmar are principally iron and steel. Modern engines have iron, steel, brass, bronze, aluminum and stainless steel. To me it makes sense to flush the salt out if it is going to sit. As an aside, here on the Chesapeake the water is brackish and engine zincs last 200 hours. In Florida they only last 100 hours.
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Old 06-15-2016, 06:19 PM   #27
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Greetings,
Interesting that the subject of zincs came up. IF you flush with fresh water, won't your zincs develop an inert oxide coating as a result of sitting in fresh water thus rendering them useless?
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Old 06-15-2016, 06:32 PM   #28
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No they do not seem to develop an oxide coating that renders them useless; they continue to function. I do use aluminum anodes on the hull becasue I spend a fair amount of the year in brackish to fresh water.
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Old 06-15-2016, 06:40 PM   #29
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zincs really have nothing to do with fresh water flush or not. Anodes protect against galvanic corrosion which is different than aqueous corrosion.

The primary issue is for those of us with aftercoolers and heat exchangers. In a salt water environment, many manufacturers recommend a service every two years. Most of the time this doesn't get done. It can be expensive to have done unless you do the work yourself. If a core rust out, then they are very expensive to replace. Regular fresh water flushing helps reduce the service interval and the risk of rust. It is much better to have these items sit in fresh water than sit in salt water.

How much better is something that I don't know. Most of the time we only get to hear anecdotal reports of folks who have or have not used fresh water flush. My take is that if it can be setup relatively inexpensively and in such as way as to make it relatively quick and easy, then it is good idea. How easily, and how inexpensively depend largely on the boat however.
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Old 06-15-2016, 06:43 PM   #30
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Greetings,
Interesting that the subject of zincs came up. IF you flush with fresh water, won't your zincs develop an inert oxide coating as a result of sitting in fresh water thus rendering them useless?
This is something that I have wondered myself. As far as I have been able to find out, the zincs do continue to function. However, I have considered switching to aluminum anodes in my heat exchanger and aftercooler if I come up with a fresh water system. Their would be no concern then with passivization of a zinc anode while sitting in fresh water.
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Old 06-15-2016, 07:21 PM   #31
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As far as i know there are no aluminum engine pencil anodes available. Also there are no Vetus bow thruster aluminum anodes either. Vetus tells me, and my experience over 3 seasons confirms that a zinc anode on the bow thruster does not seem to have any effect on the aluminum hull and shaft anodes and vice versa. Cummins tells me that the zinc pencil anodes are essentially in a separate electrolyte solution and are not affected by the hull annodes
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Old 06-15-2016, 08:56 PM   #32
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As far as i know there are no aluminum engine pencil anodes available. Also there are no Vetus bow thruster aluminum anodes either. Vetus tells me, and my experience over 3 seasons confirms that a zinc anode on the bow thruster does not seem to have any effect on the aluminum hull and shaft anodes and vice versa. Cummins tells me that the zinc pencil anodes are essentially in a separate electrolyte solution and are not affected by the hull annodes
Pretty sure there are aluminum pencil zincs

Pencil Zinc replacement Aluminum Pencil Anodes, Navalloy, Secure Core,

Engine PencilZincs

LarryM has been using them for a while I think....

While true they are in a different solution doesn't mean that going to aluminum isn't better depending on your cruising waters...just that mixing them isn't too big of a deal.
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Old 06-15-2016, 09:43 PM   #33
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As I've say ,with being at the dock for months,in salt water here in marathon,i will flush with city water and hope that I can extend the life of the raw water components and accessories as they are the most important and are harder the access without a lot of research and money. This is my best practice and hopefully it will be be the best I could of done for my 30 years old Perkins. I've done the repairs and upkeep . Maybe the best thing I've done .!!
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Old 06-15-2016, 09:49 PM   #34
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And then you call a broker asking about a boat and find out 1 engine is fresh water cooled and the other is RAW water cooled. What?? These are gas engines but it's kept in saltwater. What was the owner thinking? Don't think flushing will help.
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Old 06-15-2016, 09:57 PM   #35
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Freshwater side failed. Cost to much for the owner and his top shelf mechanic said I can get you going again for $$$$.
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Old 06-15-2016, 10:06 PM   #36
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Actually the older engine is raw and the new one is fresh water cooled. But you're probably right, he replaced one that went bad and did that one right. But the other one? Time bomb just ticking....
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Old 06-15-2016, 11:41 PM   #37
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Most of these flush systems are set up for a 5/8 inch garden hose. I don't think a 5/8 hose could pass enough water Most sea water intake hoses are wire reinforced so that it won't collapse under suction. Do you think a 5/8 hose would stay open under suction?
No. Technically it would collapse if you pulled vacuum - aka - more gpm than the hose could provide. However, since I flush at idle (Yanmar 4LHA-STE), I find that my 1/2" hose keeps up just fine - and my static pressure isn't that high at the spigot. The hose just starts to get soft... so just above minimum. I keep my hand on the hose to monitor. I'll up size garden hoses if need be.
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Old 06-20-2016, 02:40 PM   #38
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Wouldn't a simpler way to control the flow be to just observe the water level/flow in the raw water strainer under normal operations and try to duplicate it while flushing? I haven't actually tried this, but wonder if others have.
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Old 06-20-2016, 04:20 PM   #39
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The strainer is full of water when the engine is running. To flush the engine you take the cap off the strainer and run a hose into the strainer. The engine will pick up a mixture of air and water but there is adequate water to keep the impeller wet and lubricated and more than enough to keep the engine cool for the minute or two that you are flushing it. On smaller engines you can take the hose off the sea strainer and but it into a bucket of water and run it off that,with a garden hose of fresh water running into the bucket.
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Old 06-20-2016, 09:01 PM   #40
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The strainer is full of water when the engine is running. To flush the engine you take the cap off the strainer and run a hose into the strainer. The engine will pick up a mixture of air and water but there is adequate water to keep the impeller wet and lubricated and more than enough to keep the engine cool for the minute or two that you are flushing it. On smaller engines you can take the hose off the sea strainer and but it into a bucket of water and run it off that,with a garden hose of fresh water running into the bucket.
Thanks, but I have flush fittings (see post 11); just haven't used them yet.
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