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Old 04-22-2016, 06:55 PM   #21
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Take out the injector and look in there with a boroscope. Even Home Depot sells them. Damage will be obvious.
Call Ken Bowles at Northwest Charters Grand Banks sales in Seattle and ask him about his number 6. Or ask on the Grand Banks site - Bob Lowe keeps a pickle where the sun doesn't shine but he has good info.
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Old 04-22-2016, 07:56 PM   #22
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Trouble w putting solvents in the cylinder is that diesel pistons are usually dished. Pouring solvent in just puddles in the bowel unless you fill it and then if you crank the engine you've got a 55-1 compression ratio.

If you know the injector is over the bowel or depression you can put lots of solvent in and let it sit. If it leaks by the piston skirt you'll have solvent in the oil but depending on the solvent it should'nt be a problem if only very temporary. I would do that and use SeaFoam as the solvent. Risoline is the same product or close enough. I used that stuff to free up rings on old outboards years ago.

I can't believe nobody has come up w a fix for the overheating #6 cylinder. If I had an FL I'd sure tru something.
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Old 04-22-2016, 08:22 PM   #23
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Here`s the advice I`ve received:
AD advised that in a bad case of sludging remove the drain plug in the block near no.6 to assist flushing. (Mechanic says "drain plug" is what Aussies call "welsh plug"[no disrespect to the Welsh]. Seems a quite aggressive approach.) Mechanic says use good coolant, dilute coolant concentrate with distilled water, flush and change coolant if necessary.
Of course, no.6 is also furthest from the FW circulation pump.
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Old 04-22-2016, 09:41 PM   #24
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I asked the same question this past fall about sludge and got the "it's rarely a problem" and not worth pulling the freeze plug back there....

Straight from AD.

So who knows.

Every year it seems that more and more conflicting info gets passed around about Lehmans.
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Old 04-22-2016, 09:57 PM   #25
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Here`s the advice I`ve received:
AD advised that in a bad case of sludging remove the drain plug in the block near no.6 to assist flushing. (Mechanic says "drain plug" is what Aussies call "welsh plug"[no disrespect to the Welsh]. Seems a quite aggressive approach.) Mechanic says use good coolant, dilute coolant concentrate with distilled water, flush and change coolant if necessary.
Of course, no.6 is also furthest from the FW circulation pump.
A more effective way to flush your coolant system is to use Cascade dish washing liquid. Cleans out a dirty coolant system very well with little or no foaming action.
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Old 04-22-2016, 10:00 PM   #26
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I asked the same question this past fall about sludge and got the "it's rarely a problem" and not worth pulling the freeze plug back there....

Straight from AD.

So who knows.

Every year it seems that more and more conflicting info gets passed around about Lehmans.
All I can say is I've personslly cleaned out a lot of sludge from neglected Lehman cooling systems over the years.
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Old 04-22-2016, 10:43 PM   #27
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My recollection of the email advice from AD was that removing the drain plug could be done in an extreme case of sludge build up. Hope that helps put it in context.

Edit. I just found the 11 January 2013 email from Brian Smith: " The "silt" in the fresh water system has me concerned the most. Flushing the block is exactly what I would recommend to do. In an extreme step,the rear freeze plug on the block can be removed to determine if sediment is accumulating at the back of #6 cylinder."
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Old 04-23-2016, 12:01 AM   #28
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If you think your #6 cylinder may be overheating, go to your auto parts store or Harbor Freight and purchase an infra red thermometer for about $25.00. Run your engine untill it is warmed up and take a temperature reading of the block about three inches down from the cylinder head/block joint. Start at #1 and work back to #6 about 6 inches at a time. If the water passages at the rear cylinder are plugged you will see much higher temperatures where there is no water flow. Do not be alarmed if there is a gradual increase in temps from front to rear because of the increasing distance from the circulating pump.
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Old 04-23-2016, 09:03 AM   #29
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just take the freeze plug out on the back of the block and look
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Old 04-23-2016, 09:30 PM   #30
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Thanks for all the input. It has given me much to think about.

I think my approach will be to try some miracle snake oil first and then once that fails I'll remove the head to get a visual inspection of the piston and cylinder. At that point I'll hope to find some frozen but repairable rings per FF's suggestion and maybe I'll be able to hone the cylinder in place.

I'd be happy to just live with it (for a while) but I am worried about two things. 1) the oily mess it makes out the breather tube and filter but also 2.) more importantly what further damage it may due to the engine?

There seem to be mixed views about what additional damage can come about by running the engine with a bad cylinder. Anyone have any additional input on that. I took the boat out today and kept her at sub 1700 RPM's and but for the additional smoke and oil she did great.

I tend to agree with what FF said above "Heaven might be "perfect",,, but for a cruising diesel reliable IS perfection.". Reliable is good enough for me but I don't want to destroy the engine. Come winter I can take her out and address the engine at that time.
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Old 04-23-2016, 09:45 PM   #31
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I'd be happy to just live with it (for a while) but I am worried about two things. 1) the oily mess it makes out the breather tube and filter but also 2.) more importantly what further damage it may due to the engine?

.
A good "Pro Vent" catch can will help fix that problem
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Old 04-23-2016, 10:45 PM   #32
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I can't believe nobody has come up w a fix for the overheating #6 cylinder. If I had an FL I'd sure tru something.
When Harbor Marine, Everett, WA rebuilds a FL, they drill and tap the block in the lower part of the number 6 water jacket and install a fitting which is the supply or return (I don't know which) for the hot water cabin heater. This is supposed to improve flow around number 6. For more info call Mike in the engine shop.
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Old 04-24-2016, 12:20 AM   #33
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I think you're nuts to run it with a bad cylinder. If the cylinder is galled you can break rings or worse, have the piston seize, break a rod? Crap in the oil, you name it. Don't run it, don't use snake oil, take a good look at it before you bake the entire engine. Reliable? It's giving you all the warning possible before you have a catastrophic and you have to throw it away.
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Old 04-24-2016, 03:00 AM   #34
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How about a sticking valves caused by water seeping into the back of the valve head and sticking the valve open? Because it has been HOT?
Check by using oil down injector port if compression improves its rings if it does not it could be a stuck valve, I think those engines are free runners???( the valve wont hit the piston top) maybe it will if it is stuck wide open?? There are better more experienced heads than mine on here!
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Old 04-24-2016, 03:58 AM   #35
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How about a sticking valves caused by water seeping into the back of the valve head and sticking the valve open? Because it has been HOT?
Check by using oil down injector port if compression improves its rings if it does not it could be a stuck valve, I think those engines are free runners???( the valve wont hit the piston top) maybe it will if it is stuck wide open?? There are better more experienced heads than mine on here!
Water can certainly make its way to the FL 120 #6 cylinder through the exhaust port. I have seen both raw water and coolant end up there.
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Old 04-24-2016, 10:48 AM   #36
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When Harbor Marine, Everett, WA rebuilds a FL, they drill and tap the block in the lower part of the number 6 water jacket and install a fitting which is the supply or return (I don't know which) for the hot water cabin heater. This is supposed to improve flow around number 6. For more info call Mike in the engine shop.
Hi Larry,
Are you up the coast now?
Glad to see someone has done something about the FL cooling problem. Mike is very very well known in the PNW for his good work and occasional good joke. He/they rebuilt our BW.
Probably would be the return hose from the heater as that would probably be the "suction" side of the loop. I'm quite sure one of our hot water hoses goes basically directly to the water pump. Would very likely draw some hot coolant away from #6 cyl.
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Old 04-24-2016, 11:15 AM   #37
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How about a sticking valves caused by water seeping into the back of the valve head and sticking the valve open? Because it has been HOT?
Check by using oil down injector port if compression improves its rings if it does not it could be a stuck valve, I think those engines are free runners???( the valve wont hit the piston top) maybe it will if it is stuck wide open?? There are better more experienced heads than mine on here!
Not good advice to put oil down a injector hole in a diesel for compression check. Oil goes right into piston bowl and that alone changes the compression ratio. Of course the readings will go up.

Leaky valves will not cause the blowby flow to go up, leaky valves send compression into exh or intake, if the compression is coming out the crankcase vent, it IS leaking past the rings.

No harm in trying something like outboard ring free, but if any of the aluminum smeared near the rings, it will do nothing.

And running it further can turn a piston replacement and in site hone job into an engine replacement.

Does cylinder fire at all at 1700 under load? or is all the fuel coming out as smoke? If it is not firing, that hole is in really bad shape.

Do the compressed air into inj hole trick, see if pressure builds with valves closed.
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Old 04-24-2016, 11:24 AM   #38
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Do diesels burn holes in their piston crowns like gas engines?
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Old 04-24-2016, 12:03 PM   #39
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FL "Ticks" at all speeds

I have a FL 120 (one of a pair) on a President 41 Trawler. I have been driven to distraction by a constant "Ticking" sound in the after part of the top end of the engine. I have done all the expected things and cannot find a problem. Engine performs fine, no smoke to speak of, plenty of power but it still makes noise. This has gone on for about 2 years now. Engine has about 3300 hours. Oil analysis shows nothing out of the ordinary. Can someone advise on this. My best mechanic says maybe "Piston Slap".
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Old 04-24-2016, 12:05 PM   #40
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Do diesels burn holes in their piston crowns like gas engines?
Yep, they do, but mostly in high output turbodiesels making 50+ hp/liter. On lower rated engines the piston crowns rarely burn, but if piston gets too hot it expands to eat up all clearance and then it starts to scuff. Damage there is usually limited to skirt and bore.
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