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Old 09-08-2017, 08:44 PM   #81
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Number 6, number 6, number 6...sorry, its my sense of humour...
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Old 09-09-2017, 12:07 PM   #82
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Well since I could not find any problems with the damper plate or starter which may have prevented the engine from turning over I returned to the brute force method and finally got the engine to budge (to turn over). I did so by hitting a few of the pistons with a rubber mallet and then repeatedly hitting the starter which caused movement at about the rate of a 1/16 of an inch each time. I hit it about 20 times or so and finally was able to expose the #6 cylinder which I expected to have damage. I could not see any (Hopefully I did not damage the starter or anything else in the process.)

Unfortunately (as far as solving the riddle) there was no damage. In fact to my untrained eye except for excessive carbon I don't see any damage to the cylinders at all. There is a bit of scoring on the #5 but it seems minor to me (is there such a thing as minor scoring of a piston wall?). I tried to get a close up of it (last attachment) but its not very visible.

Also I removed the flywheel and did not see any damage there either.

The other thing is now I am at the final stages of pre engine removal. I was planning unbolt the bottom half from the top and then attempt to lift the top out with my beam and pulley system. The problem is the engine mounts are attached to the top half of the engine such that if I remove the bolts the bottom will fall about 6 inches until it is stopped by the oil catch pan under the engine. I guess I'll put some blocks under it and hope the pan is strong enough to support the engine. Otherwise I'll have to figure out how to support the bottom half while I am removing the top.
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Old 09-09-2017, 02:08 PM   #83
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It's pretty hard to tell from those photos but is that rust around the top of number 5?
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Old 09-09-2017, 03:14 PM   #84
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A couple of tricks: First, each piston has a few thou oil clearance between bore an piston, you should be able to wiggle piston in bore and visibly detect the motion. If all but one wiggle, you found one binding.

Also, put big wrench on crank pulley bolt and wiggle it cw/ccw. Check for the slightest motion on the outside diameter of the damper/pulley. All the bearings also have oil clearance so if there is motion that will tell you that the crank is not seized in a bearing,. If zero motion, then could be a main seized.
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Old 09-09-2017, 03:32 PM   #85
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I would pour some kerosene or other light penetrating oil in each cylinder and let it sit for a few hours. Maybe a stuck ring. Also I believe the pan is aluminum so you don't want to put any weight on it.
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Old 09-09-2017, 09:05 PM   #86
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thats a crack in the cylinder of your last pic.
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Old 09-11-2017, 03:35 PM   #87
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thats a crack in the cylinder of your last pic.
egads!! I hope your wrong about that. I'll take a closer look this evening.
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Old 09-11-2017, 03:43 PM   #88
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Crack ?

What did you find ?

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Old 09-11-2017, 06:44 PM   #89
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When replacing my Lehaman 120 the center of the lift was about 2' behind where the engine needs to be mounted. Used a 20" 2" x 12" board and hydraulic floor jack to roll it into and out of position. The oil pan can hold the weight just fine if it is distributed across the entire area.
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:57 PM   #90
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Don't those 6 cylinder Fords have wet liners, with the pistons out they should press out, if not a block of hardwood and a sharp crack with a hammer.
Personally having checked the transmission was free I'd lift the engine and make it my winter job to completely overhaul it, then look around and find a race shop and get it race balanced.
Overhaul the fuel pump and injectors and with strict servicing you'll have an engine good for 30 years. Don't forget always, always use anti-freeze all year round, it does way more than stop the engine from freezing.
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Old 09-12-2017, 05:45 AM   #91
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Or better yet have it professionally rebuilt as described in a great thread a year or so ago by Larry on Hobo.

Which begs the question as to the completeness of the rebuild on MPL's Lehman 1,800 hours ago.
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Old 09-19-2017, 03:39 PM   #92
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Here are a few photos for the engine removal process in case anyone is curious. It turned out to be an easier process than expected after getting our support built.

We also supported the cabin sole from underneath down to the stringers but I actually don't think we needed to do that as we already had four points of contact.

We are going to replace the engine mounts while we are at it. Does anyone have an opinion about mounts? Does it make a difference. I am looking forward to a well tuned, quiet engine with no vibrations. Not sure that is possible though with a Ford Lehman.
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Old 09-20-2017, 12:07 AM   #93
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Smile Engine came out relatively easy

Mike,

Yes, it looks like it came out relatively easily. Looks like you built an "A " frame over head to pull it out with.

Glad you got it out OK.

I was intending to assist you getting it out, but never got a call from you.

When I saw the pictures at how easy it was for you & then I could see you did not need my help.

Let us know what you find with the block & cylinders.

I still have that replacement engine for you.

So keep me in the loop.

Thanks.

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Old 09-20-2017, 02:25 PM   #94
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Personally speaking while the engine was out I'd clean the engine compartment and re-paint it.
If you wish to stop vibration you may wish to go the whole hog and put in a flexible drive and thrust mounting and softer engine mountings.
Check out GKN Aquadrive range.
Once it's done you'll be surprised at the difference, it'll sound like a mouse chawing tissue paper !
It's a big job but with winter approaching it will be a nice winter project with real benefits for the foreseeable future of the boat.
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Old 09-20-2017, 03:28 PM   #95
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Great photos of the lift. I am interested to see how you got it from there to the ground ie out of the cabin then off the boat. Any photos?
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Old 09-20-2017, 07:38 PM   #96
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Great photos of the lift. I am interested to see how you got it from there to the ground ie out of the cabin then off the boat. Any photos?
Yeh me too. I am just about ready to swap my lehman out with a cummins and am interested on how well it squeezes out the door.

By the way, it's probably a good thing you braced to the stringers. The 4x4 timbers that support the floor are connected together with notched out joints. The weight of the engine is definitely enough to cause the floor to sag and if it sags at all the notches are permanently enlarged and the floor will always sag unless you add bracing to hold it up (forever more).

One more thing, time the injection pump before the engine is installed. It is near impossible to see the flywheel timing marks otherwise.
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Old 09-21-2017, 03:21 PM   #97
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It squeezed out the door pretty well. The only things I removed were

To reduce weight and for inspection/diagnostics:
Flywheel
Exhaust manifold
Head


To reduce width:
Engine mounts
CrankCase Vent tube/Cap
Oil Filter and other minor things

I did not remove the fuel injector pump.

With these things removed the width of my engine was roughly 19.5 inches and my door which I think is standard is about 22 inches. The thing is though flywheel (aft) end is offset to the port whereas the Injector pump end is offset to the starboard so you have to bring it to one side and then the other as you exit the doorway.

I had expected to build some sort of lift system to get it out of the door but once we had it on the $10 harbor fright! dollies we wheeled it to the door and went for it. My ramp was 3/4 ply. As you can see from the pictures I did not cover the door threshold. For that we used a racing jack which we put on the ramp and then lifted the flywheel housing, removed the front dolly and dragged it through the doorway. We then replaced the front dolly and moved the racing jack to the back and again moved the engine forward down the ramp until the racing jack hit the threshold. We put the dolly back and that was about it.

I have not removed it from the boat yet. Im thinking I'll let the boat yard do that since it would just be a matter of them craning it up into a truck.

Having said that though now the wheels are spinning and I'm thinking why not take it all the way
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Old 09-21-2017, 06:29 PM   #98
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You wheeling that out of the salon or a garage?
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Old 09-21-2017, 07:24 PM   #99
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Smile Replacement engine

The hard part is done.

Next - If you can get it off the boat & out to the parking lot & into a pick up truck bed & then bring in a replacement engine long block & reverse the procedure & get that again back on the boat, you can do this whole job yourself !

I think you can do this. I have a harbor freight collapsible engine lift Crain you can borrow to lift it in to a P/U truck in the parking lot over at a buddies house & it has wheels. That may help you make this an easier job than you thought it would be. Maybe a extra spare floor jack could help some too.

So this has shown that you can get the engine In or out with the head on or off -- so a replacement engine with the head on it could be done as well as that is only a height, not width measurement issue.

So with your new replacement engine, just take the fly wheel off & exhaust manifold off & leave the injection pump on & you could wheel in a new engine your self.

Save all that labor charges money.

Keep up the good work.

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Old 09-27-2017, 06:40 PM   #100
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Well the engine is out of the boat and into my garage. I've opened it up and turned if over and still no sign of damage (at least to my untrained eye).

I thought before looking at all the various bearings I'd open the timing cover and take a look at the timing gear. The problem is how to remove the pulley.

I tried putting an impact wrench on the bolt but no luck.

On the other hand Im thinking is there really any chance that the timing gears are damaged and that is what is preventing it from turning over? I'd prefer to not to remove that pulley if I don't have to .
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