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Old 04-16-2012, 01:51 PM   #21
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Looking at a socket set at Lowes that claims to work both inch and metric sizes with one set of sockets. Anybody ever used one of those? The sockets have a series of round bars inside instead of being hex shaped or having twelve points.
Bob
Sounds like it would be a good idea to buy a couple pair of vice grips at the same time. Or maybe save the money on the super dooper sockets and just go directly to the vice grips. Sorry, but I've never found any shortcuts to using the right tools.
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:59 PM   #22
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Greetings,
I posted this comment (or I at least THOUGHT I did) either here or on another thread. Buy a proper set of SAE tools. The only additions necessary to work on a metric vehicle/apparatus are a 10mm and 17mm wrench/socket. I used to fix a friend's VW beetle and did just fine with tool assortment mentioned for 99.9% of tasks. Now socket head cap screws are a different matter.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:24 PM   #23
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Greetings,
I posted this comment (or I at least THOUGHT I did) either here or on another thread. Buy a proper set of SAE tools. The only additions necessary to work on a metric vehicle/apparatus are a 10mm and 17mm wrench/socket. I used to fix a friend's VW beetle and did just fine with tool assortment mentioned for 99.9% of tasks. Now socket head cap screws are a different matter.
The only thing missing in that assortment is the 36mm socket to remove the beetles flywheel.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:28 PM   #24
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Looking at a socket set at Lowes that claims to work both inch and metric sizes with one set of sockets. Anybody ever used one of those? The sockets have a series of round bars inside instead of being hex shaped or having twelve points.

Bob
I have tried, with limited success, to use those socket on a few rounded-off bolt heads. They to that pretty well, but that's about it. The problem with using them to replace a standard set is space. Those sockets are larger that standard and often not able to get into the space needed to work as advertised.

BTW... METRIC ALL THE WAY BABY!! Just think... you would NEVER need to teach children fractions every again. Having a base 10 system of measure would be as easy to understand as our base 10 monetary system. The problem is the old grunts that just refuse to change "the way it's always been so it must be the best". News flash... it isn't.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:38 PM   #25
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Actually I do have the 36mm socket and a 3/4" breaker bar to go with it. Also works on the 356 Porsches. 320 ftlbs as I recall, breaker bar and a piece of pipe extension handle.

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Old 04-16-2012, 03:57 PM   #26
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Greetings,
I posted this comment (or I at least THOUGHT I did) either here or on another thread. Buy a proper set of SAE tools. The only additions necessary to work on a metric vehicle/apparatus are a 10mm and 17mm wrench/socket. I used to fix a friend's VW beetle and did just fine with tool assortment mentioned for 99.9% of tasks. Now socket head cap screws are a different matter.
RTF,

You left out 13mm. But the Japanese are found of some of the others as well.
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:39 PM   #27
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Greetings,
Well Mr. JD, it's either my SAE sockets were so worn that I could always find one to fit or my...
Triskaidekaphobia

36mm for the flywheel nut???? What's wrong with the cold chisel and sledge method? Providing of course you stay away from the roller bearing insert.
Mr. bobofthenorth. Now would that be metric or SAE vice grips?
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Old 04-16-2012, 06:07 PM   #28
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Greetings,
36mm for the flywheel nut???? What's wrong with the cold chisel and sledge method? Providing of course you stay away from the roller bearing insert.
Not a thing in the world, kind a tough to get a torque wrench on during re-installation though
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Old 04-16-2012, 09:12 PM   #29
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Can't help much there. I have enough of both that I don't buy sockets anymore except for true oddball situations.

I'll just point out, to me anyways, that one size fits all usually have a big screwup factor somewhere. Some fasteners they will fit well and some not so well. Some metric and inch sizes are dimensionally so close they are interchangeable. Some though, although they may fit, they may damage the fastener if it is tight. Often are good in light duty situations but if you really have to pull hard on the wrench/socket then they can ruin a fastener.

Often a really tight hex head fastener can only be dealt with a six point tool. The 12 points although more universally applicable will ruin the head particularily with smaller fasteners.

I've looked at those sort of semi spline sockets but haven't tried them. I'm sure they would be a good way to keep the tool count down but just be aware that there will be some fasteners they may damage if tight.

If you go that route buy good quality tools and be aware of the limitations.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:40 AM   #30
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There's all sorts of bodges that might work most of the time but when its O-dark:30 and you need to get it done there's no substitute for exactly the right tool. And in the big scheme of things having all the right tools doesn't really cost that much. Its a PITA having to carry metric and SAE but I don't need nearly the range of metric wrenches so I maybe carry a dozen or 18 metric wrenches in total c/w likely over 100 SAE.
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:04 AM   #31
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Can't help much there. I have enough of both that I don't buy sockets anymore except for true oddball situations.

I'll just point out, to me anyways, that one size fits all usually have a big screwup factor somewhere. Some fasteners they will fit well and some not so well. Some metric and inch sizes are dimensionally so close they are interchangeable. Some though, although they may fit, they may damage the fastener if it is tight. Often are good in light duty situations but if you really have to pull hard on the wrench/socket then they can ruin a fastener.

Often a really tight hex head fastener can only be dealt with a six point tool. The 12 points although more universally applicable will ruin the head particularily with smaller fasteners.

I've looked at those sort of semi spline sockets but haven't tried them. I'm sure they would be a good way to keep the tool count down but just be aware that there will be some fasteners they may damage if tight.

If you go that route buy good quality tools and be aware of the limitations.
I bought a set for my son for Christmas...at Lowes on sale so I don't think they were moving well...but the set actually suggested they work well on damaged fasteners.

I told him if they didn't work...then I'd swap a new "normal" set with him.
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:55 AM   #32
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Eric--- Actually I don't view SAE as "normal." In my world, metric is normal and has been for many, many years. I used the term "normal" in deference to the other posters who were bemoaning the "arrival" of metric to their world.

I can no longer visualize a mile. When I think lengths and distances I think in terms of metres and kilometres. I haven't made the mental switch to weights, however. I still think it terms of pounds and ounces, not grams and kilograms.
Yes, had to laugh. When we were in the UK this time last year, and doing a campervan thing before the canal-boat thing, I was intrigued to find that even the UK had gone to litres for fuel, but still miles per hour speeds on the road, and miles distance on the map.
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