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Old 01-13-2013, 10:15 PM   #21
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Yea, what are the odds? Since you can't do an oil analysis on new oil that tells you anything, I'd insist on getting minimum of 20 hours on the engine, then test.
Well Sunday it left San Pedro in southern California for the islands for a couple of days so it likely will have a few hours on it before i get it surveyed
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Old 01-13-2013, 10:19 PM   #22
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I think the original Lehman WAS a tractor engine.
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Old 01-13-2013, 10:47 PM   #23
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I think the original Lehman WAS a tractor engine.
According to Marin,it started life as the Ford of England Dorset diesel, having less a success as a truck engine than as a standing or constant rpm engine.
I just sourced a fresh water pump assembly for my 2715E engine, it came from England but I can`t see a country of manufacture. The seller, Wagga Wagga (a rural town) Tractor, lists application to various farm machines, 3 headers, 2 tractors and 8 Ford trucks.
Clearly, a major use was ultimately marine. I`d like to hear from someone who has done high hours with one, but < 5000 seems to be the most.
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Old 01-13-2013, 11:11 PM   #24
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According to Marin,it started life as the Ford of England Dorset diesel, having less a success as a truck engine than as a standing or constant rpm engine.
I just sourced a fresh water pump assembly for my 2715E engine, it came from England but I can`t see a country of manufacture. The seller, Wagga Wagga (a rural town) Tractor, lists application to various farm machines, 3 headers, 2 tractors and 8 Ford trucks.
Clearly, a major use was ultimately marine. I`d like to hear from someone who has done high hours with one, but < 5000 seems to be the most.
me too. I've heard of 10,000 hours but none have been listed yet. My tractor engine was originally made in Enghland then they were made here in the USA from 1965 on
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Old 01-13-2013, 11:54 PM   #25
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You know what they say about old-generation British engines--- if they don't leak oil and smoke on startup there's something wrong with them.
they used to say that about Harleys as well. .....but i have notice a few seconds of smoke on start up
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Old 01-14-2013, 12:06 AM   #26
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1983 twin 120s with 4200 hrs. Documented routine maintenance, no apparent problems, no oil burn, minor smoke on start. 100 hour oil change with 15W-40 Delo oil, engines are run at least monthly. Maintenance per Lehman manual and Bomac suggestions including valve adjustments. Injectors to come out this spring for pop-test.
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:05 AM   #27
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Base engine for the FL120 is the Ford Dorset. Started as a truck engine, failed miserably, Ford almost took it out of production but tried it as a stationary industrial engine. Worked great at that and eventually found its way into agricultural applications, mostly combines but some tractors.

This engine was never manufactured in the US. The Ford Dorset engines were installed in Ford products that were made in the US but the engines themselves were made in England. Actually, all Ford diesel engines were made in England regardless of what country the vehicle or equipment the engines were installed in were made. This was the case for many years.

The later FL135 (or SP series of Lehman engines) was based on the Ford of England Dover engine. Very similar in physical layout to the Dorset but a completely different engine made in a different plant.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:27 AM   #28
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Mine manufactured in '73 has ~1500hrs. Normal smoke at start-up.

Says right on the manual:

Ford Industrial Engines and Power Units...

Manufactured in England by the Ford Motor Company Ltd.
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:58 AM   #29
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7581 hours and no issues on the FL SP135.
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Old 01-14-2013, 10:29 AM   #30
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7581 hours and no issues on the FL SP135.
you are top dog now with most hours...what rpm do you run at mostly?
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Old 01-14-2013, 10:32 AM   #31
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[QUOTE=bfloyd4445;126470...what rpm do you run at mostly?[/QUOTE]

1600 to 1800 rpms based on sea state.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:56 PM   #32
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1600 to 1800 rpms based on sea state.
Thanks. The reason for the question was i read at Bomac's website that they recomend cruising be done at 2000 to 2200 rpm which seemed high from what forum posters had indicated.
I'd like to see a torq curve on this engine

They also recomend replaceing the transmission oil cooler every two three years and to change the heat exchanger every five years. Do you do that? That should be a question for another thread huh?
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:59 PM   #33
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UOTE=Floyd;126553]Thanks. The reason for the question was i read at Bomac's website that they recommend cruising be done at 2000 to 2200 rpm which seemed high from what forum posters had indicated.
I'd like to see a torq curve on this engine

They also recommend replacing the transmission oil cooler every two three years and to change the heat exchanger every five years. Do you do that? That should be a question for another thread huh?[/QUOTE]

Floyd: Pretty much all the routine maintenance we do is based on hours not time. 2000 to 2200 rpms for cruising? What's the link for Bomac that has their recommendations?
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Old 01-14-2013, 07:18 PM   #34
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They also recomend replaceing the transmission oil cooler every two three years and to change the heat exchanger every five years. Do you do that? That should be a question for another thread huh?
The rpm band that is most suitable for the Dorset engine, according to people we know in the UK who spent a good part of their career servicing, repairing, and overhauling them is 1500-1800. This is why the engine was such a miserable failure as a truck engine. High rpm and constantly changing rpm under high loads killed it fast. And it's why the engine proved so good in relatively low load, constant rpm service like generators, cranes, pumps, and combines.

If you use the cupro-nickel oil and transmission heat exchangers, American Diesel recommends these be changed every 2,000 hours IIRC. The main heat exchanger should go a long, long time, at least if it's cupro nickel.

The main heat exchangers (curpro nickel) on our engines are the ones the engines were fitted with in 1973. The oil and transmission exchangers were all replaced by us during the first few years we had the boat.
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Old 01-15-2013, 02:13 PM   #35
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UOTE=Floyd;126553]Thanks. The reason for the question was i read at Bomac's website that they recommend cruising be done at 2000 to 2200 rpm which seemed high from what forum posters had indicated.
I'd like to see a torq curve on this engine

They also recommend replacing the transmission oil cooler every two three years and to change the heat exchanger every five years. Do you do that? That should be a question for another thread huh?
Floyd: Pretty much all the routine maintenance we do is based on hours not time. 2000 to 2200 rpms for cruising? What's the link for Bomac that has their recommendations?[/QUOTE]>>>

In the owners manual is lists the max rpm as 2500
Lehman 120 Operators Manual - Operation & Maintenance

Bomac's LF page
Bomac Marine- Ford Lehman Engines Parts, Remanufacture and Service

I can't find where i read 2000-2200 yesterday

another poster mentioned his engine gets hot at 2000rpm and the manual says thats caused by the wrong prop

Britt
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Old 01-15-2013, 03:30 PM   #36
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We cruise mostly at 1750-1850 range. Certainly nothing over 2000 for more than a few minutes to clear things out.
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Old 01-15-2013, 04:46 PM   #37
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Floyd: Pretty much all the routine maintenance we do is based on hours not time. 2000 to 2200 rpms for cruising? What's the link for Bomac that has their recommendations?
>>>

In the owners manual is lists the max rpm as 2500
Lehman 120 Operators Manual - Operation & Maintenance

We have the SP135 and WOT loaded is also 2500 rpms

Bomac's LF page
Bomac Marine- Ford Lehman Engines Parts, Remanufacture and Service

I have that link. BOMAC has given us good service in the past and they answer their emails.

I can't find where i read 2000-2200 yesterday


another poster mentioned his engine gets hot at 2000rpm and the manual says thats caused by the wrong prop

The wrong prop, could be but it could also be a cooling system issue.

Britt[/QUOTE]

Running at 2200 rpms gets us hull speed (~8.4 knots) plus we are burning about twice the fuel if we run at 1700 rpms/~7 knots. I think you'll find with most FL's, either the 120 or 135s, the operators run between 1600 - 1850 rpms.
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:17 PM   #38
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>>>

Britt
Running at 2200 rpms gets us hull speed (~8.4 knots) plus we are burning about twice the fuel if we run at 1700 rpms/~7 knots. I think you'll find with most FL's, either the 120 or 135s, the operators run between 1600 - 1850 rpms.[/QUOTE]

1.4knt increase dosent seem worth the effort to me and if you were trying to outrun a storm its not likely to make a diference

Thats what i had thought untill i read the 2-2200 as cruiseing rpm. My old Ford tractor is set at max 2000 and 1650 to 1800 is the recomended working rpm which makes sense.

The FL owners manual lists peak torq of 280 at 1600 and its been my experiance engines seem to rum very eficient at around this rpm.

But thanks for the info. I am learning lots about these engines and so far i havent seen any negatives with them
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:21 PM   #39
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We cruise mostly at 1750-1850 range. Certainly nothing over 2000 for more than a few minutes to clear things out.
do you ever use a fuel additive? I always use them in all my engines since they went to that new formulated diesel fuel. Engines run very clean with one of these aditives and they keep the upper valve train, injectors and pump better lubricated. One of the problems with the new fuel was that it didnt lubricate as well as the old disel fuel did causing wear in the engine, pump, injectors
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:19 PM   #40
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We have about 5,800 hours on our engines. We run about 1600-1650 rpm. That's good for 8-8.3 knots. The previous owners had most of the exhaust system replaced. We've not done any significant work on the engines. Regular maintenance and oil changes. No problems so far.

We have been using ValvTect fuel for the last couple of years and have not been using additional additives.
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